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U.S. Articles of Interest

Page 3

 

 

Arkansas Toothpick

Arkansas Toothpick


Arkansas Toothpick
Arkansas Toothpick
Arkansas Toothpick
Arkansas Toothpick
Arkansas Toothpick
Arkansas Toothpick
Arkansas Toothpick
Fancy Arkansas Toothpick (Item USARTICLES 3-1; ANTWEP 4-16)

DESCRIPTION: This is a great example of the American classic knife used by mountain men, Mississippi riverboat gamblers, and gunslingers and was often used in the stockings of ‘shady ladies’ in a smaller version. This one has a belt or boot clip and could have been used by any of the above. It has been said of Billy the Kid that he wore one tucked in his boot as a secondary weapon to his Colt Bisley revolver. The best and finest of these knives were manufactured in England and were the most expensive in the 1840s and 50s. The one we offer is certainly one of these classic examples. It has a genuine bone grip with Florentine pommel design nicely carved in bone. The crossguard and its upper section that join the grip are in genuine silver and note that the design closely matches the motif of the carved-bone pommel. The scabbard is also silver although of a lesser grade, but beautifully engraved with floral motif all over its front side. The fastening clip that protrudes from the throat is sturdy and certainly significantly utilitarian to its purpose. This would have been worth many times its weight in gold in the era of the Wild West. Somehow it has a San Francisco look to it. Does it to you? This is beautiful little lethal “charmer” whose intent was always to be glamorous, yet deadly.

PRICE: $1,800.00
Germania International will not ship any item that contains any animal parts to any country where such items are prohibited!

 

 

Widmann Sword

Widmann Sword

 

Widmann Sword

Widmann Sword
Backside

Widmann Sword
Knuckle bow

Widmann Sword
Typical Widmann eagle

Widmann Sword
Bone grip

Widmann Sword

Widmann Sword

Widmann Sword

Widmann Sword
Door dent

Widmann Sword
Two Widmann swords pictured

Widmann Sword
Another typical Widmann

Widmann Sword

Widmann Sword

 

Excellent Widmann Eagle-Head Sword (c. 1840s) (Item USARTICLES 3-2; ANTWEP 1-8)

DESCRIPTION: Here is an excellent example of the famed Widmann sword with bone grips with Federal eagle clamshell guard. This one has the Widmann touch all the way and the eagle’s head is 100 percent the F.W. Widmann type VI. This is clearly an infantry-officer’s sword of the 1840 period. It has the typical Widmann finish with silver wash or plate which brings out all the fine detail consistent with Widmann swords. Frederick Widmann was the greatest sword cutler in America operating out of Philadelphia, where he opened shortly after embarking from Bremen, Germany. It is quite possible that he received his training in sword cutlery in Bremen as that North Sea port and its smaller companion port of Emden were the two principal overseas shipping points for the Solingen Blade trade; therefore, it is hardly strange that Widmann almost exclusively employed utility-grade Solingen blades in conducting his business in America. Widmann’s forenames–Frederick Wilhelm—have a Prussian ring to them which may mean nothing; however, he kept a tinted engraving of the Prussian King Frederick the Great in a prominent location in his home suggesting a strong sense of Prussian pride. The eagle’s head on the sword we offer is the personification of the Prussian Adler (eagle). The “Alte Fritz” Frederick would have loved it. Nothing could be more Prussian. The sword we offer is unusual in its great length of 38 inches in its scabbard. The blade shows its age. Some of the bluing is slightly discernible but the blade in general shows years of use and is a bit tired and shows old rust stains (removed). The grip shows the usual slight age crack practically always to be expected. The eagle and knuckle bow are excellent. The decoration on the knuckle bow is on the frontal side only (typical Widmann). The eagle on the clamshell guard is typical of the 1840s’ style and it has a very dramatic appearance. The scabbard has a doorway crease. This often occurred when the officer would proceed through a doorway and the sword following up secured to his belt would often fail to follow the man closely enough and get slammed in the door thus receiving the doorway crease. All in all, this sword is an important and handsome relic of better times in our America. It should be in a museum or a good collection like yours. Today Widmann is memorialized regularly by American sword collectors who consider appropriately that Widmann’s series of swords constitutes one of the most fascinating specialties known to their hobby.

PRICE: $1,800.00; an excellent investment for such an excellent and important piece of American history.
Germania International will not ship any item that contains any animal parts to any country where such items are prohibited!

 

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword

 

Revolutionary Sword
Beautiful swirl pattern

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword
Hallmarks?

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword
Hallmarks?

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword
Blade decor

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword
A replica of George Washington with his battle sword

Revolutionary Sword
Note the close resemblance seen between our sword and this one owned by George Washington

 

Magnificent American Revolution Silver Mounted Hanger (Sword) (Item USARTICLES 3-3; ANTWEP 1-9)

DESCRIPTION: A military hanger is a shortsword with a blade averaging 24-25 inches having at least one cutting edge. The hanger was originally used by the infantryman to supplement his musket for close-in fighting. Infantry hangers are of great interest to collectors because they offer many variations. The one we offer here undoubtedly belonged to an officer who was a member of the landed gentry because practically no common soldier could have been able to afford a weapon such as this one. The normal hanger of the period would have brass fittings, wooden grip, and look quite utilitarian and rather homely. This sword, on the other hand, is quite beautiful having a deeply grooved grip with heavy silver wrapping, sculpted silver crossguard and pommel. The scabbard throat and tip are also of fine coin silver. The blade is embellished with a sun symbol emitting solar rays with an inlaid gold escutcheon on each side of the blade. The blade is 24 inches long. There seem to be hallmarks of some kind struck on the quillons, but we could not make them out. We do know that this sword is of American make. If it were British the hallmarks would be crisp and legible. Possibility: if one goes to the web site The Paul Revere House and then to the narrative entitled “What did Revere’s shop make? (According to the daybooks of 1761-1797),” the article clearly mentions a sword hilt!) We presume that the sword hilt was of silver. He may have made quite a few sword fittings because swords were one of the most-favored articles of wear in the mid-18th century. We also show images of the battle sword of George Washington, and you can readily see the similarity. Washington’s sword was produced by the American maker J. Bailey in Fishkill, New York. The English name for this style sword is “cuttoe.” The spiraling silver wire is missing on the Washington sword that is presently in the Smithsonian Institution. Our specimen; however, is in remarkably beautiful condition with its broad grip silver bands intact. For a weapon dating about 1776 or so it is indeed rare; even the leather scabbard is in immaculate condition. Where would you ever find a relic of the Revolutionary War comparable to this?

