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Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Bronze and Other-Metal Sculptures

Page 3

 

 

 

 

Bronze Landskenchte

Bronze Landskenchte

 

Bronze Landskenchte

Bronze Landskenchte

Bronze Landskenchte

Bronze Landskenchte

Bronze Landskenchte

 

Bronze Landskenchte

Bronze Landskenchte

Bronze Landskenchte

Bronze Landskenchte

Bronze Landskenchte

 

Bronze Landskenchte

Bronze Landskenchte

Bronze Landskenchte

Bronze Landskenchte

 

Pair of Exquisite Bronze Statues of Landsknechte (Item BRONZEMET 3-1; LAND 2-3)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a beautiful statuary group depicting two rough-and-ready mercenary soldiers known as Landsknechte. For a further explanation of the term see the heading at our Landsknechte page at the top. These bold fighters usually wore colorful attire with flashing colors in the finest of fabric, but as they were the ultimate fighting men of their day the battle clothing changed from time to time as required by conditions, and also changed, depending on which king or noble lord they served and his requirements they conformed to. The two Landsknechte depicted here are in full armor—at least in the upper body. The helmets were of the style used by Soldaten who were in the employ of royalty or at least very wealthy landed gentry. Helmets such as this were extremely expensive in that era and both look to be the type crafted by metal masters in Italy. One man carries one of the most formidable weapons used by the mercenaries; a huge mace with its business end studded with sharp nail points. The other has a sword and he sounds a call to battle on his horn. The Landsknechte were proud fighting men and a very colorful lot having left behind a rich although bloody tradition. They had a series of battle ballads some of which are cataloged in German and Swiss archival records today. Some of their songs were sung by the storm troopers of the Third Reich; both Brown Shirts and army and Waffen- troops as they marched off to war. The sculptures are of pure bronze with a golden hue; they measure 16 ½ inches high and are quite heavy. The sculptures are not signed but are of the finest of quality. They must have been accomplished by a master sculptor who might have been so famous in his time that he felt his work was his signature alone. Imagine these stalwart battle-hardened fellows on your shelf or desk. They will surely be a statement of determination and will.

PRICE: $2,500.00 for the set

 

 

 

 

Vercingetorix

Vercingetorix

 

Vercingetorix

Vercingetorix

Vercingetorix

Vercingetorix

Vercingetorix

Vercingetorix

Vercingetorix

Vercingetorix

 

Vercingetorix

Vercingetorix
Gaul versus Roman

Vercingetorix

 

The Gaulish Chief Vercingetorix with the Sign of Unity, by Edouard Drouot (Item BRONZEMET 3-2)

DESCRIPTION: Here is the famed Vercingetorix, the chief of the Arverni tribe who united the Gauls in an unsuccessful revolt against Caesar in 52 B.C. Caesar had almost completed the subjugation of Gaul when Vercingetorix led a general uprising against him. After an initial defeat in early battle, Vercingetorix used guerilla warfare to harass Caesar’s supply lines and cleverly offered to engage the Roman forces on terrain unfavorable to them. He successfully held the Arvernian hill-fort of Gergovia against an assault by Caesar. Vercingetorix followed this victory by an attack on the Roman army, the failure of which compelled him to retreat with 80,000 troops to the prepared fortress of Alesia (in east-central France). Caesar, with 60,000 men, laid siege to the fortress and was able to force its surrender after he had defeated the Gaul’s reserve army in the field. Brave Vercingetorix was taken to Rome in chains, exhibited in Caesar’s triumph and executed six years later. When Caesar wrote The Gallic Wars, he said of Vercingetorix, “Himself a man of boundless energy, he terrorized [his own and the enemy] with the rigors of an iron discipline.” The statue stands 30 inches high from the bottom of the base to the top of his helmet, but to the top of the laurel branch it is 30 inches. The meaning of the uplifted branch of laurel is this: In order that the Germanic tribes of the Arveni and the other Gauls would be able to resist the Roman Legions they would have to be able to come together in unity, much as Hermann the Liberator brought the tribes together for the great Germanic victory in the Teutoberg Forest against the Romans. Now it was entirely incumbent on Vercingetorix to do the same. Up to this point the various tribes of the Gauls and other clans were constantly in petty squabbles against one another, but now it was a case of either to prevail militarily or lose and go right into Roman bondage. So, Vercingetorix would be the man of the hour! He went to the tribal councils each time with the upraised laurel as a sign of unity, and he sat with the elders and convinced them of his position and whatever emergency that had arisen thereby successfully gaining their full support. The statue is beautifully detailed with a wonderful bronze patina. It’s signed by the master sculptor Edouard Drouot, 1859-1945, and bears the stamp of the Paris Foundry. Drouot had a penchant for depicting hunting scenes, exotic eastern subjects, mythological figures, nymphs, and important historical scenes and personages such as the one we offer here. He produced a myriad of fine collectible sculptures that were cast to absolute perfection and he commanded and demanded top quality of his founders. It’s estimated that his bronze editions number no less than five hundred. His men are rugged and strong featured. Women are well proportioned and beautiful. The style Drouot set never really changed over his sixty-five year career. Harold Berman’s four volume set of books Sculptors and Founders (1800-1930) show numerous Drouot sculptures. This one, however, must be considered quite rare as it is not included in the cataloged works. We feel it was a very special edition. It is said of this sculptor that he loved the fluidity of the Art Nouveau movements in his portrayals, and, he had a recurrent ability to arrest movement and expression with a definite touch of genius. This figure possesses all those features to the height of perfection. The figure shows the accurate dress of the Gaulish warrior chief: his typical winged helmet, the braided hair style, the wide girdle, the great war ax and shield. Here is a dramatic historical subject beautifully depicted and very rare and exciting.

PRICE: $6,950.00

 

 

 

Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue

Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
The lance
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
The signature
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Note: 5th Uhlan boards
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Equestrian Statue
Massive Equestrian Bronze Statue of the 5th Regiment Prussian Uhlans(Item BRONZEMET 3-3; WWI 12-15; KSTATUE 5-16)

DESCRIPTION: This is a magnificent bronze depiction of a mounted horseman of the Fifth Uhlan Regiment of the Kaisers 3rd Cavalry Division attached to the First German Army Command. They served with particular distinction in the Franco Prussian war and WW1.  Uhlans were light cavalry, actually Lancers, who fought with carbines, swords, and lances.  The title Uhlan was used by Lancer regiments in the Russian, Austrian and especially the Prussian armies.  Uhlans typically wore a double buttoned tunic (Kurta) with a colored panel at the front, a colored sash and a square topped Lancer cap (Czapka), also spelled chapka.  This cap was originally derived from a traditional design of the Polish civilian cap made more formal and stylized for military use.  Their Lances usually had small swallow tail pennants known as the Lance Pennon that was found just below the spearhead (see our pictures).  Prussian Uhlans distinguished themselves and fought bravely in the war against Napoleon.  In WW1 the Imperial German Army included 26 Uhlan regiments.  They all saw action while on duty at the first part of the war and their charge with lances struck fear in the hearts of the enemy since it has well been known that these were formidable warriors adept at warfare (up front and personal!).  Later in the second year of the war the Uhlan regiments were either dismounted to serve as cavalry rifle regiments in the trenches of the western front or transferred to the eastern front where primitive conditions made it still possible for horse cavalry to play an effective role.  In WWII a popular myth is that Polish cavalry armed with lances charged and were annihilated by German tanks during the 1939 campaign; this arose from the misreporting (both intentional and unintentional) of the charge at Krojanty on 1 September when two squadrons of Polish 18th Lancers armed with lances and sabers were met in combat by German cavalry led by Harry Von Johnston in what was the last charge of German cavalry with sabre.  The Poles were dispersed and defeated by Germans who rode one last time in the spirit of the Old Prussian Uhlans.  This is a little known fact of history that for the most part has remained hidden for all these years.

