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Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

World War I

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General Feldmarschall v. Mackensen Medallion (Item WWI 7-1; KMEDALS 3-10)

DESCRIPTION: This is a beautiful small medallion measuring 1 ½ inches in diameter in mint condition in the presentation case. It bears the fantastically fine portrait image of the great Field Marshal in his resplendent Hussar uniform and his family crest is shown in a shield. His medals Pour le Mérite, House Order of Hohenzollern are crisp and detailed. The saying that was echoed all over Germany comes from the call of v. Hindendurg, when he spoke of the bravery of Mackensen at Tannenburg, “Unser Marschall Vorwarts,” “Our Marshal Forward!” On the back is the leering skull of the Totenkopf Hussaren, the Death’s Head Hussars under which is a saying: "Gott vertrauen und der eigenen Kraft," "Trust in God and your own strength." Under the writing is the Prussian Guard star. His service to the Fatherland was one of the most illustrious and notable of all Prussian officers since Frederick the Great. In World War I he defeated the Russians in the battle of the Masurian Lakes (1914-15), conducted successful operations in Galicia, Serbia, and Romania, and in 1917 occupied Romania. Held by the French until December of 1919, he retired (1920) from military service and became a leader of the Stahlhelm, a monarchist veterans' organization. He later supported Adolf Hitler. He began his military service in 1869 as a volunteer with the 2nd Life Hussars regiment. During the Franco-Prussian War he was promoted to second lieutenant and recommended for the Iron Cross, Second Class. After an interlude at Halle University, Mackensen formally entered the German Army in 1873, with his old regiment. In 1891 he joined the General Staff in Berlin, where he was heavily influenced by the new chief, Alfred von Schlieffen. When Schlieffen retired in 1906, Mackensen was regarded by some as a possible successor, although the job went to Helmuth von Moltke. At the beginning of World War I Mackensen commanded XVII Army Corps as part of the Eighth Army first under General Prittwitz and then General Hindenburg and saw action in the battles of Gumbinnen and Tannenberg. Late in 1914 Mackensen took command of the new Ninth Army and was awarded the Pour le Mérite for actions around Lodz and Warsaw. Until October of 1915, Mackensen saw action in Galicia, and assisted in the capture of Przemysl and Lemberg. In October of 1915, he led a renewed Austro-German campaign against Serbia and finally crushed effective military resistance there. He followed this up in 1916 with a successful campaign against Romania (along with General Falkenhayn). For this he was promoted to Field Marshal, and he sat out the rest of the war as military governor. In 1920, Mackensen retired from the army but became very active in pro-military conservative organizations, particularly Stahlhelm and the Schlieffen Society. In the 1930's he was a visible supporter of Adolf Hitler, but his role was purely symbolic and he remained a committed monarchist; however, he was seen in full Hussar uniform very often with Hitler at the Reichsparteitag and hundreds of other NS functions. He appeared in a very moving ceremony at the funeral of Kaiser Wilhelm in Doorn, Holland in 1941. His life covered a century. He lived during four Prussian regimes. He was a pure product of Prussian soldiery whose fidelity was sworn to his emperor and later, his Führer. For him, Hitler was the man who reconciled the German people and its army. His opinion of Germany’s losses in both WWI and WWII was summoned up in his words: “Im Felde unbesiegt!,” “Undefeated in the field of battle!” Mackensen was the supreme patriot and always remained the epitome of the Prussian warrior spirit. In 1945, the proud old man beat off Russian and Polish looters that came calling in his village. He did this with sword in hand. He was 96 years old, but secure in the knowledge that he was in the Teutonic vernacular true Enormen or “giant” and the looters were Belanglosen (inconsequentials). The marshal died on November 8, 1945; his life having spanned the Kaiserreich, the Weimer Republic, and the Third Reich. To the day of his death he was a brave Hussar of the Deutsches Vaterland! The medal is a token memorial of this brave and noble man.

PRICE:  SOLD

 

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Framed Oil Painting of German Soldier of WWI (Item WWI 7-2; ART 7-10)

DESCRIPTION: This is a very special painting done in the east Saxon-style; Dunkelkunst. It is dark and cannot readily be seen until a light is put on it. It definitely needs a nice portrait light of the style that attaches to the frame. Once this is done the soft, subtle lines and colors come out magnificently. The depiction of one of the hundreds of thousands of Landsers who fought in the fields of glory and later despair. This rendering is truly what we could call a major art accomplishment. This was a very special art form practiced only it seems in Saxony in the old Kaiser Reich. “From darkness suddenly comes light.” The red scarf stood for heroism in that Germanic era. The stern expression in the young man’s face summons up his willing service to König und Vaterland, (King and Fatherland). Deuschland über Alles!. The frame is not original, but would be the style used on such a fine rendering Size in the frame is 24 ½ x 20 inches.