PRICE: SOLD

 

Rockwell Painting

Rockwell Painting

 

Rockwell Painting

Rockwell Painting

Rockwell Painting

Rockwell Painting

Rockwell Painting

Rockwell Painting

Rockwell Painting

Rockwell Painting

 

Original Print by Norman Rockwell Depicting Boy Scouts of America (Item USARTICLES 3-4)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a charming and beautiful print of Norman Rockwell’s Boy Scouts of America masterpiece. Since the beginning of the scouting movement in America 100 years ago, events have been recorded in paintings and drawings by an official artist. Remarkably, there have been just two such official artists in all that time: Norman Rockwell and Joseph Osatari. Through brushstrokes of oil on canvas the artists chronicled the history of scouting in America from campouts, hikes, and pinewood derby races to the scouts’ public service initiatives throughout its long history. Our historical advisor was proud to have been a Boy Scout and so much did he love it that today being over 75 years old he can recite word for word the Boy Scout Oath and the Boy Scout Law. The Boy Scouts of America is for sure the finest organization ever created to assist American boys to become responsible men and citizens. Annually, there are more than a million adults who contribute uncountable volunteer hours to the BSA, assisting almost three million Boy Scouts. However, being what society is today, among those millions of patriotic men of the BSA are a few predatory homosexuals who infiltrate themselves into the organization only to prey sexually on young boys. So now we have homosexuals, liberals, communists, and damned lawyers attacking vehemently this wonderful 100-percent American iconic group without mercy. At least it can be said of the Hitler Youth that there was no chance of anything like that happening because these aforementioned perverts and shysters would have gotten a speedy ride to Dachau. Instead, we have a situation with the BSA being assaulted by lawsuits most by the Red-leaning ACLU which claims that BSA is composed of loathsome homophobes who discriminate against these “queers” (my wordage) barring them from positions as adult scout leaders. On the other hand, BSA is attacked by lawsuits seeking millions from BSA for allegedly failing to protect boys from these homosexual predators thus the BSA appears to be damned if it bans homos as adult volunteers and damned if it doesn’t. This of course is what our America is being put through on many fronts and this situation will prevail unless Americans get some courage and gumption and run these liberal and Red bastards (tarred and feathered) out on a rail. This brings us to the Rockwell print. It seems that a little rodent named Blake Gopnik claimed that Rockwell lacked courage for not glorifying leftwing causes and he goes on to in mid rant to tell us how he absolutely hates Norman Rockwell. But if you saw the art that this nasty little blockhead does like you had better not be eating lunch when viewing it or you probably will lose it! He said America isn’t about Rockwell’s one-note image of it or anyone else’s. This country is about a game-changing guarantee that equal room will be made for Latino socialists (communists), disgruntled lesbian monsters, foul-mouthed Jewish comics, and even dare I say it, metrosexual art critics. So, dear reader, you make the choice. Shall we keep our American icons or should we bow down to the likes of dirty Blake and other knuckle walkers who hate our Norman Rockwells, John Waynes, Doris Days, and Charlie Browns.

The Print

The original painting entitled “All Together” was done in 1947. This one is an original commemorative print; not a reproduction. These prints were distributed by the Boy Scouts of America mostly in a smaller size 11 x 14 inches. The one here that would hang in BSA offices is 27 x 33 1/2 inches. The print is in pristine condition with an absolutely beautiful frame that is top quality and was expensive. The paint has rich and vibrant colors and a border that illustrates all the scouting merit badges (33 of them.) The earlier small prints did not have this feature. The wonderful print depicts Boy Scouts during a session of rock climbing along with a beautiful Cocker Spaniel—this breed was becoming very popular at this time—while one scout offers the helping hand to another who climbs on up, thus the name of the print is called “All Together.” This is a Rockwell masterpiece regardless of the sick art criticism of that little serpent, Blake Gopnik.

PRICE: SOLD

 

Painting

Painting

 

Painting

Painting

Painting

Painting

Painting

Painting

Painting

Painting

 

Magnificent Oil Painting of a WWI General (Item USARTICLES 3-5)

DESCRIPTION: This canvas is by Seymour M. Stone (1877-1957). Stone was a renowned American artist, having painted several subjects in his lifetime from portraits to landscapes and action scenes. This painting is of an American WWI officer of two-star rank (major general) that we have determined to be Henry Tureman Allen. The study is signed and dated in the lower-left corner, as follows: “Seymour M. Stone H.K. Kameniawski 1929.” The general appears to have served in WWI and you can see he has multiple decorations of European origin. The frame measures 45 1/2 x 34 inches; the canvas measures 39 1/2 x 30. There is some damage at the right corner of the frame, but the painting overall is in good condition with some slight distress bumps in the right side of the portrait adjacent to the general’s head, but not in the figure itself. The figure of the general is very regal looking. The artist Seymour Millais Stone was born in Gorod Novo Grudock, Russia, in 1877. A very prolific artist of famous people, he is most famous for a painting of Theodore Roosevelt. He was most active with his much-sought-after paintings in New York. This painting would be most impressive in a den, office, or living room. It certainly will bring comments galore wherever this old, but distinguished, warhorse is present. The artist did a marvelous job of bringing this general’s personality and military bearing to the canvas.

PRICE: $1,500.00

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812
Backside of pommel

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812
Backside of scabbard

Sword from War of 1812
Note the museum-quality leather repair

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

 

Grandiose Presentation Sword from the War of 1812 (Item USARTICLES 3-6; ANTWEP 2-37)

DESCRIPTION: This is at least one of the grandest American swords of the War of 1812 that we have ever seen. It belonged to Colonel George Edward Mitchell (1781-1832), Baltimore or Philadelphia circa 1818, with full and unusual eagle and shield pommel above a faceted five ball (D) guard and carved-bone grip and with imported blade retaining most of its gilding and bluing and engraved with patriotic emblems including American eagles, Liberty with a feathered Indian headdress and a panoply of arms as well. It is accompanied by a brass-mounted leather scabbard length 38 3/4 inches. The leather on the scabbard is replaced with fine museum conservation methods (Absolute Perfection).

Provenance: descended in the Mitchell family to the last owner

The sword was presented to Col. G. E. Mitchell, a physician in the Third Maryland Artillery by the Maryland General Assembly in recognition of his distinguished service during the battles of York, Fort George, Fort Niagara, and especially Fort Oswego, N.Y. In several places on the Internet are notes about his service in the War of 1812. In that year Mitchel raised a company of volunteers in Cecil County Maryland to enter active military service in the summer and fall of 1812. Then-Major Mitchell and his Cecil volunteers went into the camp at Albany, New York, and then entered the campaign against the British on the Canadian Front. On March 3, 1813, Mitchell was honored for his valuable services in Canada by being promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel and the following year was promoted to colonel for his gallantry at Oswego. Colonel Mitchell was the first to announce the news of peace to the British authorities in Canada. George Edward Mitchell was born in Elkton, Maryland, the son of Abraham Mitchel and studied medicine at the University of Pennsylvania graduating in 1805. He practiced with his father in Elkton from 1806 to 1812. Mitchell also served in the Maryland House of Delegates in 1808 and 1809 and was elected a member of the state Executive Council and served from 1809 to 1812. He served two terms in the U.S. House of Representatives between 1823 and 1827 and was instrumental in inviting Lafayette to return to the United States in 1824. He ran for governor of Maryland and lost in 1829. Mitchell then returned to the House of Representatives and died in office in 1832. He is buried in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. The papers of Col. George E. Mitchell are in the collection of the Maryland Historical Society. You can find similar information by searching the Internet. The Governor of Maryland later presented him with this elegant sword in honor of his bravery. Here, my collector friends, is the chance to procure not only a stunningly beautiful American sword, but to capture a profoundly important piece of United States history. This accounting mentioned is found on any number of search engines at “Upper Bay War of 1812 Maryland Centennial.” Then click notable people. Mention of Mitchell can also be found at Wikipedia’s accounting of the Battle of Oswego. Here was a true American hero!

PRICE: SOLD

 

Stamp Act Sculpture

Stamp Act Sculpture

Stamp Act Sculpture
The Stamp Act scroll

Stamp Act Sculpture

Stamp Act Sculpture

Stamp Act Sculpture

Stamp Act Sculpture

Stamp Act Sculpture
The Stamp Act seal

Stamp Act Sculpture
Poster depicting how the colonists felt about the act

Stamp Act Sculpture
Tarring and feathering a revenuer
(a good Idea even today!)