The bronze statue is accurate in every detail and prodigiously dramatic in its heroic depiction. It is a huge and heavy sculpture done in the finest mode of German bronze art. It measures 26 inches high from the bottom of the base to the top of the Uhlan Czapka.  The horse is 22 inches long from tail to muzzle.  The base is measured at 19 ½ x 7 inches.  The sculpture is signed by Leon Mignon (1847-1898), a sculptor from Brussels, Belgium. He studied under the sculptor Prosper Drion (1822–1906) at the Académie in Liège from 1857 to 1871. He was a particular admirer of the anecdotal sculpture of Léopold Harzé (1831–1893). His vocation as a sculptor of animal subjects began in Rome, where he studied on a grant from 1872 to 1876. He exhibited in Ghent (1874) and on several occasions in Paris (where he lived from 1876 to 1882) at the Salon des Artistes Français. He achieved prominence at the exposition Universelle of 1878 in Paris with his bulls fighting in the Roman countryside (Brussels, mus. a. mod.). In 1880–81, he shared a studio with the Belgian sculptor Paul DeVigne, whom he had met in Rome. Mignon’s bull tamer (liège, parc avroy) took the gold medal at the Salon of 1880. In 1882 he settled in Brussels and in 1888 produced the labors of Hercules reliefs for the stairway of the palace of Charles de Lorraine (now part of the Bibliothèque Royale Albertier). He sculpted several historical figures for the provincial law courts and was an astute philosopher of his time. In 1892 he sculpted many subjects for the Université de Liège. He excelled as a sculptor of animal subjects. Mignon occupies a leading place in Belgian realist art. He also modeled busts of Belgian personalities as well as a statuette of the Belgian painter Hubert Bellis; figurines of workers, soldiers from the Belgian regiments (c. 1889), and even an equestrian statue of a Prussian Uhlan, France’s enemy in the 1870 war; and a statue of Leopold in 1886 ( Brussels, mus. a. mod.). His works are preserved in the Musée de l’art Wallon, Liège, and the Musée d’Art Moderne, Brussels. He was completing a frieze for the Hôtel Somzée in Brussels when he died unexpectedly. He was an amazing artist and a cultured man of vision. A grand museum grade art piece personified and extraordinaire!  It is priced under market value for a sculpture as fine as this one is.  It is certain that one could not find any such dramatic artistic accomplishment to rival this one. Here he is! In all his Imperial glory.  Listen as you view him and perhaps, just perhaps, you will hear the strains of “Heil Dir im Seigerkranz” (Hail to thee in Victors Crown.) Deutschlands Helden Lebt in ewig leben!

PRICE: $12,500.00

 

 

 

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists
Note the playing cards

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists
Artist's signature

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists

Bronze Dualists
Other groupings by this artist

Bronze Dualists
From Berman's book

Bronze Dualists
More groupings from this artist

Bronze Dualists

“The Duelists” by Guillemin (Item BRONZEMET 3-4)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a pair of sculptures by one of the greatest sculptors of France, Émile Guillemin (1841-1907). Paris-born Guillemin was best known for these lively, small-scale cavaliers and conquistadors—often in conflict. His lifelike biblical heroes: Judith, Rebecca, David and Goliath are nothing short of extraordinary as are his ravishing Turkish dancing girls. Accurate costuming, minute detailing, expressive faces, and top French foundry work typify his sculptures; interestingly some of his finest pieces were not signed. The group we offer here are among the “best of the best!” I have said his specialty was the action figures of cavaliers and here is one of the twosome sets that were his outstanding masterpieces. We show pictures of others from the hornbook on bronzes that is mentioned further on in this descriptive narrative. This set depicts two cavaliers who have had a violent disagreement that has led to an impromptu duel that would surely lead to death were it not for the intervention of both of their friends. Their short tempers are ignited over a card game where it is assumed that that one chap has accused the other of cheating. The evidence of the ensuing “donnybrook” is clear if you look at the floor where the debris of an overturned gaming table is evident and there at their feet is a beer or wine pitcher, playing cards, a broken flagon, etc., points out evidence of the sudden fiery confrontation. The cavalier on the left has his sword already drawn and attempts to lunge with it toward the other cavalier, who is in the act of drawing his weapon. Meanwhile the shocked friends, who are also cavaliers, are doing their level best to stop the mayhem that is beginning and surely will end with the death of one of the would-be combatants. The action is profound and realistic to the greatest degree and the scene is fantastically exciting; the facial expressions capture all the real emotion that would have been experienced in a scenario of impending doom such as this. The sculpture is one of two of this subject. We picture the other figures by Guillemin that can be seen in the books by Harold Berman on page 396, figures 1470 and 1471, in the set of books entitled Bronzes: Sculptors & Founders, 1800-1930, Volume Two. These dueling cavaliers are utterly great, and by the greatest sculptor of action bronzes; we have included about 20 views of the wonderful detail. We have never seen bronze sculptures that depict a historical incident so artistically perfect. The figures are in A-1 perfect condition with some discoloration in the old silver plating, but this not only does not detract, but actually gives an elegant and quality highlight to the scene. This is a superb and prodigiously important sculptor. The figures are about 9 inches high and their bases are about 5 inches across. Magnifique!!!

PRICE: $3,850.00

 

 

 

 

Bronze Skeleton Warrior

Bronze Skeleton Warrior

Bronze Skeleton Warrior

Bronze Skeleton Warrior

Bronze Skeleton Warrior

Bronze Skeleton Warrior

Bronze Skeleton Warrior

Bronze Skeleton Warrior

Bronze Skeleton Warrior

Skeleton Warrior (Item BRONZEMET 3-5)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a strange and eerie figure in bronze of a skeleton, who holds a lance and shield right from the under reaches of hades. If you ever saw the epic film Jason and the Argonauts you must remember the classic scene where Jason has to battle the children of the Hydra, who sprung from the ground as skeleton warriors germinated from her teeth planted by his pursuer. This figure that stands about a foot high—not counting his spear—looks just like those ghostly fighters of the Underworld. The marble base measures 9 ½ x 5 inches. The anatomical structure of the figure is very realistic and the pose prodigiously dramatic. The shield has the image of the demonic tribal coven that he comes from, evidently. This would be a great desk ornament for a lawyer, bill collector, IRS agent, or maybe a chiropractor!

PRICE: $685.00

 

 

 

Bronze Warrior

Bronze Warrior

Bronze Warrior

Bronze Warrior

Bronze Warrior
Taken with flash

Bronze Warrior

Bronze Warrior

Bronze Warrior

Bronze Warrior

Bronze Warrior
The front of the shield

Bronze Warrior
Artist's signature

Bronze Warrior

Bronze Warrior

Bronze Warrior

Bronze Warrior

Bronze Warrior

Bronze Warrior

Bronze Warrior

Bronze Warrior
The jousting hook device

Bronze Warrior
Other bronzes by this artist

Bronze Warrior

Bronze of a Chivalrous Knight with his “Special Prize” (Item BRONZEMET 3-6)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a great bronze statue depicting the knight who was the winner of a jousting contest with “first prize” and “what a prize”! The intriguing group is by famed French sculptor François-André Clemencin (1878-1950). On the base of the statue it says Celui Qui Fut Pris (“Whoever was caught”). It is in full genuine bronze and has a fine bronze patina. Height 15 inches, or 38 cm. The sculptor probably did the work about 1908. If you look closely at the pictures you can see the devise on the knight’s armor for securing the jousting lance. The work is signed “Clemencin,” who uses only his last name. Although the sculpture is rather whimsical the sword and armor is quite accurate. Clemencin was an artist of note and is mentioned in several hornbooks on sculptured art including a biography in Pierre Kjellberg’s Bronzes of the 19TH Century. The piece is in great condition overall, but missing one spur off his armored foot. To the victor goes the prize!

