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Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Antique Weapons

 

 

Renaissance Dagger

Renaissance Dagger

Renaissance Dagger

Renaissance Dagger
Is this that awful Borgia woman?

Renaissance Dagger

Renaissance Dagger

Renaissance Dagger

Renaissance Dagger

Renaissance Dagger

Renaissance Dagger

Renaissance Dagger
Note the skull and crossbones

Renaissance Dagger

Renaissance Dagger

Renaissance Dagger

Renaissance Dagger

Renaissance Dagger

Petite Dagger of the Renaissance Style (Item ANTWEP 1-1; KWEP 5-7)

DESCRIPTION: This is a very ornate little dagger with various jewels studded into its design; this diminutive but deadly weapon puts one in mind of the ill-famed Borgia family of Renaissance Italy. Actually, little daggers like this one became popular in several European nations. Their beauty and their suggestion of malevolence made for many a tale of murder and intrigue. Lucrezia Borgia would have been very appreciative to receive a gift like this and possibly that is a depiction of this lady that is seen on the grip featured in high relief holding a sword. We do not claim that his piece is from the Renaissance period, but possibly! It’s hard to tell, but it certainly is centuries old and beautifully executed. We are not gemologists so we can’t verify the type of gems emplaced, but they look like Persian turquoise and rubies. The bronze work is magnificent and on the crossguard is a silver skull and crossbones that seems to indicate the purpose of the weapon. The deadly double-edged blade is hand chased with some design of sorts. It is 8 inches long in its scabbard. The scabbard is covered in a maroon-colored fabric that truly show its age. Some of the smaller stones are missing as would be expected of something as ancient as this one. Petite daggers like this made their way from Italian craftsmen to such countries as Germany, Poland, and Russia. Fine ladies loved to carry them as novelty or actual defense. They were a gift of choice between royalty and landed gentry and they cost a pretty penny in their day. This is a true museum piece and should be displayed in very special presentation.

PRICE: $2,800.00; a steal!

 

 

Slave-Trader's Knife

Slave-Trader's Knife

 

Slave-Trader's

Slave-Trader's

Slave-Trader's

Slave-Trader's

Slave-Trader's

Slave-Trader's

Slave-Trader's

Slave-Trader's

Slave-Trader's

Slave-Trader's

Slave-Trader's

Slave-Trader's
Inspection by slave master for illness

Slave-Trader's
African slaves being sold into slavery

Slave-Trader's
A slaver's canoe

 

Dagger of a Master of the Slave Trade (Item ANTWEP 1-2; KWEP 5-9)

DESCRIPTION: Here we present the dagger said possibly to have belonged to Aaron Lopez (1731-1782), who was the most notorious of the slave-dealing Jews. He was Newport’s leading participant in the Black Holocaust, its largest taxpayer, and the epitome of the Newport slave-trading Jewish culture. His son-in-law, Abraham Pereira Mendes, carried on the murderous trade and built massive wealth in his own right. Born in Portugal, Lopez moved to Newport, Rhode Island, in 1752, renounced his Marrano past and built an extensive trans-Atlantic slave-trade empire. “What can be said about this most attractive figure,” writes Dr. Marcus, “is that he lived on a baronial scale, maintained an entourage of over thirty persons, including the necessary slaves and hired servants, and had his own stable and two chaises.” He was engaged extensively in smuggling and the owner of between 30 and 40 ships. By 1749, Lopez was generally considered to be one of the largest merchants in the country, shipping every marketable item including molasses, Blacks, rum, pork, and bottled beer. He owned a wharf; arranged for building, chartering, and outfitting the vessels; hired captains and crews; and kept detailed accounts. Lopez reportedly launched his career as a slave merchant late in 1761, when he and Jacob Rodriguez Rivera began to outfit their jointly owned brigantine, Grayhound, for an African voyage. On January 7, 1763, William Pinnegar captained a Lopez ship, which delivered 134 Africans to Lopez’s Jewish agents, Da Costa and Farr, in South Carolina. Four captains made thirteen of the voyages, two of whom died in Lopez’s service. The dagger eventually belonged to Abraham Pereira Mendes, the son-in-law of Aaron Lopez, and was purchased from Abraham’s grandson, who inherited it. It has been in the notorious family all through the many years. The whole family was extremely wealthy and Aaron, Abe, and the succeeding generations engaged in hunting animals as well as slaves. One for sport and the other for huge profit! The dagger speaks for itself with the double-faced pommel that depicts two heads and faces of African natives (slaves). This could be a fanciful and expensive article of sporting wear (a hunting knife) in the European tradition, but it also would be a deadly weapon of defense if needed as such. Slave trading could be dangerous in those days not only from rebellious slaves but from customers who felt they were cheated. The dagger is of most fine and elegant workmanship and its blade is engraved "Me Fecit Solingen"; translated (“I am made in Solingen.”) and on the other side it is signed “Johann Horn,” who just had to have been a master swordsmith at the time. The finest edged weapons over several centuries came from Solingen, Germany masters and these slavers were rich enough to be able to order the very best and most expensive. The grip on the dagger is of bone and excellently carved with a basket weave effect. The fittings are all brass. The scabbard is of tough elephant hide. The weapon is worthy of kings but was owned by men wealthier than most kings when their nefarious gains might be recounted. The knife is by all accounts a masterpiece of the sword cutler’s art; it’s a museum piece personified and possibly the finest dagger that we have ever offered. I’m sure it cost a pretty penny in its day if for no other reason than the slave trade was the most rewarding business in the world in the 18th and 19th centuries and the men who engaged in it were not only ruthless and cruel, but also the “dandies of the walk” sparing themselves nothing that money could buy. You will possibly never find any weapon of the bloody past of slave trading that will equal this one for beauty and historical importance

