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Watercolor of Schloss Neuschwanstein by Adolf Hitler With Strong, Official Provenance and Expertise

 

Hitler Painting
Actual watercolor by Adolf Hitler

Hitler Painting
Adolf Hitler's signature as seen on the painting

Hitler Painting
Castle in a recent photograph

Hitler Painting
Side view of castle as it stands, today

Hitler Painting
Interior room

Hitler Painting
More of castle's interior

Hitler Painting
Another interior view

Hitler Painting
The throne wall

Hitler Painting
The vestibule

Hitler Painting
Ludwig II, the Bavarian king who created Schloss Neuschwanstein

Hitler Painting
Richard Wagner, the man Schloss Neuschwanstein was dedicated to

Hitler Painting
Another example of Hitler's artwork

Hitler Painting
Another example of Hitler's artwork

Hitler Painting
Another example of Hitler's artwork

Hitler Painting
This is the book by Billy Price on the paintings of Adolf Hitler. It is the only complete book so far published on the subject, and both of the paintings we offer are listed and pictured (the very ones!).

Hitler Painting
Here is the watercolor of the castle in black and white as shown in the book.

Hitler Painting
The castle on page 181 of Billy Price's book.

 

 

Hitler Painting
Hitler’s signature changed over the years. Authentic watercolors by him have been seen with several of his varied signatures (No two were ever alike.). Please understand that not all the signatures pictured in this image are from paintings, but they are from Billy Price's book Adolf Hitler: The Unknown Artist. Those signatures in rows 4 and 5 are actually from Hitler's various watercolors. Note that the third one in row 5 is nearly identical to the one on the castle painting as seen above.

 

Hitler Painting

Hitler Painting
Here is the picture of the painting with notary seals secured to the back of the official statement (on the left) by Peter Jahn

 Watercolor by Adolf Hitler With Strong, Official Provenance and Expertise (Item AH 28-13; ART 17-22; SPECIAL ITEM)

DESCRIPTION:  Recently, we were very fortunate to purchase two paintings by Adolf Hitler that are actually considered among his best. This first one shown here is an absolutely gorgeous rendering of the Castle of King Ludwig II of Bavaria—Schloss Neuschwanstein (New Swanstone Castle). This is a nineteenth-century Romanesque Revival palace. It was built by King Ludwig II as a devout homage to the great composer Richard Wagner, whom he practically worshipped. Therefore, it only follows that Adolf Hitler, who was also a devoted fan of the great Wagner would seek to honor him. It seems only logical, therefore, that New Swanstone Castle would be a natural for the young Hitler to paint at some time in his artistic career and, in my estimation, his infatuation with Wagner would have enthused him to positively strain to make this fantastic watercolor one of his finest works. The majesty of the castle as seen in Hitler’s painting is spellbinding and all who have seen it have praised it not only because it is Hitler’s work, but the painting itself emerges as a classic example of fine art of the Western world. Yes, it’s that great! Crude propagandist authors have said that Hitler was only a “house painter” before he became Germany’s leader. I am sure you have heard or seen that ignorant old canard more than once. Well, dear reader, this is one of the “houses” he painted. So just like all the other lies told about the German Führer this one needs to be trashed as well, wouldn’t you agree? We at Germania are proud as peacocks to offer this (dare I say: “masterpiece?”). “Yes, I dare!” Of all the watercolors painted by Hitler, this is one of the largest we have seen. The only full and significant literary work dealing with Hitler’s paintings is titled Adolf Hitler: The Unknown Artist by Billy F. Price, and this painting is shown on page 181 of the book and is listed as plate number 6/100. Where it is shown it says it was painted in 1914 and I think it may have been among the last renderings he produced before enlisting in the Bavarian Army and going off to war. He still found some time to paint a few Munich scenes during that period. Painting was his favorite thing in life and with high hopes, he took the examination to attend art school. To his complete disappointment, he and 85 other candidates failed the exam and were denied entrance to the prestigious Vienna Academy of Fine Arts. Today, we know that the test was stacked against the candidates; the required subjects of the exam were rather strange and the judges may have been rather prejudiced toward certain applicants from “select families.” We will never know, but when one views either of the paintings that we at Germania have procured and offer, there is not a shadow of a doubt that the young Adolf possessed a genius in architectural mastery in the arts. Just as he had opinions in the political arena and in the winning strategy in warfare (Blitzkrieg) his opinions and thoughts about art were strong and rather far beyond conservative. He believed strongly that “healthy art” had a “healthy soul.” He claimed it should be uplifting, noble, and idealistic. He considered certain themes such as the family, everyday work, mythology, rural life, and landscapes, the perfected human body, or the heroic soldier to be subjects worthy of art even though we know that depicting people was, as he admitted, not his specialty by any means. Of course, his ideas about the refinement of art seriously conflicted with the emerging schools of modern art forms, Impressionism, Cubism, Dadaism, et al. He claimed these terrible aberrations were produced by “scribblers, canvas crawlers, mental defectives, or cultural Neanderthals.” (Well put, Mein Führer!!!) Cicero said: “If we are not ashamed to think it, we should not be ashamed to say it.” So, I will say it also: “I agree with every word Hitler used in his critique of modern art.” Hitler’s architectural concepts were based upon his belief in “eternal values.” These values can be obviously perceived in his artistic works. These values contained mixed elements of classism, the renaissance, and the baroque all of which were amalgamated in the “Vienna Ring Style." This monumental expression of the 19th-century imperial power may well have been the most significant architectural feeling generated in Hitler’s youth. He was acutely impressed with so many masterpieces of the building sciences as could be seen in Vienna such as the Burgtheater, the Votive Church, city hall, and Theophil von Hansen’s great Austrian Parliament building. Hitler knew these buildings down to their finest details and painted them repeatedly.