PRICE: $4,300.00

 

 

 

French Bronze
La Défense du Foyer - “Defense of the Home”

French Bronze
Here is the statue by E. Boisseau that stands
in the Square d’Ajaccio in Paris

French Bronze

French Bronze

French Bronze

French Bronze

French Bronze

French Bronze

French Bronze

French Bronze

French Bronze

French Bronze

French Bronze

French Bronze

French Bronze

French Bronze

French Bronze

French Bronze
The Roman standard

French Bronze
The artist's signature

French Bronze

French Bronze
The Paris foundry seal

French Bronze
The plaque by Boisseau

French Bronze
Another sculpture by Boisseau

French Bronze
Another sculpture by Boisseau,
but in granite or porcelain

Monumental Statue in Bronze “Defense of the Home” (La Défense du Foyer) (Item BRONZEMET 3-7)

DESCRIPTION: Here is the most impressive and meaningful bronze sculpture that we have ever offered. The subject was sculpted by French artist Emile-André Boisseau (1842-1923). The subject was immortalized in this sculpture and a bronze plaque, plus a fully twice life-sized statue in stone that stands in Paris in Ajaccio Park known as Defense Square. The subject is a brave Germanic warrior who stands defiant in battle to protect his home and family from the enemy. We believe he is a Teutonic warrior because at his feet lies the broken eagle standard of Rome. The French sculptors were absolutely fascinated by the historic saga of Die Schlacht im Teutoburger Wald (The Battle of the Teutoburg Forest) where Hermann, the Cherusci chieftain, also known as Arminus, soundly defeated three Roman legions along with their auxiliaries led by Publius Quinctilius Varus. To learn more about this epic battle, go to Google (Wikipedia). Also see our featured china plate on the Old Reich section of our pages at OLD 3-2. Also see OLD 7-2. The foundry mark on the sculpture is from the Paris Society of Bronzes. The statue is seen as image 1124 in Bronzes : Sculptors and Founders, 1800-1930 Vol. II by Harold Berman. The base bears the artist’s name and the inscription “Salon des Beaux-Arts” (Gallery of Fine Art). This was the term under which two groups of French artists united; the first, for exhibitions in the early 1860s; the second, since 1890 for annual exhibitions of the best in paintings and sculpture. This particular piece would certainly be ranked as one of the best of the age. The statue stands about 35 inches high with a base 15 inches in diameter. It is very heavy. The subject is both heroic with the defiant warrior, but also sentimental with his wife and baby so frightened, but confident in the fierce determination of their man to protect them from the cruel enemy. This has been the way of the warrior from time immemorial. Boisseau has never portrayed the theme as art in a fashion so loving as in this sculpture he created in 1915. The sculpture has been said to represent in visual terms Marshal Joseph Joffre’s* rallying call in 1914 to the soldiers of France to die where thy stood rather than to give way. It represents a vulnerable civilian population protected from the enemy by the sheer valor of its fighting men. Bousseau’s sculpture dates from 1915, when French propaganda still promulgated the possibility of an early glorious victory before the reality of the disastrous war struck home to a wider public. All of that being said, it is still evident that Boisseau had in the recess of his mind the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest if evidenced only by the broken Roman standard cast upon the ground. Was this French wartime propaganda or a statement about the defense of the Aryan culture group and its peoples? Maybe a bit of both? In any case, it stands as a symbol of the strength and resolve of men of the West who, in the fray, will stand for family, nation, and principles. Let this wonderful work of art be a permanent reminder of that noble calling: Forever and ever the cause we’ll uphold; the cause of the true; and the trusted and bold.

*Marshal Joseph Jacques Césaire Joffre was a French general during WW I. He is best known for regrouping the retreating Allied armies to defeat the Germans at the strategically decisive First Battle for the Marne in 1914. His popularity led to his nickname “Papa Joffre.”

PRICE: $16,000.00

 

 

Teutonic Statue

Teutonic Statue

Teutonic Statue

Teutonic Statue

Teutonic Statue

Teutonic Statue

Teutonic Statue
Teutonic knights in battle

Teutonic Statue
Symbol of the Order

Teutonic Statue
Castle Marienburg, seat of the Teutonic Order
and home of the knights

Metal Sculpture of a Teutonic Knight in Chainmail (Item BRONZEMET 3-8)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a rather dramatic-looking Teutonic knight with all his weaponry and shield. He is wearing a full-body outfit of mesh mail. He cradles his three-handed sword as it is basically his best friend in his calling of knighthood. But he also wears the great ax used in close combat. These Germanic knights were a very formidable fighting force. There was an Order of Brothers of the German House of Saint Mary in Jerusalem. They were formed in 1190, and they served as a crusading military order in the Middle Ages. They fought in many a bloody campaign; mostly with the mission to Christianize the East. They fought the Poles, Russians, and defended the borders of Hungary against the Kipchacks, who were Crimean Tartars (Mongol-type hordes) while under the command of Hermann von Salza, the Grand Master of the Knights. Their power was great in those times. Our knight strikes a heroic pose—ready for battle. He stands 13 inches high and the material he is made of is either cast iron or white metal, but unlike most white-metal sculptures, he is quite heavy. The condition is extra fine with no breaks and nothing missing. His shield bears the oak leaves from the sacred oak, the symbol of Germany’s military prowess.

PRICE: $780.00

 

 

Bronze WW I Soldier

Teutonic Statue

Teutonic Statue

Teutonic Statue

Teutonic Statue

Petite German WWI Soldier in Bronze with Pickelhaube and Rifle (Item BRONZEMET 3-9)

DESCRIPTION: This is a really niece little bronze sculpture that is a little re-creation of a statue that stood on the banks of the northern Rhine River near Duisburg. There was in the 1800s a poem that was in American school journals, but then that was before the media propagandists turned the American population into haters against their own European kith and kin. The poem went:
“Steadfast and true these sons of thine as they stand watch upon our noble Rhine!”
The rest of it slips my mind. Fest steht und treu die Wacht, die Wacht am Rhein! The statue had the same name as the famed German patriotic song Die Wacht am Rhein (Watch on the Rhine). The sculpture with the rock he stands upon is about 7 or 7 ½ inches tall. He is depicted in the winter season as evidenced by his overcoat. He wears the Pickelhaube or spike helmet with the all-season helmet cover. This is an original period sculpture and a very dramatic and romantic sculpture from the days of Germany’s glory.

PRICE: $285.00

 

 

Art Nouveau Sculpture

Art Nouveau Sculpture

Art Nouveau Sculpture

Art Nouveau Sculpture

Art Nouveau Sculpture

Art Nouveau Sculpture

Art Nouveau Sculpture

Art Nouveau Sculpture

Beautiful Art Nouveau Sculpture (Item BRONZEMET 3-10)

DESCRIPTION: Here is an item that normally would not be included in our gallery because it has no military or warfare connection. However, I could not resist its beauty and wonderfully flowing lines. It is truly a great art nouveau sculpture in the classic sense. The female figure stands in all her glorious beauty while wearing a gown of regal distinction. She also has as part of her physiognomy a pair of long, graceful wings making her a mythological figure of saga. Her hair style is typical of the 1880s. She stands about nine inches tall and that would be the measurement from the tip of the wings as they extend below the plinth. The plinth is about two inches tall comprised of two separate but joined pieces of beautiful black Italian marble. This is a very gorgeous sculpture of the 19th century.

PRICE: $450.00

 

 

Wehrmacht

Wehrmacht

 

Wehrmacht

Wehrmacht

Wehrmacht

Wehrmacht

Wehrmacht

Wehrmacht

Wehrmacht

Wehrmacht

Wehrmacht
Note the similarity between these Argentine uniforms and the German's

Wehrmacht
Germanic right down to the goose step

Wehrmacht
Yes, these are Argentine soldiers, not Wehrmacht

Charging German-Type Soldier in Bronze (Item BRONZEMET 3-11; WEHR 33-5)

DESCRIPTION: Why do I say “type”? Because he is not a German WWII soldier at all; he is an Argentine soldier. Under the Perón regime the Argentine army patterned its entire armed forces after the German Wehrmacht. The helmet on this sculpture is much like the German style. The tunic, field pack, ammo pouches, collar tabs, and shoulder boards are all similar to the German counterparts. The shoes are similar to the ones worn by the German Africa Corps. He has a Mauser model 98 rifle, but only the bayonet is different. It looks like a Japanese bayonet, actually. However, at an earlier point in German military history they did have a bayonet like this. The entrenching shovel, canteen, and bread bag are virtually identical to German WWII issue. Overall, it is a fact that the average person who knows a little about WWII would take this figure to be a soldier of the Deutsches Vaterland. The figure stands 16 inches. The base is measures 7 ½ x 4 inches. The length of the rifle and bayonet measure 13 inches long. This is a very dramatic sculpture, and will look great on your desk or your display case. We offer this wonderful bronze for a most reasonable price.