PRICE: SOLD IN 1997

 

 

Baker Blunderbuss

Baker Blunderbuss

Baker Blunderbuss

Baker Blunderbuss
Distinctive Baker trigger guard

Baker Blunderbuss

Baker Blunderbuss
All Baker

Baker Blunderbuss

Baker Blunderbuss

Baker Blunderbuss

Baker Blunderbuss
Typical Baker patchbox

Baker Blunderbuss

Napoleon’s Nemesis-The Baker Blunderbuss (Item ANTWEP 1-3; BRITSCOT 4-23)

DESCRIPTION: Many gun collectors are familiar with the Baker rifle—Britain’s “Ace in the Hole”—that served the empire well in the Peninsular Campaign and at Waterloo. I am going to call this one “Lord Nelson’s handy-dandy Blunderbuss.” The Baker rifle was a rifled firearm accurate up to 250 yards. It was an improvement on the famed “Brown Bess” and the Bess was the standard military flintlock musket of England for over a hundred years. Gunsmith Ezekiel Baker of 24 White Chapel Road in London patented the Baker rifle. The rifles were equipped with a very distinctive brass patchbox door on the butt and were marked with the word tower and G.R. under a crown (later versions were marked “Enfield”). The brass trigger guard was its most recognizable feature shaped like an elongated ‘S’ enabling a firm grip on the rifle for precise trigger let-off. The stocks were fashioned with a raised cheek piece on the left of the butt, and carried a brass escutcheon at the upper wrist. The weapon is very popular to collectors and they fetch a high premium whenever found. Now! Since we know that these Baker rifles were carried by the Redcoats in the Napoleonic Wars (soldiers of the line) and we know there was also a Baker cavalry carbine, as well, all of them employing these distinctive features, then we would assume that there almost had to be a Baker for naval use! Now for the first time ever we have found the ultra-rare prototype Baker “Blunderbuss.” You will note that stock, lock, butt patchbox, and trigger guard are 100 percent Baker. No other gun has these distinctive features. It just follows that the makers and suppliers in that period would not ignore the needs of Admiral Nelson’s Royal Navy. There are no markings at all on the gun barrel or anywhere else. We earnestly believe we have a unique prototype that may have been made as the prototype, but after Waterloo. The use for it certainly diminished and it evidently was never actually put into production. So, here we have what almost certainly is a unique and prodigiously rare weapon. Baker rifles are some of the most expensive antique firearms ever offered. And of course that would make this twice as rare at least! And at a very reasonable price. Rod Akeroyd in England was recently offering one of the Baker rifles with bayonet for 7,000 pounds sterling.

PRICE: SOLD

 

 

Civil War Pistol-Carbine

Civil War Pistol-Carbine

Civil War Pistol-Carbine

Civil War Pistol-Carbine

Civil War Pistol-Carbine

Civil War Pistol-Carbine

Civil War Pistol-Carbine

Civil War Pistol-Carbine

Civil War Pistol-Carbine

Civil War Pistol-Carbine

Civil War Pistol-Carbine

Civil War Pistol-Carbine

Civil War Pistol-Carbine

Civil War Pistol-Carbine

Civil War Pistol-Carbine

Civil War Pistol-Carbine
Union soldier with Mod. 1855 pistol-carbine

Model 1855 U.S. Percussion Pistol-Carbine (Item ANTWEP 1-4; USARTICLES 2-31)