Stamp Act Sculpture
The effigy and the British boot hanging in the Liberty Tree

Stamp Act Sculpture
Stamp Act official beaten by patriots

Stamp Act Sculpture
Reading the Stamp Act

Stamp Act Sculpture
“Hang the tax-collector bastards!”

Stamp Act Sculpture
Note the liberty cap on a pole in the picture

 

Original Bronze Sculpture of an American Revolutionary Patriot who Undoubtedly Belonged to the “Sons of Liberty” (Item USARTICLES 3-7; BRONZEMET 3-18)

DESCRIPTION: Here is possibly one of the most important historical bronzes we have ever obtained depicting one of our American epochs of glory.
(In my opinion the American Revolutionary War and the subsequent War of 1812 were the only wars that the nation fought that were morally and ethically acceptable!)
This very dramatic statue depicts one of the prerevolutionary patriots who surges forward in the cause of liberty while stepping on the infamous Stamp Act. The bronze sculpture is very heavy seemingly of solid bronze. It is also a fairly large piece–28 ½ inches high. The figure holds his sword, commonly called a ‘hanger’ or shortsword, in one hand ready for battle and in the other he holds the American flag that for him is the holy ensign. The flag is held unfurled, but at the ready to be cast forth in full display in the cause of liberty. The man wears the revolutionary cap so reminiscent of the times and the cause. Behind him is the stump of the tree that was all that remained from 1775 after the British felled it. The tree stood in Boston near Boston Common in the days before the American Revolution, 1776-1783. In 1765, colonists in Boston staged the first act of defiance against the British government at the tree. The tree then became a rallying point to the rule of Britain over the American colonies and it was for this reason that prompted the British soldiers to cut it down. However, it can never be forgotten that in a letter to a fellow patriot, Thomas Jefferson said: “The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.” It is a fact of American history that on 14 August 1765, a crowd gathered in Boston under the large elm tree at the corner of Essex Street and Washington Street to protest the hated Stamp Act. Patriots, who later called themselves the Sons of Liberty, had hanged Andrew Oliver in effigy in the branches of the tree. Oliver was the colonist chosen by King George III to impose the Stamp Act and right up there in the tree along with the effigy hung a British cavalry jackboot. Grinning from inside the boot was a devil-like doll holding a scroll marked “Stamp Act.” On 10 September, a sign saying “Tree of Liberty” was nailed to the trunk of the tree. On the bronze statue offered here is a scroll marked “Stamp Act” and is seen at the feet of our patriot Colonist soldier, and behind him is seen the stump of the Tree of Liberty. This sculpture is not signed. Why? we do not know for it truly is a wonderful depiction of American resolve and independence. It had to be by a masterful sculptor indeed. The drama and historical excellence is most noteworthy. We have dealt in bronze statuary for decades and have never seen a first-class sculpture depicting this glorious and turbulent era. Here is a true rarity that serves as a fitting memorial to supreme patriotism and courage of those brave men who risked their property and even their lives in the cause of freedom. Would that we could see such men step forward now that America so desperately needs them.

PRICE: P.O.R.

 

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812
Stitching's still good after two centuries

Sword from War of 1812
U.S. federal eagle

Sword from War of 1812
Floral design

Sword from War of 1812
Cavalry etching

Sword from War of 1812
Potpourri design

Sword from War of 1812
Cooper, the sword smith

Sword from War of 1812
American cavalry vs British “lobsterbacks”

Sword from War of 1812
American cavalryman in the War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812
Trooper of the
Second Regiment of Light Dragoons
War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812

Sword from War of 1812
American cavalry at the Battle of Fallen Timbers, 1794

Sword from War of 1812
Andy Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans;
the last major battle of the War of 1812

 

Magnificent Horsehead Dragoon Sword—War of 1812 Vintage (Item USARTICLES 3-8; ANTWEP 3-6)

DESCRIPTION: Here is an “absolute treasure”! A cavalry sword used by an officer of the American army in the War of 1812 against the British forces. This sword is not only superb, but it is truly rare! The American swords with eagle-head pommels have been the epitome of weapons and are always actually admired throughout the world and have found their way into some of the finest collections and museums in the United States and abroad. Many books have been published listing and picturing many of these fabulous weapons. It was the War of 1812 that brought some of the finest sword smiths forth and the eagle heads added to American sabers were now in vogue. In 1782, by an act of the Continental Congress, the bald eagle became the national symbol. In fact, the eagle became firmly established as America’s symbol and it became the most popular one ever devised. Ever since the late 18th century the eagle has been a favorite in every form of decoration, not the least of which was the officer’s personal sidearm—his sword. The only deviation from this rule was the rare horsehead pommel that seemingly was used exclusively by cavalry units such as the American Light Horse and Pennsylvania Light dragoons. By the time the War of 1812 began, dozens of styles of the eagle pommel had surfaced, but very few horsehead models were seen, and even this time being used only by these elite units of horse soldiers, especially the 1st, 2nd, and Light dragoons. The former owner (collector) said his original information was garnered from the elderly gentleman from whom he obtained the sword. He said that the sword had been willed to his grandfather by a veteran of the 1812 war, who was attached to the Maryland Light Dragoons. The sword is in beautiful condition with beautiful bone grip with the wonderful horsehead pommel. The horse is fitted with a bridle in the typical English style. His mane floats down the back of the bronze grip. The “D” guard is molded in an orb motif and floral pattern, and emerging from the bottom of the crossguard is a beautiful clamshell languet. The bone grip has turned in color from white to a smooth, soft brown. It has the usual ages-old cracks as you can see in our images. This is completely usual on sword with bone grips from the era. The leather scabbard is intact with the usual slight minute cracks, but is still sound and intact. The metal fittings at throat, midsection, and boot are sound. This is highly unusual because 99 percent of swords with leather scabbards of this period are missing their sheaths due to the elements and of age. To have a complete scabbard as this marvelous example has is extremely rare. The sword is also “immense” compared with other swords of the period. It is a full 40 inches long and this indicates that this horse soldier was a very large man; unusual for cavalrymen, however, certainly not without precedent. The blade of this sabre is also great. It is blued and gilded and underneath the languet and crossguard is the company name, “J. Cooper.” This name is under a potpourri of depicted weapons, such as pikes, cannon, halberds, and a Romanesque helmet. In the center of the blade is the U.S. federal eagle with the banner proclaiming E Pluribus Unum flanked beautifully by floral sprays. On the other side we have floral décor and another potpourri of weapons, but central to all of this is the most telling symbol that seems to prove that this was an 18th century Dragoon sword. Here we see a mounted dragoon officer brandishing a sword and he wears the typical dragoon helmet that was modeled from the gladiator helmets of Imperial Rome. This is undoubtedly the greatest American sword we have ever had the pleasure of offering and the finest we have seen offered in the field in many a year. Something like this comes along once in a lifetime. Don’t miss it if you are a serious collector, or even if you simply want a fantastic prodigiously important item of American history.