PRICE: $1,200.00

 

 

Miniature bronze cannon

Miniature bronze cannon

 

Miniature bronze cannon

Miniature bronze cannon

Miniature bronze cannon

Miniature bronze cannon

Miniature bronze cannon

Miniature bronze cannon

Miniature bronze cannon

(Handmade) Miniature Cannon in Bronze (Item BRONZEMET 3-12)

DESCRIPTION: Here is the cutest little cannon you will ever see. It looks like the field piece known as the Tsar Cannon which, in its day, was the largest Howitzer ever made at the end of the Middle Ages. Don’t sell this little guy short. He is really a masterpiece of bronze art lovingly fashioned by the hands and skills of a real artist. We show several angles of the artillery piece and you can definitely see the artistry that went into this small, but dynamic, perception. It is very solid with not one loose piece or connection. The wheels are absolutely phenomenal, having spikes to hold the gun firmly to the ground when firing. It measures 4 inches in diameter at the base. The barrel length is 2 1/2 inches as is the carriage. Imagine this as your desk paperweight. You will surely hear many welcome comments on your taste in refined aesthetics. This is a charmer and certainly unique. It has only the initials of the artist under the base. It was made many years ago and the artist may be long gone, but he left behind an absolutely great little memento of his art.

PRICE: $350.00; for a unique, original piece of history personified

 

 

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue
Otto Albert Koch's painting of Schlacht im Teutoburger Wald 1909

 

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue
The eagle from the
fallen Roman standard

Bronze Statue
The Roman standard and emperor

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue
Broken Roman lance

Bronze Statue
H. Gauquié's signature

Bronze Statue
Many historians believe this
is the bust of Arminius

Bronze Statue
Autumn in the Teutoburger Wald

Bronze Statue
Ernst Bandel’s magnificent statue of
the liberator in the forest

Bronze Statue
The victorious advance of Hermann

Bronze Statue
The glory of the Teutons

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Sculpture of a Teutonic Warrior by Henri Désiré Gauquié (Item BRONZEMET 3-13; OLD 7-2a; ART 16-1a)

DESCRIPTION: Here is what I would have to say is the sculpture that is my favorite of all the magnificent bronzes that we have ever acquired or owned in our personal collection. The subject is known as “Vae Victus” by famed sculptor Henri Désiré Gauquié (1858-1927). Born in the ancient French village of Flers-lez Lille, Henri Gauquié is well known for producing a number of small bronze statues and a large number of life-size monuments of people and animals in France. One of his famous horse sculptures is the equestrian statue of Marshal de Villens in Denain, a town between Lille and Valenciennes. It commemorates the Marshal’s victory at the Battle of Denain on 24 July 1712. A well-known monument to the French Baroque painter Jean-Antoine Watteau was created by him in 1896 in the Jardin du Luxembourg in Paris as collaboration in marble and bronze with the architect Henri Gillaume. Henri Gauquié died in Paris in 1929. He was certainly one of the finest and greatest sculptors that France ever produced and it was certainly the nation of sculptors.

The Sculpture

The depiction here by Gauquié is of a warrior of the Teutonic tribe known as the Cherusci, which, under the brilliant leadership of the chieftain Arminius, or Hermann, ambushed and decisively annihilated three Roman legions and auxiliaries which were led by Publius Quinctilius Varus. Varus was a noble from a patrician family which was related to the Imperial family. Varus’ name and deeds were well known beyond the Roman Empire because of his ruthlessness and crucifixion of insurgents. While he was feared by the people he was highly respected by the Roman Senate. On the Rhine he was in command of the XVII, XVIII, and XIX Legions. The great and bloody battle ensued after Varus attempted to enter and raid the Germania territory east of the Rhine River. After the tremendous loss during the Schlacht im Teutoburger Wald, the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest, the Roman Legions never again attempted to conquer the people in the east of the Rhine. Arminius was the son of the Cheruscan chief Segimerus and trained as a Roman military commander. He had lived in Rome as a hostage in his youth where he received a military education and obtained Roman citizenship and the status of equestrian knight before returning to Germania and defeating the Romans and after seeing to the unity of the Germanic tribes and to thwart Roman efforts to incorporate the German lands into the Empire. Then, in the year 9 AD, the Romans fell into a trap and ambush set by this ex-soldier of Rome who was still loyal to his original people. Twenty thousand of Rome’s finest soldiers were totally annihilated. Their commander, Varus, committed suicide by falling on his sword. Arminius’ success in destroying three crack legions and driving the Romans out of Germany was the single most devastating defeat that Rome had ever suffered in its history and was a high point of Germanic power for centuries. Roman attempts to reconquer Germany failed in every instance. The sculpture is magnificent. I have always been an ardent admirer of the sculptor Arno Brecker and Josef Thorak who were the official sculptors of the Third Reich. Thorak always created grandiose monuments and statues intended to represent the folk life of Germany that was under the NSDAP government. These works tended to be heroic in scale up to 65 feet in height. His official works from this period included a number of sculptures erected at the Berlin Olympic Stadium of 1936. His preference was for heroic statuary of Aryan man in the neoclassical nude and seminude depictions that practically portrayed these Aryan heroes as gods upon the earth. Certainly, this was the elite of the races of man. Perhaps it is because of my love of the art of Thorak and Brecker that I am transfixed and awed by this sculpture by Gauquié because I have never seen any bronze work of art that is so reminiscent of the work of those two German masters. The style is exactly the same right to the Aryan features and general physiognomy. The Teutonic warrior triumphantly holds high the captured Roman sword (gladius) as he treads into the forest floor. At his feet is the broken Roman-eagle standard with the letters “SPQR” the meaning of which in Latin is “The Senate and People of Rome” “Senatus Populus que Romanus.” Also thrust to the ground under the Teutonic feet is a plaque with the effigy of Emperor Augustus, who was so shaken by the news of the battle’s result that he stood butting his head against the walls of his palace repeating “Quintili Vare, legiones redde!,” “Quintilius Varus, give me back my legions!” This is a very large bronze. It measures 40 inches from the bottom of the base to the hand holding the sword. The measurement from the bottom of the base to the top of the warriors head is 36 inches. This statue summons all the utter ferocity of one of the world’s greatest and most prodigiously important battles that essentially stopped the moribund Roman empire from its eastward expansion and I think it shows the mettle of the German fighting men who many centuries later would be recognized in the German WWII Wehrmacht as we now know them. This statue can be a tribute to bravery and the constant struggle for freedom for western man.