DESCRIPTION: This is one of the most interesting American arms of the 19th century. The model 1855 was an interesting hybrid sporting a 12-inch 58-cal. rifled barrel and as a pistol had all the "grace and manageability of an anvil." It had a Maynard tape primer system. Patented by Dr. Edward Maynard in 1845. The M. 1855 had a full-length stock, brass furniture, and a carbine-style swivel ramrod. More importantly it was issued with a detachable, brass-mounted butt stock also, that it could be employed as a carbine. To economy-minded ordnance officials that seemed to be a dream come true—two arms for one! What could be better? The pistol sans the butt stock is 17 ¾ inches long and weighs a muzzle heavy four pounds, 2 ounces as opposed to the M. 1843, which had an overall length of 14 inches and weighed a pound less. All in all, it looked like a pretty tidy package, one for which then Secretary of War, Jefferson Davis, felt would be just the ticket for both Dragoons and Cavalry. Unfortunately, the troopers didn’t agree as some design flaws appeared. The Maynard tape primer was deemed less than reliable by most who tried it and a major concern was the claw-type butt stock attachment which was not particularly effective. Future Confederate General, Richard Ewell, evaluated the arm in 1858 and found that the wobbly butt-to-pistol fit was detrimental to good accuracy. Cavalrymen were issued with a set of pommel holsters, one for the pistol and one for the stock; a very rare accoutrement today. Slightly more than 4,000 Mod 1855s were manufactured between 1855 and 1857 and issued to units in the west where they were found to be at least serviceable. With the onset of the Civil War the pistol-carbine was given a new lease on life and many were carried by regulars and state troops, north and south, and photographs that show troopers with Model 1855s and the worn condition of surviving specimens seem to indicate considerable usage –at least in the early months of the war. One can assume that as better arms became available, the 1855 was eventually returned to stores, though it is possible that arms-hungry rebels held onto them longer than did their Yankee counterparts. One thing that cannot be denied is the novelty of the piece. It was the only pistol of its type to ever be issued as primary standard to American troops and while it might not have been highly valued during its service lifetime, today it is one of the most sought-after collector firearms imaginable. It only took 158 years to come into its own. The pistol we offer is in beautiful condition. We think there is a possibility that the pistol is a prototype. It is exactly as described throughout many either offered or researched on the internet, but there are a few notable exceptions. First, the pistol grip unlike others seen on the web is finely checkered. This could have been accomplished after issue, but we doubt it. It looks factory to us. There is no date on the lock plate as seen on others. Model 1855 pistol-carbines were not serialized, but confusingly carried assembly numbers stamped on the lower rear of the pistol butt cap and lower tang of the butt stock pretty much always with these two parts. The one we offer has neither. The butt stock fits loose and shaky but the National Firearms Museum that is associated with the NRA describes this phenomenon, thusly: “One problem with this firearm was a tendency of the stock attachment to loosen after use.” This was often problematical to drawing a good aim with the gun because the weapon was not stable in many cases. The only marking is “VP” where the barrel meets the wood. Everything about this pistol seems to say “I am a rare prototype!” There are several copies available on the web of this pistol and stock, but this is definitely not one of them. The gun is very obviously genuine and of the period. The wood on the pistol stock matches very closely the wood on the pistol. I believe this is a very rare and highly desirable piece of American history.

PRICE: $6,500.00

 



 

 

Spanish Miguelet Pistol
Spanish Miguelet Pistol

Spanish Miguelet Pistol
Spanish Miguelet Pistol
Spanish Miguelet Pistol
Belt hook
Spanish Miguelet Pistol
Spanish Miguelet Pistol
Spanish Miguelet Pistol
Note touch marks
Spanish Miguelet Pistol
Spanish Miguelet Pistol
Touch mark on frizzon pan
Spanish Miguelet Pistol
Spanish Miguelet Pistol
Spanish Miguelet Pistol

Spanish Miguelet Pistol of the 17th Century (Item ANTWEP 1-5)