PRICE: SOLD

 

US Army Dress Helmet

US Army Dress Helmet

US Army Dress Helmet

US Army Dress Helmet

US Army Dress Helmet

US Army Dress Helmet

US Army Dress Helmet

US Army Dress Helmet

US Army Dress Helmet

US Army Dress Helmet
U.S. 7th Cavalry uniform is shown,
but the artillery was the same but with RED trim

US Army Dress Helmet
U.S. cavalry uniform of 1881

US Army Dress Helmet
Note the handsome fellow in the middle with horse-plume helmet

US Army Dress Helmet

US Army Dress Helmet

US Army Dress Helmet

 

U.S. Model 1881 Light Artillery Dress Helmet (Item USARTICLES 3-9)

DESCRIPTION: This U.S. helmet is possibly the neatest-looking American headgear ever worn by U.S. troops. The Department of War at that time always seemed to copy the winners!!! and the Imperial Prussian Army was the grand victor over France in 1870. (Franco-Prussian War). So, five years later the U.S. Army adopted this beautiful dress helmet. The Indian Wars kept the army busy until the surrender of Geronimo in 1886, and finally the U.S. 7th Calvary murdered more than 200 men, women, and children of the Lakota Sioux tribe at Wounded Knee on December 29, 1890, thus ending the Indian Wars of Independence. During this period, the dress uniform of various branches of the American army sported these helmets along with a resplendent uniform to go with it. This one we offer is an officer’s grade with large, tall, all-black crown with patent-leather edging and almost all the leather trim remains. The helmet has a large front-plate insignia depicting the American eagle. It has a bright-red horsehair plume atop a brass, spiked fixture. The eagle plate sports cannon barrels emerging from behind the eagle and U.S. flag plate. Crossed cannons also are featured on the side buttons along with ventilated side vents. It has a gold, braided cord and has no sweatband (condition fine!). To find one of these helmets that is nearly 155 years old is nearly impossible today, especially in this condition. Grab it while you can!

PRICE: $1,500.00

 

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook
Loose binding

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

Yearbook

 

Yearbook from Ellington Field Airbase; 1918 (Item USARTICLES 3-10; AVIATION 1-3)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a rare, original edition of the yearbook of the famed Texas Airfield Ellington. It measures 8 1/2 x 11 inches and is in fairly good condition considering that it is nearly 100 years old. It has a leatherette cover that is in decent condition except that the spine has some issues, and the binding has loosened and the spine has some scuff marks and a page or two has come loose. It has the name of the former owner, D.J. Burtschell, printed on the spine and as an ex libra on the first page. At least the actual pages are in fine condition and unmarked by age. It obviously was in a place that it was given at least a modicum of care and safety. The book is terrific with pictures of the pilots, aircrew members, air engagements all from the recent war. It’s absolutely chock full of pictures of airfield personnel; mostly military. The book comprises 318 pages of text and many pictures of these early aircraft and the daring young men who flew them. I can’t think of another period book that is so complete and far reaching that so graciously illustrates this important field of aviation history.

Ellington Field

This famed aircraft landing field was constructed in 1917 (one year before this book was published). It is 18 miles east of Houston, Texas. The first aircraft flew from Ellington on November 27, 1917. It was originally established for pilot and bombardier training. The base was closed in 1920 and by 1930 the only remains were the concrete water tower and some concrete slabs on which small hangars once stood. In 1916, congress authorized a program to rebuild Ellington. The new base was occupied in the spring of 1941 and thousands of pilots, navigators, and bombardiers were trained there during WWII. In 1984, the base was turned over to the city of Houston to be operated as a municipal airport. Once again Ellington Field operated! It continued to provide support for military reserve and guard units as well as NASA and the Grumman Corporation for their aerospace activities. Obviously this volume was one of many that were sold in 1918 by the administrators of the Ellington Field historical society to people who were involved in World War One aviation. It was priced at $3 and was a great keepsake of the period. I would think a copy when found almost a hundred years old today would be a very rare and historically important find indeed. This archival treasure should be preserved and cherished by collectors.

PRICE: $285.00

 

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

 

Special Lodge Sword of the Patriarchs Militant Branch of the Odd Fellows (Item USARTICLES 3-11; ANTWEP 4-15)

DESCRIPTION: First formed by military veterans as the Patriarchal right after the U.S. Civil War. This was a particular branch of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and it was recognized as its highest branch in 1885. The name “Patriarchal Militant” conveys the two-fold idea of peace and soldiery valor. The motto of the degree is “Justitia Universalis” (Universal Justice) and the battle cry is “Aut Pax Aut Bellum” (“Either Peace or War”). On the pommel of the sword is the globe-looking sphere with a band running all around it with the name of the organization on it. The grip has black, wire-wrapped leather and the crossguard is formed of crossed Roman gladius swords. What else? Did we not say they were militaristic? What could be more so than the trusty sword of the Roman Legionnaires with their famed eagle-head grips? On the scabbard can be seen a highly decorative plaque employing a human hand that displays the Roman gladius once again. The blade has the officer’s name that looks to be D. Robinett. The rest of the engraving is typical depicting floral patterns and row of tents as used by crusaders of old. Along with these temporary abodes are shown Templar-type knights standing ready for battle. The blade shows much age and distress, but the figures are discerned. This sword is almost extinct in collectors’ circles. This is the first one we have seen, in fact. You will see numerous lodge swords of the Freemasons, Knights of Columbus, Mystic Knights of the Sea Lodge, the regular Odd Fellows, and even the Ku Klux Klan, but a sword like this, almost never. So we feel we are offering a rarity here and the Roman Gladius theme as the military to me is rather interesting and makes this an important piece of American history.

PRICE: $450.00

 

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
Closeup of pearl grips.

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
The "dent"

Sword
The scabbard tip

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

 U.S. Infantry Officer’s Sword with Counterguard and Indianhead Pommel (Item USARTICLES 3-12; ANTWEP 4-5)

DESCRIPTION:  This was one of the most elaborate swords of the 1821-1850 period. It was a very interesting variation of the regulation infantry officer’s sword with the large counterguard, which was worn with the Regulations of 1821. It was the Indianhead pommel that set it apart from the others. The specimen we offer is a relatively early example of this type. The blade of this sword is straight and single edged with a false edge extending back 12 ½ inches from the point. There is a wide and deep fuller which runs from the Ricasso to the beginning of the false edge. The blade was originally blued for a portion of its length and decorated with fine line, gilt etching and portions of this etching are still very visible and there are floral designs and possibly military trophies. The grip is composed of two plaques of mother of pearl fastened on either side of a wooden core. Both perfect and unbroken. These plaques are deeply incised with grooves to hold the gilt wire wrapping. The top and bottom of the core between the two plaques are covered with plain, brass strips similarly incised to hold the wire wrap. There is a ferrule at the base of the grips decorated with the conventional leaf and dot design. The pommel is cast with the design of a bust of a female Indian facing to the obverse. The head is surmounted by a circular feather headdress. The baroque knuckle-bow, which attaches to the shoulder of the Indian is decorated with floral-leaf design in nice relief. The counterguard which turns sharply forward over the blade is decorated in high relief with another seated Indian figure with a palm tree affect above it. If viewed closely you can see the Revolution stocking cap and to the left is seen the American Federal eagle. Emitting from this is the quillion that ends with the head of an eagle. All metal parts of this sword are brass. The sword is nearly identical to the one shown in the book by Harold L. Peterson, The American Sword 1775-1945, page 77, with illustration on page 76. There are small differences as to the knuckle guard and counterguard. However, with the one shown in Peterson’s book and this one offered here would be that this one we offer has the original scabbard and the one in the book does not. The scabbard is also an artful creation of the times. It employs a wistful pattern of stamped floral design applied to several areas on the obverse, while the reverse is quite plain. It has two carrying rings and the frog stud for different carry modes. The sword measures 37 inches long in the scabbard. There are about three dents, but only one could be described as deep at all, but it really does not detract from what might be called a particularly beautiful and historically important American sword.