PRICE: $15,000

 

 

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

 

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue
The plinth

Bronze Statue
The plaque

Bronze Statue
Coudray's signature

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue
Belt buckle

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue
Belt buckle

Bronze Statue
Foundry mark

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Bronze Statue

Utterly Magnificent Bronze of the Warrior Prince l’Emir by Georges Charles Coudray (Item BRONZEMET 3-14)

DESCRIPTION: Here is the Emir or High Sheikh. In the Arabic language it is “Emir” and means chieftain or commander and often it denoted as prince. The great Saladin was made an emir or prince in Egypt between 1174 and 1193. He defeated the Crusaders in the reconquest of Palestine at the decisive Battle of Hatton in 1187. The Crusaders had conquered it 88 years earlier. Saladin has become a prominent figure in Muslim, Arabic, and Kurdish culture and his reported noble and chivalrous behavior was noted even by Christian chroniclers and despite being the nemesis of the Crusaders, he purportedly won the respect of many of them, including Richard the Lionheart, who led the Third Crusade. This sculpture may well have represented Saladin, himself? The bronze sculpture we offer is by the famed artist Georges Charles Coudray, who was born in Paris in 1883 and died in 1932. He was considered one of the greatest French bronze sculptors during his fabulous artistic career and is still recognized as such today. He was a student of the great Parisian sculptor Jean-Joseph-Alexandre Falguière. Many of Coudray’s statues, busts, and medallions often exhibited a distinctive eastern influence. He exhibited his work at the Salon from 1883 to 1903. Among his most characteristic works was this wonderful statue of the all-high Emir and also the elegant “Aguila,” a statuette in bronze created in 1892, then, in 1899, “Les Nénuphars,” a bust in terra cotta and “Iris,” a statue in marble in 1902. However, the Emir and a statuette in plaster entitled “Tahoser” inspired by the Roman de la momie of Théophile, representing an Egyptian maiden playing the harp, were undoubtedly his greatest. The Egyptian statuette was exhibited at the Paris Salon of 1892.

The Emir Bronze

This magnificent sculpture in fire-bronze finish bears about the finest patina that we have ever observed on any sculpture to date. Its wonderful brilliance brings forth the fantastic detail that Georges Coudray painstakingly applied to his masterpieces. It is a big and heavy bronze standing 33 inches high from the bottom of the plinth to the top of the spike figuration on his helmet or Khula-khud. He holds an Arabic sword known generally as a scimitar or more exactly as the Saiful Ali, the most famous sword in Islamic history. Legend has it that the Muslim warrior Ali Zulfiker slew a Markan foot soldier with this famed sword cleaving both his helmet and head at the Battle of Uhud and at the same battle he slew Amr, a ferocious, and devastating Markan soldier in the heat of battle. The Markan people were of Negroid stock from the Sahara regions. The curved sword—scimitar—was widespread throughout the Muslim world especially in the Ottoman period. In his belt he wears a dagger that is styled like an Ottoman yataghan sword, but this one is a dagger called a Zirah-bouk. Coudray was always very accurate in portraying the weapons and clothing of these warriors of the past. The vest and robe that the Emir wears is perfectly and accurately depicted for a high official and warrior of that era. On the plinth there is a brass plaque that proclaims the title of the bronze: “L’EMIR EXPon- (the initials mean for exhibition)- - DES BEAUX-ARTS.” These three words refer to the greatest artistic style as taught at the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, the world’s most prestigious school for the training of French artists. This Coudray sculpture is considered very typically “Beaux-Arts" style. In other words, in the wonderful neoclassical style that is forever loved and adored by true art connoisseurs. And of course as we mentioned before Coudray exhibited his art at the Salon in Paris. This was the official art exhibition of the Académie des Beaux-Arts and between 1748 to 1890 it was the greatest annual art event in the Western world, where the ever-conservative and academic juries were not at all receptive to the impressionist artists (if you can call them artists). Their works were usually rejected or at least poorly placed if accepted at all, and very few were ever accepted. Realism and natural beauty in art were the order of the day and this sculpture, “L’Emir” certainly was a star attraction and I believe you can easily see why. We are very proud to offer this example of Beaux-Arts in possibly the greatest example you may ever see offered anywhere. This is surely the best!

PRICE: $15,000

 

 

France

France

France

France

France

France

France

France

France

France

France

France

France

France

France

France

Sculpture of Jeanne d’Arc, in French (Item BRONZEMET 3-15; FRAN 2-1)

DESCRIPTION: This is a magnificent sculpture by the master artist by the name of Laucier of the immortal Joan of Arc. Joan was born at Domrémy in the province of Lorraine in 1412, daughter of a peasant farmer; poor, but not needy. She never learned to read or write. She was noted to be a singularly pious child, who often knelt in church absorbed in prayer. Later, the vicious English invaders tried to connect her with superstitious, witchlike practices supposed to have been performed around a certain tree popularly know as the “Fairy Tree.” She had sung and danced there with other children and she wove wreaths from its leaves and branches for the statue of the Virgin, but she was no witch. It was at the age of 13 in the summer of 1416 that this young maiden first became conscious of that manifestation whose supernatural character; it would now be rash to question. Later she was able to identify and discern in some way the voices that spoke to her. She identified St. Michael, St. Catherine, and others. She was always reluctant to speak of her voices. Nonetheless, she told the star-chamber judges, “I saw them with my own eyes just as well as I see you.” The legend has it that the voices revealed her mission and it does seem that the call of God was only made to her gradually, but by May 1428, she no longer doubted that she was to go to help the king. The military situation of King Charles and his supporters was growing more desperate. Orléans was invested October 12, 1428, and by the close of the year complete and devastating defeat seemed imminent. Joan’s voices became urgent and even threatening. She said to them, “I am a poor girl. I do not know how to ride or fight.” The voices reiterated, “It is God who commands it.” Yielding at last, she left Domrémy in January 1429, went to her king, donned male costume, took up the sword, and impressed the generals because of her persistence. A secret sign communicated to her by the voices led the king somewhat half heartedly to believe in her mission. What this mission was Joan never revealed. Her faith, honesty, and simplicity made a favorable impression. Instead of the sword that the king had given her she begged that a search might be made for an ancient sword buried as she averred behind the altar in the chapel of Ste-Catherine-de-Fierbois. It was found in the very spot her voices indicated. There was made for her at the same time a standard bearing the words: “Jesus, mama,” with a picture of God the Father, and kneeling angels presenting a fleur-de-lis. The rest is the story of how with devotion to her cause, bravery, and heavenly guidance Joan was able to lead the French Army to victory after victory literally driving the hated English from French soil and she finally saw Charles VII solemnly crowned July 17, 1429. The principal aim of Joan’s mission was thus attained and it was now her wish to return home, but the army would not hear of it. It had never loved any commander more. Finally captured at the Battle of Compiègne on May 24, she began the long road to martyrdom. No words can describe the disgraceful ingratitude and apathy of Charles and his advisors in leaving the maid to her fate. Joan was literally sold to the English by John of Luxemburg for the sum which would amount to several hundred thousands of dollars in modern money. There can be no doubt that the English, partly because they feared their prisoner with a superstitious terror, and partly because they were ashamed of the dread she inspired, were determined at all costs to take her precious life. They could not put her to death for having beaten them, but they could get her sentenced as a witch and a heretic. She suffered bestial treatment from the English and traitors from her French countrymen such as Pierre Cauchon, the bishop of Beauvais. She was kept in an iron cage chained by the neck, hands, and feet, and allowed no spiritual privileges. We will not recount the infamous star-chamber court proceeding. The whole affair was cruel beyond belief with the English and Burgundians furiously tormenting her. When they finally had their way a court of 37 judges (murderous stooges) decided unanimously that the maid must be treated as a relapsed heretic. On May 30, 1431, amid circumstances of intense pathos she was allowed to receive communion and make her confession. Her demeanor at the stake was such to move even her bitter enemies to tears. She asked for a cross, which after, she embraced it, was held up before her while she called continuously upon the name of Jesus. “Until the last,” said Manchon, the recorder at the trial, “she declared that her voices came from God and had not deceived her.” After death her ashes were thrown into the Seine. Joan was canonized as a saint in 1920 by Pope Benedict XV. This sculpture captures all the noble countenance of this maid of Orléans more than any of such statuary that we have seen over the years. The detail is extraordinary and even this Lutheran has to greatly admire not only the wonderful artwork, but the saga of this the bravest and most noble of the Saints of Catholicism. Yet this is more than a statue of a saint; it is the artistic expression in bronze of an idea! The indomitable spirit of loyalty and a love of country and creed all summed up in the depiction of Joan, Maid of Orléans. The sculpture measures about 17 1/2 inches from the bottom of the base to the top of the head, 19 1/2 inches from the bottom of the base to her outstretched hand, 23 1/4 inches from the bottom to the spear tip of her standard. The base is about 5 1/2 inches and is basically square. The standard is inscribed with “Maria” and the kneeling angels. The sword bears the fleur-de-lis. This is a museum-grade sculpture worthy of the finest collection. We are proud to offer it on Germania’s pages.