DESCRIPTION: This is essentially NOT a German weapon but it was so popular that many of these exquisite pieces were sold and imported to countries all across the continent.  This is an especially excellent example in beautiful condition throughout.  The firing mechanism for the typical Spanish (Fusil) was the Spanish lock (Ilva Espanola) of the flintlock type referred to as “miguelet”.  This particular piece may well have been made in Elbar in the late 1600’s. It has the typical patilla lock produced during the late 17th and entire 18th centuries.  The lock maker stamp or ‘punson” can be seen on the “Kence” or (Srike Flange).  The pistol was considered the top of the line in those days. (State of the art).  This one is a fine example with the belt hook addition by its former 17th century owner.  It is highly decorative usually signifying ownership by a member of the Royalty or landed gentry.  It has extremely fine engraving on the Hammer parts and “fience’. The lock plate also bears the markers mark with a crown and that usually would indicate that the gunsmith had the Royal Commission for producing the weapons. The barrel often would be produced by a barrel maker and joined upon completion to the other parts often made by yet anther artisan.  The barrel has separate touch marks one of which is a rampant lion and the other a winged apparition of some kind.  There are several other marks on the barrel that appear to be set in gold. The wood of the stock looks to be intact and never mended.  There is a large brass plate  on the pistol grip and the back lock is highly engraved with a rather crude depiction of a female face. The butt end piece is large with depiction of regimental flags and drum and the end cap is a grotesque face looking quite angry. The trigger guard is also engraved. The weapon is on A-1 firing order and the whole pistol is in very excellent shape for being produced about 1680. There cannot be many of these around except in first rate museums in Spain and other European countries. This is ultra special at a very decent price. Well what would you prefer, dirty old Greenback’s losing value everyday or 401-k’s that are dangerous today or would you prefer a wonderful relic from the days of swashbuckling high adventure? Think about it!

PRICE: SOLD

 

 

 

Sinclair Sword

Sinclair Sword
Soldier in the middle is armed with a Sinclair hilt broadsword and wears a comb morion.

Sinclair Sword

Sinclair Sword

Sinclair Sword

Sinclair Sword

Sinclair Sword

Sinclair Sword

Sinclair Sword

Sinclair Sword

Sinclair Sword

Sinclair Sword

Sinclair Sword

Sinclair Sword
Other Sinclair hilt swords

Massive “Sinclair” Hilt Sword (Era 1612) (Item ANTWEP 1-6; BRITSCOT 4-25; SCOTWEAPON 1-12)

DESCRIPTION: Here is one of the most homely yet most historically important swords that we have ever obtained. It has the name Sinclair Sword and is named after Colonel George Sinclair who commanded a Scottish mercenary band that tried to fight its way across Norway in 1612, but was routed in the Gudron Valley. Sinclair’s name has ever since been attached to this type of sword hilt. Collectors and weapon experts advance the likely theory that George Sinclair’s mercenaries brought these massive swords to Scotland after cutting a swath of bloody battle across central Europe. These swords were one of the earliest basket-hilt designs and originally were of south-German origin. On average, the blade on one of these massive swords measured from 32 to 38 inches. This one we offer is measured at 33 inches with a thickness of 2 inches wide. “A bonnie blade.” The Sinclair hilt broadsword had great influence on the development of the Scottish basket-hilted Claymore, which was used by Highlanders in the 17th and 18th centuries. After the Jacobean Wars it became for all intents and purposes a symbol of Scotland. The Sinclair sword’s hilt has long recurved quillons with a ring guard or knuckle guard. It has an oversized pommel of the scent-stopper variety. The grip is short with chainmail-type metal wrapping. Sinclair swords all have great broad blades and always are curved with deep fullers as this one has. These swords are very rare and usually seen today for the most part in museums and advanced collections. We have had quite a few Scottish swords, but this one is the earliest one we have ever had. It would be considered in excellent rare condition and “BONNIE WEE WEEAPON” indeed!

PRICE: SOLD

 

 

Savoyard Helmet

Savoyard Helmet

 

Savoyard Helmet

Savoyard Helmet

Savoyard Helmet

Savoyard Helmet

Savoyard Helmet

Savoyard Helmet

Savoyard Helmet

Savoyard Helmet

Savoyard Helmet

Savoyard Helmet

Savoyard Helmet

Savoyard Helmet

Savoyard Helmet

Savoyard Helmet

Savoyard Helmet

 

Savoyard Helmet (The Original Totenkopf Helmet–1600) (Item ANTWEP 1-7; KWEP 5-10; KHELMET 2-17; KSPEC 1-6)