PRICE:  SOLD

 

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German WWI Christian Crucifix (Item WWI 7-3)

DESCRIPTION: This is one of the better ones we have ever encountered. Many of the German soldiers were Catholic, especially those from Bavaria, Germany’s largest state. This large war cross, instead of being the type personally carried by the devout soldier, is more in keeping with the type brought home and hung in private “Wohnzimmer or living rooms—a reminder of the fact that as Christ died for our sins, the German soldier died also for sacred ideals. The saying: “Viel Feind, Viel Ehre,” “Many enemies, much honor.” Never in the history of the world’s terrible wars did a saying like mean more than to the Deutsches Lanser both in WWI and WW II. In my opinion, Germany suffered the fate of Jesus for basically the same reasons and darkness still descends. The cross is of wood and the Christ figure is of a composition material. It is 24 inches high and 12 inches wide. The words “Kriegs Andenken” mean “War Remembrance.” This is not only an important historical relic, but it should be a reminder that we of the west should never again have a ‘Brother War.’ Let the saber-rattling despots fight it out amongst themselves. Let them send their sons and daughters into the terrible fray!

PRICE: SOLD

 

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German U-boat (Item WWI 7-4; KRIEG 5-3)

DESCRIPTION: This is the framed cover of a German boys’ magazine called Jugend (Youth). It’s just a great depiction of a Haupt Matrosen (Skipper? Sailor?) on the windblown deck of a WWI U-boat. The edition was in 1915 and it is signed, but we at Germania cannot make out the signature. It is beautifully done and is mounted in a great-looking, burl-looking frame. It’s just great for a WWI or naval collection.

PRICE: $125.00

 

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German-American Badge from 1913 (Item WWI 7-5; KJEWELRY 2-11

DESCRIPTION: This is a very interesting badge featuring the 1813 Iron Cross in its center. This commemorates the Volkerschlacht, or Battle of Nations, at Leipzig against the French under Napoleon and it was celebrated at Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1913 (100-year celebration). It says: “Gedenkfier Leipzig 1813-1913 Cincinnati.” A small ribbon of the American flag is part of the suspension with the German colors of black, white, red in a streamer suspended from the American flag. The company name is on the back: “G.G. Wright & Son Cincinnati. It measures about an inch and a half in diameter. This is a great little remembrance of the times when America was pro-German and it should have stayed that way! Germans were our better friends than the British, by far.

PRICE:  SOLD

 

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German-American Badge from 1913 (Item WWI 7-6)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a real quality pendant with a great coin-style visage of WW I’s hero commander, General Field Marshall von Hindenburg. The reverse side has portraits of Kaiser Wilhelm II in the helmet of the Garde du Corps. Around the edges it says” “Völker Krieg 1914-15,” “People’s War.” It measures about 1 inch in diameter. It’s a magnificently struck medal of fine, coin quality. Detail as perceived through a glass is truly astounding!

PRICE:  SOLD

 

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Beautiful Patriotic Prussian Pin (Item WWI 7-7; KJEWELRY 2-12)

DESCRIPTION: This is a little gem of the jeweler’s art: a silver-plated badge with black, white, red enameled border. The Prussian eagle is with wings extended. It measures about 1 1/4 inches in diameter with protrusions all around that look like tips of swords. Under the eagle it says: “Fürs Vaterland,” “For the Fatherland!.” This is a very nice WW I memento.

PRICE: $125.00

 

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Patriotic Iron Cross Pin (Item WWI 7-8; KJEWELRY 2-13)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a nice little enameled badge depicting the Iron Cross, 1914. These were often worn by veterans who had won the coveted award. It is about 1 inch in diameter. There are no marking. It has nice enamel work with green oak-leaf motif.

PRICE: SOLD

 

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Imperial Eagle Change Purse (Item WWI 7-9; KMISC 1-7)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a very nice little patriotic change purse with a lovely embossed Imperial Eagle of the Hohenzollern Dynasty. It has a double pocket inside for coins and possible a folded bill or two. It has a nice little snap-shut device on the back. It’s a petite, but great, WWI souvenir.