PRICE: SOLD

 

Bismarck Statue

Bismarck Statue

Bismarck Statue
Bismarck at Versailles

Bismarck Statue

Bismarck Statue

Bismarck Statue

Bismarck Statue

Bismarck Statue

Bismarck Statue
Note the spurs

Bismarck Statue

Bismarck Statue

Bismarck Statue

Bismarck Statue

Bismarck Statue
Artist's signature

Bismarck Statue

Bismarck Statue

Bismarck Statue
Coat of arms of the Bismarck family

Bismarck Statue

Bismarck Statue
The great German statesman

Bismarck Statue
The most famed portrait of Bismarck

Bismarck Statue
A bust of Otto von Bismarck

Bismarck Statue
Prince von Bismarck accepts the surrender of Napoleon III in 1870

Bismarck Statue
Another gigantic statue of Bismarck in Germany

Statue of Prince Otto von Bismarck (Item BRONZEMET 3-16; KSTATUE 5-19)

DESCRIPTION: Here is one of the very best likenesses of the famous Iron Chancellor of Germany I have ever seen. Possibly, it is not the most glamorous, but certainly it is one of the most true-to-life depictions of the Man of Iron that we have ever seen. The firm and powerful countenance is apparent as he stands proudly and defiantly against all odds and self-assured of his agenda of unifying the German states into the German nation along with Kaiser Wilhelm I of Prussia. Together they radically and boldly brought about this their dream and managed to make it a reality after Prussia’s fabulous victory over France in 1870. Bismarck was absolutely the greatest statesman who ever dominated German and European affairs with his conservative policies from the 1860s until Kaiser Wilhelm II forced his resignation in 1890. It was at the close of the above-mentioned war with Napoleon II of France that he unified most of the German states into the powerful German empire under Prussian leadership. He then created a balance of power that preserved peace in Europe from 1871 until 1914. Otto von Bismarck became the first chancellor of a united Germany after the Treaty of Versailles and largely controlled its affairs until his dismissal in 1890. His diplomacy of real politick and his powerful leadership gained him the nickname “The Iron Chancellor.” Bismarck as a devout Lutheran was loyal to his king, Wilhelm I, who, in turn gave Bismarck his full support. Bismarck distrusted democracy and ruled through a strong, well-trained bureaucracy with the power in the hands of Junker elite representing the landed aristocracy in the east. Bismarck, an aristocratic Junker himself, had an extremely aggressive and domineering personality. Bismarck became a hero to German nationalists who built hundreds of monuments glorifying the iconic symbol of powerful conservative leadership. Historians generally praise him as a statesman of balance who kept the peace in Europe and was primarily responsible for the unification of the Fatherland. Much can be found regarding this “Enormen” or “giant” on Wikipedia. If he was not a giant in stature he certainly is thought to be one in his entire stance in the cause of his nation, his king, and his German Volk. If the truth were known regardless of whose ox is gored and one had to decide who were the greatest leaders of Germany, the names that come forth would surely be Frederick the Great, Bismarck the Iron Chancellor, and the Führer Adolf Hitler. All kinds of dubious accusations can be hurled at all three, but the fact is they were—all three of them—Germany’s greatest, elite leaders. Bismarck once said, “The more I know of men the more I love my dog!” I tend to agree!

The Statue!

The statue stands about two feet high and is in heavy bronze or possibly it is in iron. Can’t really tell because the patina certainly looks like iron. Wouldn’t that be rather apropos seeing that the figure is after all the Iron Chancellor, isn’t it? This statue was bought out of an estate of an old aristocratic German family who settled in the Philadelphia area and when the last of the line died out, this wonderful figure was sold out of the estate to a local antique dealer who in turn sold it to us. The statue is in remarkably fine condition having been carefully preserved over many years there in Philly. The sculpture is absolutely fine and the likeness to the elder statesman is phenomenal, indeed. It’s almost impossible to imagine after all those years that the spike on his Pickelhaube and his sword straps are 100-percent intact and have never been replaced. Even the most delicate items on the sculpture are intact and that would be the spurs on his boots. Consider all this because usually these items would be missing, repaired, or replaced. This statue had obviously experienced tender-loving care! He wears the Order of Hohenzollern or the Black Eagle of Prussia at his collar and the Iron Cross First Class on his coat. His dragoon helmet and his shoulder boards are correctly portrayed; his frock coat shows all the correct wrinkles and folds. The artist did sign his name on the short plinth that the chancellor stands on. I admit I can’t make out the signature, but the artist must have been one of the greats because this is a very wonderful likeness that he has created. So, here is your personal memorial to this great man of destiny–Otto von Bismarck.

PRICE: $2,600.00

 

 

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
Victory at Gran Sasso

 

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
The palm branch of victory

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
"Dem Sieger . . ."

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
". . . vom Gran Sasso . . ."

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
" . . . und Befreier . . ."

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
". . .des Duce . . ."

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
". . . SS Stuf. Otto Skorzeny. . . ."

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
" . . . Der NS-Altherrenbund . . ."

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
" . . . 'Otto Sennhofer'"

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
All glory to the hero

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
The document

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
The message

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
The letterhead

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
The organization

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
The dates

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
"Heil Hitler" and signature

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
Note the legend at the bottom of the base

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
Incredible Commando Sturmbannführer Otto Skorzeny
Skorzeny is second from the left.

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
Skorzeny received by the Führer

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
Skorzeny in his cell at Dachau

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
Funeral in Madrid

Skorzeny Desk Eagle
The showing of his many decorations at his funeral

 

INCREDIBLE!!! Gift to the Incredible Commando Otto Skorzeny (Item BRONZEMET 3-17; SS 37-3; PERS 5-6; WAF 13-2)

DESCRIPTION: Here is possibly the most important historical item we have ever had the opportunity to offer. If one thinks about the German heroes of the Second World War the one that seems to emerge very quickly and foremost is the incredible SS commando Otto Skorzeny (12 June 1908 - 5 July 1975). Otto Skorzeny was born in Vienna, Austria, into a middle-class Austrian family that had a long history of military service. In addition to his native German, he spoke excellent French. He was a noted dueling-society fencer as a member of a German National Burschenschaft when he was a university student in Vienna. He engaged in fifteen personal combats; the tenth resulted in a wound that left a dramatic dueling scar known in academic fencing as a “Schmiss” (German for “smile” or “hit” on his cheek.) In 1931, Skorzeny joined the Austrian NSDAP (Nazi Party) and soon became a member of the SA (Storm Troopers). A charismatic figure, Skorzeny played a role in the Anschluss on 12 March 1938, when he saved the Austrian president Wilhelm Miklas from being shot by Austrian National Socialists. After the 1939 German incursion into Poland, Skorzeny volunteered for service in the Luftwaffe, but was turned down because he was too tall at 1.92 meters (6 ft. 4 in.) and too old (31 years in 1939) for aircrew training. Undaunted, he joined Hitler’s bodyguard regiment, the Leibstandarte-SS Adolf Hitler (LSSAH) as an officer cadet. He then fought in the Netherlands, France, and the Balkins where he achieved distinction by forcing a large Yugoslav force to surrender following which he was promoted to Obersturmführer in the Waffen-SS. Skorzeny went to war in the USSR with the SS panzer division “Das Reich” and subsequently fought in several battles on the Eastern Front. He was in charge of a technical section of the German forces during the Battle of Moscow. More about his ”special missions” can be read about on Wikipedia. In December 1942, Skorzeny was hit in the back of the head by shrapnel from Soviet Katyusha rockets. He refused all first aid except for a few aspirin, a bandage, and a glass of schnapps. A few hours later, he rejoined his unit, but his health deteriorated and forced him to evacuate for proper medical treatment. He was awarded the Iron Cross for bravery under fire and was hospitalized in Vienna. While recuperating from his injuries he was given a staff role in Berlin where he read all the published literature he could find on commando warfare and forwarded to higher command his ideas on unconventional commando warfare. That was the beginning of a dramatic career for him and eventually he put most of all his highly unconventional ideas to use. His proposals were to develop units specializing in partisan fighting deep behind enemy lines, fighting in enemy uniform, sabotage attacks, etc. Later on, SS-Brigadeführer Walter Schellenberg, head of Amt V1 Rusland SD (the SS foreign division of the RSHA) put forth Skorzeny’s name because he had read Skorzeny’s proposal for “special units.” Then Schellenberg charged Skorzeny with command of the school organized to train operatives in sabotage, espionage, and paramilitary techniques and he personally undertook several missions where these tactics were evident.