PRICE: SOLD

 

Lusitania

Lusitania

Lusitania

Lusitania

Lusitania

Lusitania

Lusitania

Lusitania
The bronze warning medallion issued by the Germans

 Colorful Tin Badge that would be Presented by the Ship’s Staff of the Ill-Fated and Ill-Famed RMS Lusitania (Item USARTICLES 3-13)

DESCRIPTION:  On June 7, 1906, the RMS Lusitania was launched by the Cunard Line in England, and was the largest passenger ship of the time. This pretty little badge is a relic of a story of official deceit and terrible chicanery by the American and British governments. Nine years later on May 7, 1915, Lusitania sank as a result of being torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of southern Ireland. This opened a doorway to war. Its sinking would become the ostensible reason that America entered the First World War, which also makes it the reason 117,000 young Americans lost their lives. But when one shines the light of truth on the events of the day, and the events leading up to it, the evidence shows undoubtedly that the sinking was planned and assisted by none other than the English and American plotters themselves. They intentionally sent a ship full of Americans to European waters to be sunk by the Germans. In other words, it was a false-flag operation. Subsequent investigation revealed that the major explosions were inside the ship as it was secretly transporting six million pounds of artillery shells and rifle ammunition as well as other explosives on behalf of the Morgan Banking Corporation to help its clients and allies. It was against U.S. laws to transport war materials and passengers in the same ship. But as a result of this insidious plot 1,200 passengers lost their lives. Please go to “False Flag” on your favorite search engine for more of the story

The Badge

The tin badge in blue and gold coloration measures 1 ¾ inches by 2 ½ inches and shows the ship while steaming through the waves with the U.S. federal eagle and its spread wings hovering below. The badge is still attached to the original card it was issued on. The badge is in pretty much perfect shape but the card is a bit the worse for wear (but all there!). There can’t be many of these badges left in the world and historical antiquities regarding this tragic event are very scarce.

PRICE: $125.00

 

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
The Klan at play about 1925

Sword
The Klan marches in Washington, 1925

Sword

 Original Sword of the Ku Klux Klan (Item USARTICLES 3-14; ANTWEP 4-9; MASON 1-3)

DESCRIPTION:  Here is something you will not encounter every day. We have seen two of them in the past fifty years. Now we were able to buy two of them here in Georgia from a man whose grandpa used to work in the foundry that turned them out in the 1920s and 1930s. The sword has the traditional crossguard with the hooded rider on horseback with the fiery cross, while the reverse has the letters “KKK.” The scabbards are in a painted black finish. This is the full dress sword for a KKK leader. The pommel has a knight’s head as seen on other fraternal organizations of the times. The grip is in black-painted wood; it has a straight blade in very good condition. The lower silver boot (fitting) has a draped U.S. flag (bunting style.) The two swords are in great, unused condition. The swords are three feet long in scabbard and the blade measures 28 inches long. There is no maker’s mark on the blade and there never was on any of them we ever have seen. The Ku Klux Klan is the name of three distinct past and present movements in the United States that embrace white nationalism, anti-immigration, and Christian values, as they saw them. Their history was often expressed through actions against groups or individuals whom they opposed. All three movements have called for the purification of American Society. The first Klan flourished in the southern United States in the late 1860s and vehemently opposed the Republican state governments in the South during the horrid reconstructions era sometimes using vigilantes against Negro leaders with numerous chapters across the South. Members made their own often-colorful regalia, robes, masks, and conical headgear designed ostensibly to be fearsome and terrifying and to hide identities. The second group was founded in 1915 and flourished nationwide in the early and mid 1920s, particularly in urban areas of the West and Midwest and it stressed opposition to the Catholic Church’s involvement with the U.S. Government. It managed cross burnings and mass parades, and also opposed Jews. This second organization adopted a standard white costume and used similar code words as the Klan of old. The leader’s sword we offer here is from this second period and probably would have been part of the full-dress uniform of a Grand Dragon (Klan Leader). The sword is in perfect mint condition throughout and is a real rarity. "

PRICE: $850.00; A great bargain! Others have been offered at even a bit less or often more money, but they are not in the condition of these two rarities.

 

Civil War Surrender
Initial greeting by General Joseph Johnston, C.S.A., and Major-General William Sherman, U.S.A.,
at Bennett Place in Durham, North Carolina

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender
General Joseph E. Johnston, C.S.A.

Civil War Surrender
Document in frame

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender
Johnston in postwar years

Civil War Surrender
The grave of General Johnston

Civil War Surrender
William Tecumseh Sherman: a man without a soul

Civil War Surrender
Sherman and his plunderbund

Civil War Surrender
It was the Bennett house that the surrender terms were discussed in April 1865.

Civil War Surrender
It was at this desk that the surrender terms were signed.

Civil War Surrender
Postage stamp honoring Joseph E. Johnston

Civil War Surrender
The grotesque war criminal, William T. Sherman

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender
A period drawing of the surrender

 FANTASTIC!!!!
Here it was, the end of the War of Yankee Aggression and the Second War of Independence: (Civil??? War)
(Item USARTICLES 3-15; SPECIAL ITEMS)

DESCRIPTION:  This is a transcribed, hand-written, general order announcing the prior day’s surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston’s noble Army of Tennessee to the U.S. Army war criminal Major General William T. Sherman. In the general order signed near Greensboro, North Carolina, on April 27, 1865, one of the finest field commanders of the entire war, announced to his beloved and loyal troops his surrender to Sherman based on terms agreed upon the day before. The order reads as follows:

Headquarters Army of Tennessee near Greensboro, N.C., April 27, 1865
General Orders No. 18.
By the terms of a military convention made on the 26th inst by Maj. General W. T. Sherman U.S.A., and Joseph E. Johnston C.S.A. the officers and men of this army are to bind themselves not to take up arms against the United States until properly relieved from that obligation, and shall receive guarantees from the United States [officers against Molestation by the United States.*] authorities so long as they observe that obligation and the laws in force within reason where they reside. For these objects duplicate muster rolls will be made immediately and after distribution of the necessary papers the troops will march under their officers to their respective states and there be disbanded all retaining personal property.
The object of this convention is pacification to the extent of the authority of the commanders who made it. Events in Virginia, which broke every hope of success by war, imposed on its general the duty of sparing the blood of this gallant army and saving our country from further devastation, and our people from ruin. (Signed) J.E. Johnston General OFFICIAL A Anderson A. A. Genl.

The document measures 7 x 9 inches; frame, 13 1/2 x 11 1/2 inches. Those two lines of writing that are difficult to read are the result of a tear that was repaired many years ago by someone who evidently thought that the clear tape would never yellow (the sins of the fathers). Johnston held the rank of brigadier general as an officer in the U.S. Army and accepted this same rank as an officer of the Confederate States Army, and held it during the Battle of First Manassas in July 1861. The next month, Johnston was promoted to the rank of general. In fact, rank wise, he was senior to Sherman, who was a major general.) This amazing man was always in the thick of the fighting and never experienced a direct defeat. He was a brilliant strategist of the first order, while on the other hand Sherman was not a competent field soldier. He retreated before outnumbered Confederate troops. He failed at Vicksburg and Kennesaw Mountain (beaten up there by Johnston). He failed at Chattanooga as Patrick Cleburne blocked Sherman’s advance. Was he effective? Yes, as an ISIS-style criminal terrorist. He was good at turning his vicious vandals loose on the southern properties, their women, and firing our beautiful Dixie. However, his brutal campaign of burning and plunder lost the peace more than it won the war leading to decades, even centuries of southern bitterness toward Northerners and was the only way Sherman could win a battle. Johnston goes down in truly bespoken history as one of the true patriots and heroes of our real America, while William T. Sherman seen in his true light was a scallywag and without a doubt, a war criminal personified! Take a look at his demon face; the hunchback Quasimodo was better looking and a better man. The document is very nicely framed in museum mounting with special protective glass. The document is free mounted within and not glued. Don’t miss this one; it’s very special!