One of Hitler's favorites, which he painted several times, was Karlskirche, St. Charles’s Church, and this one also was one of the favorites of art researcher and authority Peter Jahn. This is the second Hitler canvas that we offer and is an original rendering of Karlskirche. Peter Jahn of Vienna and Dr. August Priesack were considered the leading experts able to authenticate the paintings of Adolf Hitler. In 1935, the historical section of the NSDAP official archives in Munich was assigned the systematic task of locating and certifying the paintings of Adolf Hitler. Two archivists, Wilhelm Dammann and Dr. August Priesack, worked together and were responsible for authenticating all Hitler artwork that could be traced, purchased, or borrowed. The actual search for the art was carried out by staff members under the auspices of Hitler’s deputy Rudolf Hess. One authority that I mentioned earlier was Peter Jahn. He and Dr. Priesack were the last surviving experts in the NSDAP search for Hitler’s art. Jahn had many conversations with Hitler considering art in general, but particularly the Führer’s own art. With this painting of the castle there is an official letter of authenticity from Peter Jahn regarding this watercolor in detail. Jahn recalls a conversation with the Reich’s Chancellor himself regarding this particular work, as actually being the largest surviving watercolor by Hitler. The work is in fine condition and measures 23.5 x 15.5 inches. After the war, Jahn resumed his consulting career with no thoughts of his former activities on behalf of the Hess staff. When his name was mentioned in a magazine article in 1960, however, he received inquiries from all over the world and agreed to serve as personal advisor to the English Marquis of Bath when the latter began his large, personal collection. Through his knowledge of Hitler’s Viennese style and subject matter and his numerous contacts in Vienna, Jahn has long been an authority on the subject and has traced and authenticated numerous paintings. His files and references were particularly useful to author Billy Price in writing his great hornbook on the subject Adolf Hitler: The Unknown Artist. Today, this book is one of the few works that covers the subject so thoroughly and interestingly. Both the paintings we acquired are shown in the book, but the Schloss Neuschwanstein canvas is unfortunately depicted in the noncolor section of the book; the St. Charles’s Church in winter, though, is shown in a large picture on page 49 of the price book. Hitler will forever be one of the most famous leaders in the history of mankind and the mystique and fascination surrounding him seem completely unending and if anything, he seems to be becoming more and more popular with his book Mein Kampf clocking a banner digital year in 2013 and 2014 when it became an e-book bestseller on Amazon. The Kindle version of Mein Kampf was ranking way up there on the politics and current events far outpacing books by modern day neoconservatives such as Sarah Palin, Charles Krauthammer, and Glenn Beck. So, if the book and the popularity of his artwork tell us anything beyond what is recorded in the pages of the dubious horror stories out there, it may just occur to some readers today that here was a remarkable individual and artist (a very talented artist) who turned into a “reluctant politician” and military leader whose ultimate aim was the preservation and advancement of his Fatherlands (Germany and Austria) and the creation of a “Great Art” and the preservation and protection of the Aryan culture and architecture. From time to time, we see Hitler’s artistic watercolors being offered in the $10,000 range. In fact, this is a huge underestimate and can only be applied to paintings that are probably fakes or have little or questionable provenance. Genuine Hitler watercolors with good provenance from August Priesack or Peter Jahn have sold from reputable auction house for between $50,000 and $90,000 over the past ten years with about $50 thousand to $60 thousand being brought for an average one in 2011-2013. The two we offer are far beyond average. The authors of several books by persons who sought to denigrate the Führer would invariably show his poorest paintings in their books to portray his works and the renderings as what they dubiously called a “lifeless art form.” So in essence, we are genuinely thrilled to bring forward to you these virtual masterpieces from the brush of the Führer. Not exactly lifeless, are they?!