DESCRIPTION: We are proud to offer an original Savoyard helmet from the era of 1600. Head pieces of this distinctive fashion were intended for wear by the mounted Cuirassier or heavy cavalryman. They are usually referred to as “Savoyard” helmets from the tradition that large numbers of them in Les Musées d’Arte et d’Histoire in Geneva were taken as booty from the troops of Charles Emmanuel I of Savoy following their unsuccessful assault on the city of Geneva on the night of 11 December 1602. (See Claude Blair European Armous London 1958 P. 150 and Jose A Goday “Los Armets Savoyards Du Musee D’ Arte Et D’ Histoire De Geneve N.S. Vol. L 2002 PP 11-97.) The helmet was known as Todenkopf or in more modern German Totenkopf (Death’s Head). This term arises from the German denotation for skull, Saxony being a Germanic Provence. The name emanates from the terrifying appearance of this helmet with its black-hued surface and the visor in the shape of a stylized grotesque face with dark eyeholes. Being the elite troops of the early 17th century the Savoyard were the heavy cavalry. Charles Emanuel, Duke of Savoy, contributed significantly to the reputation of this Totenkopf cavalry and led to the denotation–Savoyard helmet. So it occurs that in 1602 Charles attempted to besiege the city of Geneva and commanded 2000 combatants to surround the city walls during the night of December 11. When the ring was closed at 2 o’clock the duke implemented an interesting maneuver. The 200 members of the heavy cavalry were ordered to dismount and climb the walls in their impressive armor and Totenkopf helmets using the element of surprise. The guards were to be “overmastered” (slain) in order to open the city gate for the main forces to enter; however, the alarm was raised by a night watchman and Geneva’s militia rose to meet the invaders. The attempted raid was a disastrous failure. Fifty-four Savoyards were killed and many more captured. Charles Emmanuels’ army retreated in a panic and the Savoyard prisoners were executed. Until the present day, the events of the Geneva raid and the successful defense of the city are celebrated each year at the festivities of the Escalade de Genève. Defeating the invaders, Geneva’s militia captured their plate armor which became a kind of war trophy. Some of the pieces are on view at Geneva’s Musées d’Arte et d’Histoire. Other helmets entered the art market in the course of time. Possibly, this helmet that we offer was once a trophy from this battle. On the other hand, the term “Savoyard” helmet being known as such from the events of Geneva shall not lead to the conclusion that this style helmet subsequently was not used by other heavy cavalry on the continent though it was most assuredly Germanic.

The Helmet

The measurements are 13 inches high from the end of the bib collar to the top comb of the headpiece. It measures 1 foot across from side to side of the collar. There is a little hook device that holds the helmet in place until it is ready to be worn. This is found just above the collar and attaches to the faceplate. This must be released also before pulling the entire mask upward to reveal the man’s face. Unique to this style of helmet are the sunshades over the eyeholes giving an even greater grotesque appearance, but this might also deflect direct sword slashes that would be directed toward the head. The collar is constructed of three layers of iron gorgets pinioned by numerous round-top rivet-looking pieces securely fastened, but giving flexibility to the wearer to move upward and downward at will. At the back there is a plume holder that would accept a colorful feather display worn at victory parades and official reviews. The helmet is in truly remarkable condition throughout and is certainly a genuine museum piece and a worthy relic of the days of knightly valor and high adventure!

PRICE: $25,000.00

 

 

Widmann Sword

Widmann Sword

 

Widmann Sword

Widmann Sword
Backside

Widmann Sword
Knuckle bow

Widmann Sword
Typical Widmann eagle

Widmann Sword
Bone grip

Widmann Sword

Widmann Sword

Widmann Sword

Widmann Sword
Door dent

Widmann Sword
Two Widmann swords pictured

Widmann Sword
Another typical Widmann

Widmann Sword

Widmann Sword

 

Excellent Widmann Eagle-Head Sword (c. 1840s) (Item ANTWEP 1-8; USARTICLES 3-2)

DESCRIPTION: Here is an excellent example of the famed Widmann sword with bone grips with Federal eagle clamshell guard. This one has the Widmann touch all the way and the eagle’s head is 100 percent the F.W. Widmann type VI. This is clearly an infantry-officer’s sword of the 1840 period. It has the typical Widmann finish with silver wash or plate which brings out all the fine detail consistent with Widmann swords. Frederick Widmann was the greatest sword cutler in America operating out of Philadelphia, where he opened shortly after embarking from Bremen, Germany. It is quite possible that he received his training in sword cutlery in Bremen as that North Sea port and its smaller companion port of Emden were the two principal overseas shipping points for the Solingen Blade trade; therefore, it is hardly strange that Widmann almost exclusively employed utility-grade Solingen blades in conducting his business in America. Widmann’s forenames–Frederick Wilhelm—have a Prussian ring to them which may mean nothing; however, he kept a tinted engraving of the Prussian King Frederick the Great in a prominent location in his home suggesting a strong sense of Prussian pride. The eagle’s head on the sword we offer is the personification of the Prussian Adler (eagle). The “Alte Fritz” Frederick would have loved it. Nothing could be more Prussian. The sword we offer is unusual in its great length of 38 inches in its scabbard. The blade shows its age. Some of the bluing is slightly discernible but the blade in general shows years of use and is a bit tired and shows old rust stains (removed). The grip shows the usual slight age crack practically always to be expected. The eagle and knuckle bow are excellent. The decoration on the knuckle bow is on the frontal side only (typical Widmann). The eagle on the clamshell guard is typical of the 1840s’ style and it has a very dramatic appearance. The scabbard has a doorway crease. This often occurred when the officer would proceed through a doorway and the sword following up secured to his belt would often fail to follow the man closely enough and get slammed in the door thus receiving the doorway crease. All in all, this sword is an important and handsome relic of better times in our America. It should be in a museum or a good collection like yours. Today Widmann is memorialized regularly by American sword collectors who consider appropriately that Widmann’s series of swords constitutes one of the most fascinating specialties known to their hobby.