PRICE: SOLD

 

Naval sword

Naval sword

Naval sword

Naval sword

Naval sword

Naval sword

Naval sword

Naval sword

Naval sword
Cutlass drill aboard a full-rigged corvette in 1863

Naval sword
A young able seaman of the period

 U.S. Navy Model M1841 Cutlass (Item USARTICLES 3-16; ANTWEP 4-13)

DESCRIPTION:  This broad cutlass was patterned after the U.S. 1832 Foot Artillery sword and is almost an exact duplicate of the French 1816 Foot Artillery sword. This sword was needed at the time to wield deadly force on pitching and rolling decks in the face of mortal combat. Only 6,600 of these swords were ever produced and just prior to the Civil War they were replaced with the more popular M1861 (aka M1860) naval cutlass of which 24,000 were produced. There are not that many of these cutlasses available, but they show up from time to time and are truly rare and an important relic of American history that is more than 175 years old. This has all of its aged natural patina; it does have a few small battle nicks. It’s obvious that it saw naval combat. It was undoubtedly made by Ames, but through honest age and use the Ames name has long ago rusted away. The rust is also old and controlled and the blade looks fine. The D-guard is only slightly bent where almost every other example of these rare swords that we have seen, the D-guards are somewhat radically bent. The sword has no scabbard. This is not at all unusual as many of the swords were issued sans scabbard, as they were “rack swords” that were mounted ready for use on the bulkheads of the armory on the war frigates of the U.S. Navy. The stampings that record the sword’s position on the ship is also gone with years of polishing. No inspector’s marks are visible, either. The American federal eagle on the pommel is there and still sharp. The fish-scale design on the grip gives a good handhold for the sword’s wielder. Its overall length is 26 ½ inches with a blade length of 21. The lethal look of the sword is similar to the famed gladius, the Roman Legionnaires’ shortsword. This great piece of American history is reasonably priced.

PRICE: SOLD

 

Sword

Sword

Sword
The carvings > > >

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
The tip of the cane

Sword

Sword
The name of the maker or the owner in N.Y.

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
The lethal point

Sword

Sword

 Fabulous American Sword Cane circa Mid-19th Century (Item USARTICLES 3-17; ANTWEP 4-14)

DESCRIPTION:  Here is a delightful sword cane. It was made as such and not constructed from a sword or rapier. In gold letters on the blued blade are the words “D. Klanberg Newyork” (sic), along with some floral and other designs. It has a triangular shape with a cutting edge on the under portion (lethal indeed). The sword when in the cane stock or mount measure 35 inches long. The blade is 16 inches long. The handle of this cane is of bone; possibly whale bone or walrus tusk. It is ornately hand carved with a hunter’s hat, knife, a flintlock musket, a hunter’s trophy bag, and a powder horn. The handle is comprised of three separate sections of beautifully carved bone. The throat where the sword blade fits into is silver capped, as is the tip of the cane’s bottom. Yes, there is the usual age cracking that has fully stopped many years ago and the handle is firm and steady. The name “D. Klanberg” may be the company name of the firm that produced the blade or it could be the name of the gentleman who owned and carried it, but for sure it is a top-quality weapon for the man who insisted on defending himself. This is a rare and rather exotic weapon and would have been an absolute necessity when a gentleman might be walking in such areas of N.Y. City in the 1860s and ‘70s like the area known as “Hell’s Kitchen.”

PRICE: $2,500.00; this one is museum quality and ultrarare indeed

 

Musket

Musket

Dug-up Flintlock Musket Lock Plate (Item USARTICLES 3-18; ANTWEP 4-18)

DESCRIPTION: This was found in a dig many years ago near Fort Niagara on the eastern bank of the Niagara River at its mouth on Lake Ontario. The location was a fortification originally built to protect the interests of New France in North America. First built in 1678 the fort played an important part in the French and Indian War and fell to the British in a nineteen-day siege in July of 1759. This is called “The Battle of Fort Niagara.” The commander of the post surrendered the fort to British commander Sir William Johnson (Johnston), who initially led the New York Militia. The Ulster Irish-born Johnson won the day and the fort remained in British hands for the next thirty-seven years. It served as a loyalist base in New York during the American Revolutionary War for Colonel John Butler and his Butler’s Rangers, the Tory militia under the command of the British army. Lt. Col. William Stacy of the American Continental Army was captured at the attack on Cherry Valley, New York, by Butler’s Rangers. He was held captive at Ft. Niagara during the summer of 1779. Niagara became notorious for drinking, brawling, whoring, and cheating, crude taverns, stores and bordellos spouted on “the bottom,” the riverside flat below the fort. American forces occupied the fort in 1796.

The Lock

This is a typical lock from one of the flintlock muskets of that period. It was dug up in the 1920s near that area known as “the bottom” when it was still possible and legal to dig there. It was in the personal collections of at least two citizens of Buffalo, N.Y. and finally in the possession of a man from Jamestown, N.Y., who died a few years ago. It is, of course, highly rusted, but retains its shape nevertheless. The cock, frizzen, and lock plate are all there. Even the tabs for attachments are present. From our experience in handling eighteenth-century long arms we want to assume that this piece is from a Charleville musket, which was the standard flintlock weapon issued to French troops throughout the 18th century. The lock was found without the barrel or any other fittings when the archeological dig was made; some French military buttons and pewter cups and coins were unearthed nearby. So, it remains a mystery of sorts, but it is a scarce item as dug-up items ever go.

PRICE: $250.00; what a terrific desk ornament or an interesting knick-knack if framed

 

Holster

Holster

Holster

Holster
The back

Holster
The tip of the holster

Holster
Note the holster on the man on the left.

Holster

Holster

Holster

 WWI Holster for the Model 1917 Colt Revolver (Item USARTICLES 3-19)

DESCRIPTION:  The model 1917 revolvers were carried in what appears to be a slight modification of the 1909 holster, which was in turn modeled after the 1902 half-flap, butt forward, cavalry-style holster with a four-inch belt loop. The model 1917 holster did not have the web gear belt hook like the model 1912 and model 1914 holsters. The holster is in a russet-brown color like most of the standard-issue leather goods. The front of the holster has the large stamped “US” in an oval framing. The bottom of the holster has the ring attachment for the leg thong; the remnants of one can be seen attached and was likely added by the original wearer. On the back flap there is a stamp that reads “G.&K. 1917 A.G.” The holster is in very nice condition with minor scratches here and there that do not detract from its overall good looks. This is an original piece of good Americana, harkening back to the “War to end all wars.”

