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Civil War Surrender Announcement by General Joseph Johnston, C.S.A.

 

 

 

Civil War Surrender
Initial greeting by General Joseph Johnston, C.S.A., and Major-General William Sherman, U.S.A.,
at Bennett Place in Durham, North Carolina

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender
General Joseph E. Johnston, C.S.A.

Civil War Surrender
Document in frame

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender
Johnston in postwar years

Civil War Surrender
The grave of General Johnston

Civil War Surrender
William Tecumseh Sherman: a man without a soul

Civil War Surrender
Sherman and his plunderbund

Civil War Surrender
It was the Bennett house that the surrender terms were discussed in April 1865.

Civil War Surrender
It was at this desk that the surrender terms were signed.

Civil War Surrender
Postage stamp honoring Joseph E. Johnston

Civil War Surrender
The grotesque war criminal, William T. Sherman

Civil War Surrender

Civil War Surrender
A period drawing of the surrender

 FANTASTIC!!!!
Here it was, the end of the War of Yankee Aggression and the Second War of Independence: (Civil??? War)
(Item USARTICLES 3-15; SPECIAL ITEMS)

DESCRIPTION:  This is a transcribed, hand-written, general order announcing the prior dayís surrender of General Joseph E. Johnstonís noble Army of Tennessee to the U.S. Army war criminal Major General William T. Sherman. In the general order signed near Greensboro, North Carolina, on April 27, 1865, one of the finest field commanders of the entire war, announced to his beloved and loyal troops his surrender to Sherman based on terms agreed upon the day before. The order reads as follows:

Headquarters Army of Tennessee near Greensboro, N.C., April 27, 1865
General Orders No. 18.
By the terms of a military convention made on the 26th inst by Maj. General W. T. Sherman U.S.A., and Joseph E. Johnston C.S.A. the officers and men of this army are to bind themselves not to take up arms against the United States until properly relieved from that obligation, and shall receive guarantees from the United States [officers against Molestation by the United States.*] authorities so long as they observe that obligation and the laws in force within reason where they reside. For these objects duplicate muster rolls will be made immediately and after distribution of the necessary papers the troops will march under their officers to their respective states and there be disbanded all retaining personal property.
The object of this convention is pacification to the extent of the authority of the commanders who made it. Events in Virginia, which broke every hope of success by war, imposed on its general the duty of sparing the blood of this gallant army and saving our country from further devastation, and our people from ruin. (Signed) J.E. Johnston General OFFICIAL A Anderson A. A. Genl.

The document measures 7 x 9 inches; frame, 13 1/2 x 11 1/2 inches. Those two lines of writing that are difficult to read are the result of a tear that was repaired many years ago by someone who evidently thought that the clear tape would never yellow (the sins of the fathers). Johnston held the rank of brigadier general as an officer in the U.S. Army and accepted this same rank as an officer of the Confederate States Army, and held it during the Battle of First Manassas in July 1861. The next month, Johnston was promoted to the rank of general. In fact, rank wise, he was senior to Sherman, who was a major general.) This amazing man was always in the thick of the fighting and never experienced a direct defeat. He was a brilliant strategist of the first order, while on the other hand Sherman was not a competent field soldier. He retreated before outnumbered Confederate troops. He failed at Vicksburg and Kennesaw Mountain (beaten up there by Johnston). He failed at Chattanooga as Patrick Cleburne blocked Shermanís advance. Was he effective? Yes, as an ISIS-style criminal terrorist. He was good at turning his vicious vandals loose on the southern properties, their women, and firing our beautiful Dixie. However, his brutal campaign of burning and plunder lost the peace more than it won the war leading to decades, even centuries of southern bitterness toward Northerners and was the only way Sherman could win a battle. Johnston goes down in truly bespoken history as one of the true patriots and heroes of our real America, while William T. Sherman seen in his true light was a scallywag and without a doubt, a war criminal personified! Take a look at his demon face; the hunchback Quasimodo was better looking and a better man. The document is very nicely framed in museum mounting with special protective glass. The document is free mounted within and not glued. Donít miss this one; itís very special!

PRICE: SOLD

 

 

 

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