PRICE: P.O.R.

Hitler Painting
This is the actual watercolor by Adolf Hitler.

Hitler Painting
Adolf Hitler's signature as seen on the painting

Hitler Painting
Another church depiction by Adolf Hitler

Hitler Painting
Hitler’s painting of a southern Bavarian church-1925

Hitler Painting
Another view of the Saint Charles's Church by Hitler-1912

Hitler Painting
The Minorite Church in Vienna-1910-12

Hitler Painting
Saint Stephen's Cathedral in Vienna-1910

Hitler Painting
This is the book by Billy Price on the paintings of Adolf Hitler. It is the only complete book so far published
on the subject, and both of the paintings we offer are listed and pictured (the very ones!).

Hitler Painting
The watercolor of the Vienna church as seen in Billy Price's book on Hitler's art

Hitler Painting
Another picture from Price's book on the art of Adolf Hitler

 

 

Hitler Painting
Hitler’s signature changed over the years. Authentic watercolors by him have been seen with several of his varied signatures (No two were ever alike.). Please understand that not all the signatures pictured in this image are from paintings, but they are from Billy Price's book Adolf Hitler: The Unknown Artist.

Hitler Painting

Hitler Painting
Here is the picture of the painting with notary seals secured to the back of the official statement by Peter Jahn

Here is the expertise and certificate of authenticity by Peter Jahn in reference to this watercolor by Adolf Hitler. Peter Jahn, along with Dr. August Priesack, were the only recognized authorities able to accurately authenticate Hitler paintings. Here in rather broken English Herr Jahn says unalterably that the Karlskirche in Vienna signed by Adolf Hitler and dated 1912 is authentic and he praises it as the second-largest Hitler watercolor he had ever seen and is wonderful in detail and impression. He goes on to say that he considers it to be one of the finest and most naturalistic ones he had ever personally held. He says the background displays high technical expertise and has not seen many of this high quality (Excellent!). In this watercolor one can see Hitler’s great talent as a painter.
After giving a short narrative on his life and career, he goes on to say that this picture is, in his opinion, one of the largest and most beautiful works done by the hand of Adolf Hitler.
The statement is with the signature and official stamps of a notary who notarized Peter Jahn's signature in 1982.
Interesting that Peter Jahn did this statement on April 19, 1982, the day before Hitler’s birthday (Significent?).

 Original Adolf Hitler Watercolor of St. Charles’s Church With Official Provenance and Expertise (Item AH 28-14; ART 17-23; SPECIAL ITEM)