PRICE: $250.00

 

 

Cartridge Belt

Cartridge Belt

Cartridge Belt
This Texas stamp can be seen just inside the open lid

Cartridge Belt
This is on the side of the box

Cartridge Belt
More stamps

Cartridge Belt
The underside

Cartridge Belt
The back

Cartridge Belt
Shows use; still strong

 Mod. 1874 Indian Wars McKeever Cartridge Box; Third Pattern (Texas Marked) (Item USARTICLES 3-20)

DESCRIPTION:  This pattern cartridge box was used by the U.S. Army in the Plains Indian Wars such as the Red River War of 1874. (Search “Texas beyond history Red River War”). In the summer of that year the U.S. Army launched a campaign to remove the Comanche, Kiowa, Southern Cheyenne, and Arapaho indian tribes from the Southern Plains and enforce their relocation to reservations in Indian Territory. The Red River War led to an end of an entire way of life for the plains tribes and brought a new chapter in Texas history. In the bloody conflict that followed there were as many as 20 engagements between the U.S. Army and the Southern Plains Indians that took place across the Texas panhandle. The well-equipped army kept the Indians on the run until eventually they could not run or fight any longer. The Red River War officially ended in June 1875, when Quanah Parker and his band of Quahadi Comanche entered Fort Sill and surrendered. The noble red men were defeated and would never again freely roam the buffalo plains. The Texas Militia was deeply involved in this war of U.S. genocide. This McKeever cartridge box is marked in two places: “State of Texas” and “Rock Island Arsenal 1908.” We believe the latter date was a reissue confirmation. The box is in very good condition and the Texas connection makes it a very rare and desirable relic, indeed.

PRICE: $450.00

 

Needlepoint George Washington

Needlepoint George Washington

Needlepoint George Washington

Needlepoint George Washington

Needlepoint George Washington

Needlepoint George Washington
Incredible petit point

Needlepoint George Washington

 Antique Needlepoint Portrait of George Washington in its Original-Period Frame (Item USARTICLES 3-21)

DESCRIPTION:  Here is a spectacular early American needlepoint portrait of the first president and great leader of the Colonial armies in the American Revolutionary War. In this great depiction the outer palm design is created in needlepoint while the picture of Washington is incredibly accomplished in petit point. If you’re not familiar with petit point, it is generally considered a very tiny needlepoint stitch. This weaving form was especially used in the distant past in fine tapestries to achieve fine, excellent detail. A portrait of a human face could hardly be accomplished with authenticity in needlepoint. Here we have the great man depicted in genuine eighteenth-century petit point embroidery bringing a remarkable likeness to the great subject. He is seen in a period frame measuring 36 x 22 inches and the needlework and petit point picture is 28 x 24 inches. There is a likelihood that this was done during Washington’s lifetime or in commemoration of his death. After his funeral, some of the finest artists in the world, especially in America, created various art depictions of America’s hero. This piece shows amazing talent and supreme workmanship and I somehow doubt it could be duplicated today. It is definitely old and why do we think it was period? If anyone goes beyond its obvious artistic quality and turns it over to the back they will see that the mounting looks absolutely as it should look being from about 1800 up to the 1860s. The obvious age of the framing as seen here would be in our estimation pretty much impossible to duplicate, and we believe it is positively the original framing. This is positively a museum relic extraordinaire!!! Special wrapping will be required.

PRICE: $3,800.00

 

Military Photographs

Military Photographs

Military Photographs

Military Photographs

Military Photographs

Military Photographs

Military Photographs

Military Photographs

Military Photographs

Military Photographs

Military Photographs

 Genuine Press Release Photos–U.S. Military (Item USARTICLES 3-22)

DESCRIPTION:  We will not list or show all of these individually, but they are all very nice, clear, press-release photos from various news agencies including a release from Life magazine. There are nineteen in all. The photographs seem to be from WW2, Vietnam, Korea, et al. A few of them have markings for the press chiefs who notated them for various presentations. Some of them say “released for publication” and some say “not for publication.” We will do a couple or three group shots to give you an idea of what they are like. Almost all are in top condition and there are some very interesting subjects involved here. Some of them were most likely never published.

PRICE: SOLD

 

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

Photo Album MacArthur

 Album of Original Photos of General MacArthur’s Visit to Yugoslavia in 1931 (Item USARTICLES 3-23)

DESCRIPTION: This marvelous album consists of the leather covers with 41 great photos of the general who was at that time the U.S. Army Chief of Staff on the occasion of his visit to Yugoslavia. The photography was accomplished by U.S. Major Hazeltine, who was most probably a later relative of the famed photographers George and Martin Hazeltine, who were working from the 1860s up to the 1920s. The greater part of the photographs measure 7 x 9 1/2 inches and for the most part are crystal clear. There are several close-up portraitures of the general within the album. Some of the pictures are quite candid in that they are slightly out of focus, but this occurs only in a few instances because all of the rest of the pictures are quite clear. In the last couple of pages, there are four pictures that measure 9 x 4 inches. These are of the Yugoslavian airfield. Throughout the album, General MacArthur is seen with many Yugoslavian military officials. In the very last couple of pages, there are four more 9 x 4 images. Along with this album, the former collector inserted a print depicting General MacArthur. Unfortunately, there is quite a bit of foxing on it but its message plaque says: “General Douglas MacArthur, soldier, leader, beloved by his men an inspiration to all.” These are 100-percent original photographer’s prints. There may not be another album like this anywhere in any archival collection. UNIQUE? YES, I WOULD THINK SO. This is a historically pertinent item and is of immense historical value.

PRICE: $1,500.00

 

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

 Absolutely Gorgeous and Magnificent Early American Sword (Item USARTICLES 3-24; ANTWEP 4-28)

DESCRIPTION: Here we offer one of the finest American swords that we have ever seen. It is by the notable silversmith John Sayre in New York who worked from 1810 to 1831. The closest example we have found to a description is in the book The American Sword, 1775-1945. On page 108 figure #99 the author Harold L. Peterson shows a mounted artillery officer’s saber 1820-1840. The one he shows is similar to the sword we offer having a carved-bone grip with a tight hand-checkered pattern. Also, see the book known as The American Eagle Pommel Sword: The Early Years 1794-1830. On page 176, figure 44.b, the author E. Andrew Mowbray shows an artillery officer’s saber 1815-20. Although the sword shown is an eagle-head-pommel style the illustration shows a sword that is otherwise very similar to the one we offer. Also in the same book in the color section there is another sword that is similar to ours and with a heavily engraved scabbard. Mr. Mowbray claims this is a presentation-quality American dress saber. The languet, however, is plain where ours bears the highly decorative American-eagle motif. The sword he describes has the similar gilded etching on a blued background. Of course, we know that this sword that we have is unique, but we attempted to find one similar of the same general pattern. Swords such as this were worn by light-artillery officers as early as the opening years of the War of 1812, and this sword could very possibly be that early. Staff officers of the branches authorized to wear a saber also favored this form until 1832, when they were required to wear straight swords, and militia officers of many branches of service adopted it. It was superseded in 1840 by a new model. The curved blade is single edged. The upper part of the blade is blued and it is ornamented with a military trophy, the US Coat of Arms. (Federal Eagle). There are two bright panels with varying floral motifs. The knuckle bow is of the reverse “P” pattern decorated with leaf design and beaded ornamentation. All metal parts of the hilt are gilded brass as is the scabbard, which is heavily etched with floral decoration and an American eagle in take-off flight pattern. The tip of the scabbard is also etched with oak-leaf motive running about six inches up. The suspension on the scabbard is provided by two carrying rings. The crossguard is not engraved. There is a ferrule at the base of the grips and it is surmounted by a back strap. The overall length of the sword is a little over three feet. The condition is really excellent, no apparent dents. The American-eagle languet is repeated on both sides of the grip. On the rim of the back of the blade are the initials of the maker: “J.S & co.” The gilt National Eagle and floral designs are very outstanding. The blade does show some nicks almost as if used in combat. One of the blade escutcheons on the reverse side is a potpourri of various colonial weapons and a regimental drum. The pommel is decorated with heavy floral design. This is an extremely significant American sabre worthy of a prestigious collection or museum display.