PRICE: $1,800.00; an excellent investment for such an excellent and important piece of American history.
Germania International will not ship any item that contains any animal parts to any country where such items are prohibited!

 

 

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword

 

Revolutionary Sword
Beautiful swirl pattern

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword
Hallmarks?

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword
Hallmarks?

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword
Blade decor

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword

Revolutionary Sword
A replica of George Washington with his battle sword

Revolutionary Sword
Note the close resemblance seen between our sword and this one owned by George Washington

 

Magnificent American Revolution Silver Mounted Hanger (Sword) (Item ANTWEP 1-9; USARTICLES 3-3)

DESCRIPTION: A military hanger is a short sword with a blade averaging 24-25 inches having at least one cutting edge. The hanger was originally used by the infantryman to supplement his musket for close-in fighting. Infantry hangers are of great interest to collectors because they offer many variations. The one we offer here undoubtedly belonged to an officer who was a member of the landed gentry because practically no common soldier could have been able to afford a weapon such as this one. The normal hanger of the period would have brass fittings, wooden grip, and look quite utilitarian and rather homely. This sword, on the other hand, is quite beautiful having a deeply grooved grip with heavy silver wrapping, sculpted silver crossguard and pommel. The scabbard throat and tip are also of fine coin silver. The blade is embellished with a sun symbol emitting solar rays with an inlaid gold escutcheon on each side of the blade. The blade is 24 inches long. There seem to be hallmarks of some kind struck on the quillons, but we could not make them out. We do know that this sword is of American make. If it were British the hallmarks would be crisp and legible. Possibility: if one goes to the web site The Paul Revere House and then to the narrative entitled “What did Revere’s shop make? (According to the daybooks of 1761-1797),” the article clearly mentions a sword hilt!) We presume that the sword hilt was of silver. He may have made quite a few sword fittings because swords were one of the most-favored articles of wear in the mid-18th century. We also show images of the battle sword of George Washington, and you can readily see the similarity. Washington’s sword was produced by the American maker J. Bailey in Fishkill, New York. The English name for this style sword is “cuttoe.” The spiraling silver wire is missing on the Washington sword that is presently in the Smithsonian Institution. Our specimen; however, is in remarkably beautiful condition with its broad grip silver bands intact. For a weapon dating about 1776 or so it is indeed rare; even the leather scabbard is in immaculate condition. Where would you ever find a relic of the Revolutionary War comparable to this?

PRICE: SOLD

 

 

Flintlock Pistol

Flintlock Pistol

 

Flintlock Pistol

Flintlock Pistol

Flintlock Pistol

Flintlock Pistol
Number under grip extension

Flintlock Pistol

Flintlock Pistol

Flintlock Pistol

Flintlock Pistol
Saftey locks

Flintlock Pistol
Double hammer locks and frizzens

Flintlock Pistol
Note the barrel-switch lever

Flintlock Pistol

Flintlock Pistol
Silver-studded grip

Flintlock Pistol

Flintlock Pistol

Flintlock Pistol
Trigger guard

Flintlock Pistol
Look at the selector lever

Flintlock Pistol

 

Wonderful Four-Barreled Flintlock Pistol) (Item ANTWEP 1-10; BRITSCOT 4-26)