Rescue of Benito Mussolini

In July 1945, Skorzeny was personally selected by Adolf Hitler on the advice of Schellenberg to lead the operation to rescue Hitler’s ally, Benito Mussolini. He was chosen from a group of six Luftwaffe and Heersgrupe special agents. The “Duce” had been overthrown and imprisoned by the Italian government and the pipsqueak, King Emanuel. The operation was soon to be known as the daring Gran Sasso raid and received worldwide press attention. Almost two months of cat-and-mouse escapades went on as the Italians moved Mussolini from place to place to frustrate any rescuers. Mussolini was first held in a villa on the island of La Maddalena in northern Sardinia. Skorzeny then flew over it in a Heinkel He 111 to take aerial photos of the location. Allied fighters shot down the plane over water and it was forced to ditch, but an Italian destroyer rescued Skorzeny and the crew. Mussolini was moved soon after. Information on Mussolini’s new location and its topographic features were finally secured by Herbert Kapplar, head of German police and security services in Rome. Kappler reported Mussolini was held in the Campo Imperatore at the top of the Gran Sasso Mountain and only accessible by cable car from the valley below. Skorzeny then flew over Gran Sasso and took pictures of the location with a hand-held camera. An attack plan was formulated by Skorzeny, General Kurt Student, and Major Otto-Harald Mors, the latter two of whom were paratrooper-battalion commanders. The mission was code named “Operation Oak” and 12 gliders were used very effectively in the rescue. On 12 September the Gran Sasso mission “Oak” took place and was carried out perfectly according to plan. The German combat team arriving in the gliders went to work and Mussolini was rescued without firing a single shot. Flying out in a Storch airplane Skorzeny escorted Mussolini to Rome and later to Berlin. Skorzeny received a call from an ecstatic Hitler while he was in Vienna and the Führer said, “Today you have carried out a mission that will go down in history.” This and other exploits would earn Skorzeny the sobriquet “the most dangerous man in Europe.” The exploit earned Skorzeny fame and glory, and promotion to Sturmbannführer and he received from Hitler the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross. Skorzeny’s other exploits were nothing less than fantastic even though some wonderful missions failed such as Unternehmen Weitsprung (Operation Long Jump). This was the code name given to a plot to assassinate the “Big Three”: Stalin, Churchill, and Roosevelt at the 1943 Tehran Conference. The failure of that one was in my opinion the greatest tragedy the world had ever seen other than the spring 1944 operation “Rösselsprung,” which was meant to capture or kill the Yugoslav Prime Minister, the monster Josef Broz Tito. The SS commandos very unfortunately arrived moments too late otherwise this filthy swine might have been dog meat! (Excuse my passion, but this demon was even more bloodthirsty than Stalin.) Skorzeny also helped put down the rebellion surrounding the plot to kill Hitler spending 36 hours in charge of the Wehrmacht’s central command center before being relieved. He arrived only 30 minutes after the high traitor von Stauffenberg and the other criminals had been executed. In October 1944, Hitler sent Skorzeny to Hungary after receiving word that Hungary’s regent, Admiral Miklos Horthy, was secretly negotiating with the Red Army. The surrender of Hungary would have cut off the million German troops still fighting in the Balkan Peninsula. Skorzeny, in a daring ‘snatch’ code named Operation Panzerfaust, kidnapped Horthy’s son at gunpoint, rolled him up in a carpet, and whisked him away to Vienna thus Hitler forced the father to resign as head of state. The success of the operation earned Skorzeny a promotion to SS-Obersturmbannführer. Then came Operation Greif as part of the Ardennes offensive in late 1944. Skorzeny sent in elite English-speaking Waffen-SS troops who were charged with infiltrating American lines. They were disguised in American uniforms to produce confusion to support the German attack for this last desperate campaign. Skorzeny was the commander of a composite unit, the 150th SS Panzer Brigade. A handful of his men were captured and because of interrogation by torture there spread a rumor that Skorzeny personally was leading a raid on Paris to kill (exterminate) General Dwight Eisenhower, who was not amused by having to spend Christmas 1944, isolated for security. “Ike” was actually fearfully cowering in a little French schoolhouse in mortal fear of “Scarface Skorzeny.” Ike retaliated with an all-out manhunt for Skorzeny with wanted posters distributed throughout allied-controlled territories. The posters featured a detailed description and a photograph. The Obersturmbannführer laughed heartily at this child’s play by this clownish general, the man whom British Marshal Alexander said, “I wouldn’t have him as my water boy.” Unfortunately, Eisenhower got his chance for revenge after the war when he personally gave orders that led to the murder by attrition of over a million German POWs in the prison camps along the Rhine River. (Read Other Losses by James Bacque.) After the war and subsequent to his surrender Skorzeny was held as a prisoner of war for more than two years before being tried as a war criminal at the Dachau Trials in 1947 for allegedly violating the laws of war during the Battle of the Bulge. He and nine other officers of Panzerbrigade 150 were charged with improperly using American uniforms by entering combat disguised therewith. The trial lasted more than three weeks. Ironically, on the last day of the trial on 9 September, Wing Commander F.F.E. Yeo-Thomas, recipient of the George Cross and the Croix de Guerre and who was a former British Special Operations agent testified that he and his operatives wore German uniforms behind enemy lines. That upset the apple cart. The court realizing that to convict Skorzeny could expose their own agents to the same charges so the tribunal acquitted the ten defendants. They could not prove that Skorzeny had given any orders to actually fight in U.S. uniforms. Skorzeny was detained in an internment camp at Darmstadt awaiting the decision of a denazification court. On 27 July 1948, he escaped from the camp with the help of three former SS officers dressed in U.S. military police uniforms who entered the camp and claimed that they had been ordered to take Skorzeny to Nuremberg for a legal hearing. This is the stuff that makes for fact that reads like fiction. This was just one more fantastic exploit performed by this incredible commando who was in my opinion the greatest hero of the Second World War. When I met Otto Skorzeny in Madrid in 1972, he told me that Hollywood star Burt Lancaster spent some time with him prior to a planned movie about him and his wartime adventures. Lancaster was to play the role of Skorzeny and the two men right from their first meeting became the best of friends and enjoyed to the fullest their sojourn together even though Burt’s politics were from the left and Skorzeny’s to the far right. Both of them had a common interest in sports and acrobatics; both were incurable romantics. The film, however, never materialized because certain Hollywood directors and actors were shocked to find out that a movie was to be produced that depicted a ‘Nazi’ hero and thus Burt was called home. There were many more adventures too numerous to recount here. After he was granted a passport from Franco of Spain, Skorzeny moved to Madrid. He became the Spanish coordinator of the “Odessa” (organization of former SS members). One of its purposes was to establish and facilitate secret escape routes to allow SS members to avoid capture and prosecution for alleged war crimes. Most of these men fleeing Germany and Austria were mercifully helped to escape to South America and the Middle East. The vindictiveness of the war’s victors promised all sorts of vicious retaliation against these men who were in many cases innocent of the often fictitious charges that were leveled at them. In this sense, Skorzeny again was the hero of the hour. He also set up a secret organization named Die Spinne (The Spider), which helped as many as 600 former SS men to escape to Spain, Argentina, Paraguay, Chile, Bolivia, and other countries. He also acted as an advisor to President Juan Perón of Argentina and served as bodyguard to Eva Perón. Later, he was a founder and advisor to the leadership of the Spanish neo-Nazi Group CEDADE for Círculo Español de Amigos de Europa or “Spanish Circle of Friends of Europe.” He settled in Spain, but spent six weeks at a time in Ireland where he bought an estate, but was refused a residency visa by the Irish government. He also had property in Mallorca. In the 1960s Skorzeny set up the Paladin Group, a super-spy organization based near Alicante, Spain. The group specialized in arming and training guerrillas, and their clients included the South African Bureau of State Security, Muammar Gaddafi, and some of their operatives were recruited by the Spanish Interior Ministry to wage clandestine war against Basque separatists. The hero died 5 July 1975 in Madrid. He was 67. He was given a Catholic funeral on 7 August 1975, in Madrid, but was afterwards cremated and his ashes were carried by some of his SS comrades to be interred in the Skorzeny family plot. At that time former soldiers of the Reich sang the solemn lament for the fallen: „Ich hatt’ einen Kameraden, einen bessern findst du nicht.” The song ends with: „Bleib du im ew'gen Leben Mein guter Kamerad!” ‘Translated: “I once had a comrade a better one you would not find,” and then finishes with: “You will rest in eternal life my good comrade.”