PRICE:  SOLD

 

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Statue of WW I German Soldier (Item WWI 7-10)

DESCRIPTION: This is a handsome depiction in base metal with bronze finish. This is a Bavarian Landser wearing the rifleman’s Jäger Shako on his head. Everything is 100 percent accurate. The overall condition is excellent. Remarkably the bayonet is there and perfect. He wears all the equipment of the German combat soldier. This is a presentation statue to someone for true or loyal cooperation or duty with the Reich’s Veterans’ Organization in Frankenthal. Für Treue Mitarbeit Reichskriegerbund Frankenthal.” The figure is 9 inches tall. The base is 2 1/2 inches square. The rifle is 5 inches long. This is a very handsome art object of the “War to End All Wars.” If only!!!

PRICE: SOLD

 

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Imperial War Flag (Item WWI 7-11; KCLOTH 1-11)

DESCRIPTION: Here is one beautiful example of this the world’s most dramatically beautiful flag, the Reichskriegflagge. This was strictly the military flag of the Kaiser’s empire. No flag of any nation was as bold and martial as this one. In its center is the Imperial Prussian Eagle and up in the left corner the Iron Cross and the colors of the empire—black, white, red. The size of this one is 130 x 81 inches (big). This was the size flown from U-boats in WW I. This flag is most closely associated with the Imperial Navy because from the time a German ship of war left port until its return it flew this, the flag of war! There are quite naturally a few moth holes here and there, but the general shape of this magnificent relic is quite remarkably good. Here is the most sought-after flag of Germanophiles worldwide and we are very proud to offer it to the collecting public.

PRICE: $1,480.00

 

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Bilderfolge, Picture Folder of WW I Officers and Leaders (Item WWI 7-12)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a great historical item of German military art. It is what is know as a Bilderfolge, or folder, with original prints from the period of the most famous of the personalities of the time of the Great War. The cover bears an embossed picture depicting the riders in the sky as the (heroes) guide the marching soldiers below. The seal of the Reinertrag appears with the word “The best of the German Army.” There is an original letter inside from this organization speaking of the folder. Inside are eight beautiful editions of what may have originally been charcoal drawings of the most famous generals and leaders. They measure 9 x 13 inches and are in wonderful shape. There are also a couple of pages of text with color pictures and a beautiful memorial sheet to commemorate the fallen soldiers of the war. The cover is a bit tattered at the bottom edge, but holding well. This is an especially fine important historical item that should be preserved.

PRICE: $950.00; very reasonable

 

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German Soldier’s Diary and Autograph Book (Item WWI 7-13)

DESCRIPTION: This is a leather-covered little book that was found in the field pack of a fallen German soldier in a battlefield of WW I. It was brought home by an American soldier who kept it up until his death in 1972. This American soldier would often look at it and reminisce about the horrible war and think about the poor dead young solder and what the lad meant to his family who lost him. The opening page is from the youngster’s pastor who writes inspiring words and prays for the safety of the young man who goes to war “but those who the Lord loves most he takes in early years.” The book has the Hohenzollern National Eagle embossed on its cover. It is filled with written notes from family and friends. The man’s name, Gunter Meyer Hermann, is in the front and is dated 1917. It measures 5 x 7 1/2 inches and is in remarkably good condition.

PRICE:  SOLD

 

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Group of Cards of WWI Pictures (Item WWI 7-14)

DESCRIPTION: Here are 118 color cards from a German tobacco company. These were found one to a pack in German cigarettes. You would collect them and eventually put them into an album provided by the company to make up a complete book. They are quite dramatic little pictures showing German, Austrian, and Hungarian soldiers, and even portrait pictures of their enemies, artillery, infantry, war dogs, mountain troops, generals, and grunts. All imaginable are in these 2 x 2 1/2 inch-size portraits. These are great for the WWI enthusiast.

PRICE: Sold

 

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Patriotic Medal in Bronze (Item WWI 7-15; NSD 10-6)

DESCRIPTION: This is an art medal that on its face shows an Aryan German soldier stripped naked and chained to the rock like Prometheus of Grecian legend. Below his feet lies the German Stalhelm (helmet). This is a parody on Germany’s having lost all because of the horrible Versailles Treaty. On the back is a legend that translated means: ‘The Reich will never be destroyed if we hold together and be loyal.’ This is a fine historically important piece.