DESCRIPTION: Here is one of the finest multibarreled firearms we have ever offered or, for that matter, ever seen outside of the greatest weapons displays in the best of museums. This is truly a deadly little charmer. It has everything! Beauty and great functional mechanism. It has all the technical operation that would be expected of a firearm of the modern age yet it obviously is from the mid-18th century. This was the defensive or offensive dream gun because of the time needed to reload a muzzle loaded pistol with single barrel. If you missed or the gun misfired, you undoubtedly would have “bought the farm” so some enterprising gunsmiths sold multibarreled innovations to the landed gentry who could afford them. Flintlocks were designed and produced with two, three, and very rarely with four barrels for multiple shots. These designs were extremely costly to make. This example we offer would have cost a pretty penny in its day. The only one that could have exceeded it in possible effectiveness would have been the famed duck’s foot pistols that have from 4 to 8 barrels and were designed with the idea of a confrontation by one person with a group and all the barrels fired at once. They were popular with bank guards and prison wardens, and sea captains favored them when contemplating possible mutiny. These guns were extremely dangerous because if slightly overloaded with powder they could explode in the hands of the person firing them. They fired with only one flintlock hammer cock igniting all barrels at one time. The example we offer has two flintlock cocks, two triggers, and each barrel fires separately. The bottom barrels are fired with the turn of a lever seen on the side of the lock plate (see our images). The pistol measure nine inches from its butt to the end of the barrels. We can find no company markings, but there is a broad stamping with the number “334” under the grip. This would usually indicate that the weapon would have been issued presumably to a military unit but we thought it to be much too fancy for that. However, some royal factions throughout history and private landed gentry had militias that they funded and directed for personal protection and in the case of their country’s needs these militias would be volunteered to go to battle equipped with some noteworthy and expensive equipment. The gun looks to us to be of British, Irish, or Scottish origin. The latter being a good guess because of the silver tacks embedded in the grip. The side plate has the usual military motif found in pistols of the British Isles and in Irish pieces as well. This is practically always panoply of flags, standards, shield, and weapons. The other floral designs throughout are atypical of the décor-afforded weapons used in Britannia, Scotia, and Erin. The mechanics of the firing action on the gun is nothing short of fabulous and there is even a safety slide devise that locks the hammers tightly when not in use. This was, I am sure, in its day a very expensive piece but, today it is a super bargain.

PRICE: $7,500.00; Special reduction sale $4,485.00

 

 

English Sword

English Sword

 

English Sword

English Sword

English Sword
Note the dragon's head

English Sword

English Sword
Hallmark?

English Sword
Triangular blade

English Sword

English Sword
Silver-wire wrapping

English Sword

English Sword

English Sword
Blade decoration laid in gold

English Sword

English Sword
The 18th-century hallmark

English Sword

 

English “Small Sword” Dated 1712 with Silver Hilt (Item ANTWEP 1-11; BRITSCOT 4-28)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a fine, legitimate 300-year-old “small sword” with an all-silver hilt. We have looked up the English hallmark that looks like a “B” and a large “C” according to a web page by the title “Hallmarks of English and British Silver Maker’s Identification.” This mark is clearly shown as one of the hallmarks of swordsmith Thomas Farren in London 1712. British hallmarks on an item such as this do not lie. This is a 100-percent genuine three-century-old weapon.

The Sword

This is termed “the small sword” and is considered to be a descendant of the transitional rapier which itself evolved from the original rapier because of the demand for a lighter sword better suited to parrying in the event of duel or self-defense.

Colichemarde Blade

The shape of this very lethal blade features a wide forte and forte indicates the strong part of the blade; the one third closest to the hilt. The ‘strength’ refers to the control established over the opponent’s weapon. Looking down the length of the blade you will see that it is triangular shaped. This forte then tapers drastically toward the point after the fullers ended but in this example the hexagonal forte extends all the way to the tip. This configuration combines good parrying characteristics. Its lighter weight and superior balance compared to the rapier allowed faster and accurate movement of the blade allowing the wielder to place a more precise thrust on his adversary. The colichemarde first appeared about 1680 and was popular for the next 40 or 50 years at the Royal European courts and it was especially popular with the officers serving in the French and Indian War period, for instance in that particular time the young George Washington possessed one. The sword appeared about the same time as the foil; however, the former was created for practicing fencing at court where the colichemarde was created for dueling. It was perfectly designed for its only purpose and that of course was obviously the art of the ‘kill.’ This particular sword measures 35 inches long including the grip. The blade itself measures 28 ½ inches long. The all-silver grip is silver-wire wrapped and this after 300 years is in remarkably good condition. The “D” guard ends at the pommel with a dragon head. The sword has the typical English loop guard. This refers to the two ringlets that are fashioned to extend from the “D” guard down to the double-clamshell knuckle guard. This is a special feature found only on these particular swords and the sword wielder could put his forefinger through one of these loops thus giving much more of a firm and commanding grip on the sword. Although very pretty, this petite weapon was professionally designed to be the ultimate killing device. To face off with your sword against a man who is an expert swordsman with his colichemarde sword was often tantamount to suicide unless of course you were better yet!