DESCRIPTION:  This is the other watercolor painted by Adolf Hitler that we recently obtained. This is the second one mentioned in the article above in the description of the canvas of the castle of Neuschwanstein. We mentioned in that narrative that there were certain buildings and other pieces of architecture that Hitler truly admired and often painted, and this magnificent depiction of Karl’s Church in Vienna was certainly his favorite subject of all. It shows up in both his sketches and paintings several times among the ones that were found. This piece we offer is a full-blown precious watercolor in all its glory. We have mentioned in the article above that only two experts have had proper credentials for authenticating Hitler watercolors and drawings. They are the late Dr. August Priesack and the late Peter Jahn and were the last surviving experts after the war to honestly authenticate a Hitler painting and such expertise from either man is the singular best authentication and support that any purported Führer art piece can carry. Others have also claimed that they can offer authentication. One such ‘expert’ that I would rather term an “X-Spurt” is Herr Hans Horvath also from Vienna. He has built for himself a completely undeserved reputation as an expert in National Socialist paraphernalia and art. In actuality he is a furniture restorer and perhaps he is good at that trade, but in the role of an authority on Hitler art, I think he had better stick to the sandpaper and glue pot. So, in essence, the singular recognized experts in this field remain the late Dr. Priesack and the late Peter Jahn: all others must be taken with skepticism. The numerous Hitler watercolors and oils that show up are legion, and serious collectors invariably believe only in the ones that bear the Priesack or Jahn credentials. We have explained much about this in the article above regarding the magnificent Schloss Neuschwanstein watercolor. The Karlskirche in Vienna as seen in our accompanying picture just above is also like the other one—accompanied with a provenance and expertise by none other than Peter Jahn with a letter of positive authenticity dated April 19, 1982. According to Jahn, this painting, like the castle rendering, was also one of the largest Hitler watercolors he’d ever seen. The size is 15.75 x 11.5 inches. This is absolutely in my opinion as well, one of the most detailed and crisp examples of Hitler’s work ever located and offered. It is definitely done with watercolor and gouache, boldly signed and dated “1912.” It is in fine condition throughout. The great architectural technique is superb and the people in the depiction are somewhat substantial. Hitler, jokingly perhaps, often said that his paintings could easily be recognized by their “unreal people;” however, the incredible attention to detail in his landscapes, city scenes, and architectural renderings absolutely abound in realism while unfortunately less apparent in his handling of the human figure. It is obvious in his works that he reached for majesty in some of his art, but he also pictured simple Germanic country scenes, as well. For him, the great structures such as the Pergamon Altar and the Parthenon, both of ancient Greece, and the ancient Roman Pantheon, symbolized for him the dimension and glory of the race he considered the founders and builders of Western civilization—the Aryans. The monumental cathedral constructions of the medieval period, the palaces of the Renaissance and the neoclassical structures of the 19th century were as he often said, “expressions of a cultural community, a heritage to be preserved and perpetuated.” Why did Hitler the purported atheist paint churches and cathedrals? Why indeed? Well first of all, the dubious atheist contention comes from the writings and verbal utterings of the “court historians” who seek always to slander him to the fullest with pompous insolence bordering on superciliousness. They seem duty bound with their chosen agenda to attack every vestige of the man’s very being. Hitler was certainly no atheist. He was raised a Catholic and never at any time renounced his faith. In his book Mein Kampf he proclaimed his Christianity and in numerous verbal pronouncements he spoke of his belief in an “Almighty Creator.” Yes, to some extent, he harbored the anticlerical belief that the church in Rome wielded too much power over its faithful adherents; he disdained “churchology” believing God lives within the soul of man and determines his destiny. He was always in favor of “positive Christianity.” He said in a 1922 speech, “My feelings as a Christian point me to my Lord and Savior as a ‘Kämpfer [“fighter”].” In a 1928 speech he said, “We tolerate no one within our ranks who attacks the idea of Christianity . . . in fact our movement is Christian!” So perhaps this is why he so often portrayed the glory and majesty of churches, abbies, and cathedrals in his paintings both in Germany and Austria. The Karl’s Church in Vienna was, as we said, one of his favorite-subject paintings not only because of its beautiful architectural value, but probably because his youth was spent in the study and admiration of famed saints of the church—as any good altar boy would be proud to do. His appreciation of Saint Charles Borromeo, the Patron of the Baroque, was one of the greatest reformers of the 16th century. In 1713, one year after the last great plague epidemic, Charles VI, Holy Roman Emperor, pledged to build a church for his namesake patron Saint Charles Borromeo, whom was revered as a healer for plague sufferers. Mr. Billy Price’s book Adolf Hitler: The Unknown Artist depicts numerous churches that were painted by Adolf Hitler. It seems it was his most preferred subject matter and obviously, this says something at least about his very nature and his spirituality. He actually portrayed Karl’s Church in many different views—front, back, sides—over a period of time and he found during his Vienna period of painting that the depictions of this building sold by far the best to the public whom he at that time desperately sought to sell to. But as to the several churches that he artfully depicted, we know this one by far is the absolute finest! Its brilliance and clarity stand out like a beacon shedding the true artistic light that now goes far to illuminate the intense interest that the future Führer had in all things religious when he was young. It now looms obvious and can be plainly seen in this magnificent watercolor that this must be called a “very significant work” and we know it was painted by this amazing artist whom the autochthonous plebian writers call a “house painter” in their ever-dubious inflammatory writings. So, here is what I would dare to call a “masterpiece” with ironclad provenance and expertise by one of the only two authorities recognized in the art circles for Hitler paintings. This is a golden opportunity to make a very wise purchase that can only increase in value in a very short time. Already, a watercolor painted by Hitler was reported to bring almost $15,000 in an auction on or about April 23, 2009. But, this painting was in my estimation very dismal and dark and reportedly had no letters or documents of authentication or any provenance. Actually, I didn’t even think it was Hitler’s style at all! This story is repeated over and over every year that goes by. The mere mention of anything that Adolf Hitler owned or produced seems to appeal to those who for any reason are so fascinated with him as to loosen their pockets in a heartbeat if the chance to buy something no matter how loose the connection is or how much actual authentication is provided (Barnum was obviously right!). This dubious canvas that brought nearly the $15,000 was sold in England by Mullock's Specialist Auctioneers & Valuers in Shropshire. So I repeat again that only the expertise of Dr. Priesack and/or Peter Jahn is accepted today, Otherwise you “pays your penny and takes your chance.” In closing let it be said that if you ever wanted to own the ultimate Hitler item actually produced by this phenomenal man here is the unique opportunity that will be before you in all probability only once!

PRICE: P.O.R.

Hitler Painting



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