PRICE: SOLD

 

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WWI Iron Cross Ring made in the 1930s (Item WWI 7-16; GEN 9-19)

DESCRIPTION: This is not the patriot ring that the German government used to give when you turned in your wedding band or other gold rings. This was the ring worn by persons who had actually won the Iron Cross in either class. The detail is extra fine and in this small cross you can actually read the details. The 1914 and the crown are plainly to be perceived. The sides of the ring shank have a beautiful spray of oak leaves. This is quite nice and made in the 1930s and 1940s.

PRICE: $225.00

 

 

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 Art Medal of Graf von Spee by Karl Goetz (Item WWI 7-17; KMEDAL 4-9; KRIEG 5-9)

DESCRIPTION: All have heard of the ill-fated magnificent Panzershiffe (battleship) Graf Spee. This was the flagship of the German Navy. It was launched in October 1932 and scuttled on December 17, 1939 in Uruguayan waters after seeing action with British Navy. The man for whom the ship was named is Vice Admiral Graf v. Spee, 1861-1914. He was famous for his defeat of the British commander Admiral Craddock at the start of WWI; however, the brave seaman was defeated by Sir Frederick Studee near the Falkland Islands in December of 1914, and he went down the his ship. The incident became famous in German naval tradition. It should be noted that the hunting down of Spee’s squadron was an act of revenge by the Brits, who were embarrassed by earlier defeats by the German admiral. Six German ships including Spee’s own flagship, Scharnhorst, were sunk with 2,200 sailors drowned, among them, Admiral Spee. Interesting, but horrible, that s per usual, the British command literally watched those sailors drown. (British ferocity evidenced through the ages!).The medal is by the most famous medalist of the Imperial and N.S. period, Karl Goetz. The front has the words ‘Maximilian Graf von Spee Vizeadmiral.” The reverse has the proud German eagle standing rampant upon a sea monster (Britain) with the date ‘1914,’ and the legend says” ‘Seeschlacht bei Santa Maria 1 Nov.. At the bottom are the initials ‘KG’ for Karl Goetz. It’s oval in shape 2 1/2 x 1 3/4 inches. It has a beautiful patina and beautiful condition.

PRICE:  SOLD

 

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Patriotic Handkerchief (Item WWI 7-18; KCLOTH 1-12)

DESCRIPTION: This is a small, linen handkerchief measuring 9 x 8 inches with the German colors along the edges and the Prussian Eagle and Iron Cross as central themes. It is a very nice little souvenir of the better time. There are a few small holes here and there, but still quite nice and displayable.

PRICE: SOLD

 

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Book Unsere Marine im Weltkrieg 1914-1918 (Item WWI 7-19; KMISC 1-13; KRIEG 5-11)

DESCRIPTION: This book, Our Navy in the World War 1914-1918, was published in 1927. This is a really (huge), beautiful book of 491 pages and measures 10 1/2 x 14 inches and is 1 1/2 inches thick. It’s chock full of wonderful black and white and vibrant color illustrations. The colors are full-page dramatic illustrations and photos taken from famous naval paintings Many foldout maps of battles and strategies, destroyers, pocket battleships, U-boats, admirals, captains, crews, naval artillery, marine infantry, and the Kaiser in naval uniform grace its pages. The U-boat pictures alone are worth the price of this wonderful volume. There is a great section on early naval aviation and zeppelins. The book is in very fine condition except for the last three or four pages that are a very little bit water stained (only at the very bottom) and the last page has a slight nick at the bottom. This is a first-class history book of the glorious deeds on the high seas of war.

PRICE:  SOLD

 

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 Two Original Pictures of WWI German Pilots with their Aircraft (Item WWI 7-21; KPHOTO 2-9)

DESCRIPTION: Here are two original album-type photos of German aviators; one being presumed to be the pilot and the other a cameraman, who would take pictures of enemy maneuvers and installations. Original pictures such as this are quite rare and seldom seen, today. The larger one is 5 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches, while the other is 3 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches. Both are really in good shape and certainly important historically to anyone who is interested in aviation of the Great War.

PRICE: $160.00; the pair

 

 

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Contact Us

Please refer to item designator in parentheses in all correspondence.

Please E-mail for any additional information you may need.

If you prefer, contact 'Germania' at PO Box 68, Lakemont, GA 30552
or call at 706.782.1668.


Please! do not call during the wee hours of the morning. The best time for calling us is between 10 and 11 am and between 9 and 11 pm eastern time.