PRICE: $12,000.00: a great bargain indeed; however, the consigner has decided to make it an even GREATER bargain and reduced it to $9,000.00

 

Bronze Eagle

Bronze Eagle

 

Bronze Eagle

Bronze Eagle

Bronze Eagle

Bronze Eagle

Very Large Early American Colonial Eagle in Bronze (Item USARTICLES 3-25; EAGLE 1-5)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a truly beautiful bronze sculpture probably produced in the mid nineteenth century. This eagle is of the style and type used in courtrooms and sometimes in legal offices. Eagles like this often graced patriotic meeting places. The eagle sits on a ball that is said to represent the globe and the pursuit of justice throughout the world. Wings tip to tip measure 24 inches, and is 15 inches high. The base is 8 x 8 x 2 inches. This bird is quite heavy, weighing in at about 40 pounds. The figure is mounted on a piece of wood. Originally, it could have been mounted on a marble base or even a metal pole-like implement (long gone). If this makes its way to a good collection then it deserves to have a marble plinth fitted to it (author’s suggestion). This is truly a great and historically important relic of the early times in America.

PRICE: $2,800.00.

 

Scrimshaw

Scrimshaw

Scrimshaw

Scrimshaw
The Royal Britannic seal

Scrimshaw

Scrimshaw

Scrimshaw
Wooden endcap

Scrimshaw
Wooden stopper

Scrimshaw
Carver's mark and statement

Great Hand-Carved Replica of a Historic Scrimshaw Powder Horn (Item USARTICLES 3-26; RECMUSEUM 1-11)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a beautiful little powder horn accomplished with genuine scrimshaw work. This piece was copied from an original horn in a New York museum. The man who carved it was one of the best workers in this medium. The horn bears the British royal crest with the royal motto, crown, lion, and unicorn. Seen near the endcap is the statement that reads “His Horn made at Albany, Octr 5 1757,” and he adds the footnote “Sucess [sic] for Britain.” (Someone noticed the spelling mistake and “corrected” it by scratching the second “c” above.) This would have been a theme from the French and Indian War. There is also a central design of an eighteenth-century gentleman or soldier accompanied by his gaily bedecked wife. Other floral designs appear including a winged angel, a potted plant surrounded by birds, etc. The endcap is carved in a floral design from wood. The stopper end is also carved in wood. Part of the horn worn nearest the clothing of the owner is a bit worn and possibly one word or so is obliterated but this really doesn’t affect the overall look and beauty of the this possibly one-of-a-kind artist creation. The length measures about one foot long and the diameter of the endcap is about two inches. Were it not for the newness of the woodcarving of the cap and stopper one would think this to be the real McCoy.

PRICE: $450.00

 

Wood Carving

 

Wood Carving

Wood Carving

Wood Carving

Wood Carving

 

Carved Wood Tobacco Humidor that Depicts a Skull with a Snake (Item USARTICLES 3-27; WOODMASTER 1-11)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a primitive American woodcarving that is a tobacco humidor in the shape of a human skull with a viper slithering through the eye sockets and getting ready to devour a toad. It is clever how the artist depicted the snake whose goal is to imbibe the toad. The measurement with cap is 7½ inches high. The opening for tobacco refilling is about 4 inches in diameter. The skull has a removable cap upon which the toad sits. Part of the snake’s body serves as a handle of sorts. This is a very interesting piece of American primitive art; a rather macabre art object, but nonetheless interesting.

PRICE: $450.00

 

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

 Circa 1812 American Eagle-Head Sword (Item USARTICLES 3-27; ANTWEP 4-29)

DESCRIPTION: Here is the typical “Standish Barry” eagle pommel sword as they were made in France for the American market during the early years of the 19th century. They always have the well-formed eagle-head pommel as their most notable feature. This entire sword’s design markedly suggests a date of manufacture no earlier than 1803. In the book The American Eagle Pommel Sword: The Early Years 1794-1830, author E. Andrew Mowbray shows three Standish Barry swords on pages 138 and 139. The sword pictured to the right of page 139 looks like the one we offer in closest similarity due to the eagle motif on the languet and the designs on the scabbard. However, both the swords shown have features that approximate our sword. The blade is undoubtedly of German Solingen manufacture. The grip is in the finest carved and incised bone in the finest tradition of this work. The blade decoration, particularly the deep etching, generous gilding, and the “Frenchified” motif is obvious and is of extremely high order. The blade has among other motifs the revolutionary cap dear to French “patriots.” The American eagle is shown again on the blade as he is on the languet, but in flight instead of perched, and he climbs from a scene of crossed standards that support the American flag shield. Also displayed is a grouping of weapons: swords, muskets, etc. The scabbard fittings are particularly ornate with floral design that sort of jumps out at you. About 1½ inches upward of the brass boot design of the scabbard it looks to have been polished with a grinder and it took out a very small part of the design at that point. Thankfully, the malefactor saw the problem being created and ceased this foolish endeavor. This does not really affect the beauty of this otherwise magnificently beautiful sword. It measures about 35 inches long in its scabbard. The leather of the scabbard is in what we would say excellent considering it is about 120 years old. Here surely is a grand and rather glorious piece of American military history.

PRICE: $3,500.00

 

Flag

Flag

Flag

Flag

Flag

Flag
The guidon

Flag
See on the guidon

Flag
Seen on the guidon

 U.S. Army Military Police Flag (Item USARTICLES 3-28)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a really beautiful flag as used in parade formations by the U.S. Army Military Police. It has a tag that says that it’s “American made.” We think it was a Viet-Nam-era flag. It’s beautifully made and remember, it’s an American-made piece (NOT FROM PAKISTAN). It measures 57 x 35 inches and the applique design and other trappings all look to be handmade. In the eagle’s chest, you can see the crossed key and fasces symbol of the military police. Above the eagle are the crossed flintlock pistols; another symbol of the police corps and under the eagle is a banner proclaiming “Military Police Corps”. Along with it is an official guidon that identifies the particular unit. The guidon measures about 26 x 20 and evidently has been washed a few time, but is in very good shape. All together, this makes for quite an impressive display.

PRICE: $250.00

 

Flying Pin

Flying Pin

Flying Pin

Flying Pin
USAAF Officer’s service cap

Flying Pin
Poster for recruitment

Flying Pin
USAAF Enlisted-man’s tunic

 U.S. Army Air Force Sweetheart Pin (Vintage) (Item USARTICLES 3-29)

DESCRIPTION: This is the type sent home to wives and sweethearts from the front by the flyboys, who were daily and nightly bombing civilian targets in Germany. It measures a little over two inches long and is clearly marked “STERLING” on the back of the roundel. This is not a reproduction. It is the real McCoy.

PRICE: $75.00

 


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Contact Us

Please refer to item designator in parentheses in all correspondence.

Please E-mail for any additional information you may need.

If you prefer, contact 'Germania' at PO Box 68, Lakemont, GA 30552
or call at 706.782.1668 or 706.782.4398.


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