PRICE: SOLD

 

 

American 1840 Period Sword
American 1840 Period Sword

American 1840 Period Sword
American 1840 Period Sword
American 1840 Period Sword
American 1840 Period Sword
American 1840 Period Sword
American 1840 Period Sword
American 1840 Period Sword
American 1840 Period Sword
American 1840 Period Sword
American 1840 Period Infantry Officers Sword (Item ANTWEP 1-12; USARTICLES 2-18)

DESCRIPTION: This magnificent sword is very much like the one pictured on page 171 of the book “The American Eagle Pommel Sword" by E. Andrew Mowbray. The picture is of two swords of this type and the one on the right resembles the one we offer with a few differences. First instead of a wooden wire wrapped grip, ours has a beautiful mahogany wood grip beautifully checkered and in one piece. The eagle’s head we feel is of the F.W. Widmann style for sure and is the type V1. Comparing again to the picture in the book ours has a much more elaborate clam shell guard employing Columbia seated holding the staff of revolution and the American flag shield. Above her head are the thirteen stars for the original Colonies and beside her the American Federal eagle and below the eagle; you can see the crowns of empire with the staff of royalty. This represents the victory over British rule by the American Revolutionists.  Battle axes and other weapons are seen in the background and the motto E. Pluribus Unum.  The blade is in good shape except the bluing and gilding is pretty much gone.  It has the usual engraved panoply of weapons in place on both sides.  There is a stamped mark that looks like letters under the cross guard on the blade.  The sword in its scabbard is three feet long.  It is a very handsome piece, especially the clam shell guard that is possibly unique.  Certainly the most patriotic motif that we have ever beheld.  It may have been custom made for the bearer who must have been a true American patriot in an age where such things as patriotism meant something other than loyalty to one’s favorite football team or regular attendance at NASCAR. A great museum worthy specimen of an American classic sword.

PRICE: $2,500.00

 

 

Collins Machete

Collins Machete

Collins Machete

Collins Machete

Collins Machete

Collins Machete

Collins Machete

Collins Machete

Collins Machete

Collins Machete
This was the seal of the Collins Company after
its move to Collinsville, Connecticut.

Collins Machete
Manufacturing crew in 1924

Collins Machete
Company as it looks, today

Collins Machete
Original sign

Collins Machete with the Rare ‘Lobo’ Pommel (Item ANTWEP 1-13; USARTICLES 2-33)

DESCRIPTION: Here is what must be considered rare in American knives and swords. It is a machete made in South Canton, Connecticut, by the famed Collins Company Axe Factory that began in 1826 and became the largest axe and edged-tool manufacturers in America, as well as the world. It started by turning out axes and hatchets of superior quality (finest on the market). The original location was in the town of South Canton, Connecticut. Later, the town’s name was changed to Collinsville because Collins was the one and only major employer in the district. The townsfolk voted for that change in 1834. The company succumbed to financial difficulties and even though it specialized in axes and other tools it turned to making machetes and long knives and at this time received thousands of orders from Central America and South America. The company was reorganized in 1843 under the name The Collins Company. As the years went by, the company’s export business became so important that labels and other markings were modified to include wording in Spanish. In 1876, the company began producing special animal-head pommels on its machetes that were sent to the Latin American countries. The lobo or wolf was the first of these and Collins proudly displayed such at the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition. It then produced the águila (eagle), gallo de pelea (fighting cock), and the elefante (elephant). The animal heads were in the Collins & Company catalog up to 1936. Its production ceased near the beginning of WWII. The animal-head pommels were cast in brass with one-piece fancy guards then nickel-plated later. Some of them were cast in nickel-silver (German silver) and most had glass eyes that looked like rubies. The blades came in many shapes and styles. The lobo was made without the glass eyes and the grip was entirely in brass. Some have checkered grips with the exception again of the ‘lobo’ that has smooth ribbon-effect grip. The other exception was the águila that often has a smooth horn grip and no doubt was made on special order for the elite officers of the Latin American military. The rarest model is the lobo or wolf’s head. An expert collector says on the internet that in his 20 years of collecting he has only ever seen two. These were in Peru and were described as firemen’s swords. Contact with the Canton Historical Museum in Collinsville confirmed that this was what they were called. The blade has a saw-edge feature versus a sharp edge and does not, as we have noted earlier, have glass eyes. The tang is stamped COLLINS & CO/HARTFORD/CAST-STEEL/WARRANTED. We now proudly present the ‘Lobo’ right out of the pages of history.

PRICE: SOLD

 

 

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or call at 706.782.1668.


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