Presentation bronze sculpture

Here is the incredible gift to the man whom Charles Foley, the journalist, called the “Commando Extraordinary.” On 2 October 1943, the NS Altherrenbund der Deutschen Studenten in Vienna presented to Otto Skorzeny a beautiful little bronze desk eagle in recognition of his heroic rescue of Benito Mussolini from the mountaintop hotel, Gran Sasso. The organization is translated as the alumni of the student organization branch with the name “Otto Sennhofer.” This was the technical school that the young Otto Skorzeny attended as a youth in Vienna and later taught classes there. The fellowship of alumni thought to honor their Bundesbruder with this little remembrance of his world-famous feat of daring. All Austria and Germany and their Führer were button-busting proud of Unser Otto ([their] Otto.) He was the man of the hour!

Presentation letter

With the bronze piece is the letter on the official stationary of the NS Altherrenbund der Deutschen Studenten in Vienna. The subtitle was “the highest school group Vienna” “Altherrenschaft Otto Sennhofer.” The letter has other identifying information about the organization and its branches. It is dated 2 October 1943, and it basically reads: “Dear SS-Sturmbannführer and brother in arms, as a reward for your excellent participation and work during the rescue of the “Duce” the alumni association Otto Sennhofer presents you with this bronze sculpture with diving eagle. The presentation will be conducted at a small get-together party in our comradeship home on October 19. Heil Hitler your /s/ (signature nondiscernable) probably signed by the group’s leader. To have the actual presented bronze sculpture is “ultra rare,” but to also have the actual document of presentation is utterly remarkable!

Der “Kleine Adler”

The little eagle appears to be on glider-flight mode. Why? Because the famed rescue was accomplished with (silent) gliders. The height of the piece from the bottom of the base to the top of the wings is about 9 inches and from the rear of the tail feathers the length to the bird’s beak is about 7 inches. The circumference of the upper base is about 10 inches while the bottommost base measures 5 inches in diameter. The eagle has landed and he is clutching a palm branch, the ancient western world’s symbol of ‘victory.’ Skorzeny was certainly victorious that day and deserved not only this Roman symbol of victory, but the laurels of heroism. At the bottom of the base are the inscribed words as follows: “1943 - Der Sieger vom Gran Sasso und Befreier des Duce, SS Stuf. Otto Skorzeny. Der NS–Altherrenbund Otto Sennhofer Translated: “The victor of the Gran Sasso and rescuer of the Duce, SS-Sturmführer Otto Skorzeny from the National Socialist old student bund with the name ‘Otto Sennhofer’ 1943.” Without a single doubt this is the grandest item of historical importance that we have ever acquired and it seems a fitting memorial to this daring soldier of two fatherlands that for that moment in history became one Germanic nation. He is a hero practically without equal. We need another Skorzeny ‘now’ perhaps a dozen or so like him. I always thought that a final wonderful mission for him that would have been a well-deserved nose tweaking to the stupid western democracies would have been for Skorzeny and ex-SS commandos to effectuate the rescue of Rudolf Hess, but more the pity it was not done.

PRICE: $25,000.00 and certainly worth much more

 

Stamp Act Sculpture

Stamp Act Sculpture

Stamp Act Sculpture
The Stamp Act scroll

Stamp Act Sculpture

Stamp Act Sculpture

Stamp Act Sculpture

Stamp Act Sculpture

Stamp Act Sculpture
The Stamp Act seal

Stamp Act Sculpture
Poster depicting how the colonists felt about the act

Stamp Act Sculpture
Tarring and feathering a revenuer
(a good Idea even today!)

Stamp Act Sculpture
The effigy and the British boot hanging in the Liberty Tree

Stamp Act Sculpture
Stamp Act official beaten by patriots

Stamp Act Sculpture
Reading the Stamp Act

Stamp Act Sculpture
“Hang the tax-collector bastards!”

Stamp Act Sculpture
Note the liberty cap on a pole in the picture

 

Original Bronze Sculpture of an American Revolutionary Patriot who Undoubtedly Belonged to the “Sons of Liberty” (Item BRONZEMET 3-18; USARTICLES 3-7)

DESCRIPTION: Here is possibly one of the most important historical bronzes we have ever obtained depicting one of our American epochs of glory.
(In my opinion the American Revolutionary War and the subsequent War of 1812 were the only wars that the nation fought that were morally and ethically acceptable!)
This very dramatic statue depicts one of the prerevolutionary patriots who surges forward in the cause of liberty while stepping on the infamous Stamp Act. The bronze sculpture is very heavy seemingly of solid bronze. It is also a fairly large piece–28 ½ inches high. The figure holds his sword, commonly called a ‘hanger’ or short sword, in one hand ready for battle and in the other he holds the American flag that for him is the holy ensign. The flag is held unfurled, but at the ready to be cast forth in full display in the cause of liberty. The man wears the revolutionary cap so reminiscent of the times and the cause. Behind him is the stump of the tree that was all that remained from 1775 after the British felled it. The tree stood in Boston near Boston Common in the days before the American Revolution, 1776-1783. In 1765, colonists in Boston staged the first act of defiance against the British government at the tree. The tree then became a rallying point to the rule of Britain over the American colonies and it was for this reason that prompted the British soldiers to cut it down. However, it can never be forgotten that in a letter to a fellow patriot, Thomas Jefferson said: “The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.” It is a fact of American history that on 14 August 1765, a crowd gathered in Boston under the large elm tree at the corner of Essex Street and Washington Street to protest the hated Stamp Act. Patriots, who later called themselves the Sons of Liberty, had hanged Andrew Oliver in effigy in the branches of the tree. Oliver was the colonist chosen by King George III to impose the Stamp Act and right up there in the tree along with the effigy hung a British cavalry jackboot. Grinning from inside the boot was a devil-like doll holding a scroll marked “Stamp Act.” On 10 September, a sign saying “Tree of Liberty” was nailed to the trunk of the tree. On the bronze statue offered here is a scroll marked “Stamp Act” and is seen at the feet of our patriot Colonist soldier, and behind him is seen the stump of the Tree of Liberty. This sculpture is not signed. Why? we do not know for it truly is a wonderful depiction of American resolve and independence. It had to be by a masterful sculptor indeed. The drama and historical excellence is most noteworthy. We have dealt in bronze statuary for decades and have never seen a first-class sculpture depicting this glorious and turbulent era. Here is a true rarity that serves as a fitting memorial to supreme patriotism and courage of those brave men who risked their property and even their lives in the cause of freedom. Would that we could see such men step forward now that America so desperately needs them.

PRICE: P.O.R.

 

 

 

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