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Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

World War I

Page 13


Luftwaffe

 

 

Tea Towel

Tea Towel

 

Tea Towel

Tea Towel

Tea Towel

Tea Towel

Tea Towel

Tea Towel

Tea Towel

Tea Towel

Tea Towel

Tea Towel

Tea Towel

Tea Towel

Tea Towel

WWI German Tea Towel: “Special Militaria-Illustrated Version” (Item WWI 13-1; CLOTH 4-15)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a traditional item that soldiers would send home to family or to his beloved lady from special PX stores, usually prior to the war. It was a tea towel or some say a scarf that just had to be the busiest little gift one could imagine. It measures 24 inches square and it pictures in its center the typical German Landser (soldier) marching with his rifle and all around this are pictured the various medals and orders that would be bestowed on the valiant and brave. Then around that circle are shoulder boards of the various ranks of the German Army. Then the rest of the pictures are dozens and dozens of illustrations of weaponry nomenclature, exercise charts, martial drill procedures, targets, uniform regulations, military terrain, evaluations, tactics on the field for riflemen, and even martial music scores, among others. As we said, busy!, but unique and definitely pretty and most definitely rare; it’s also in perfect condition (no holes, no tears, no stains). Color is fast and bright. Here is a treasure indeed, it only awaits framing.

PRICE: $295.00; Rare! Rare! Rare!

 

Trench Knife

Trench Knife
Stormtrooper of the Assault Battalion Rohr

 

Trench Knife

Trench Knife

Trench Knife

Trench Knife

Trench Knife
WWI stormtroop officer

Trench Knife
Another heavily armed soldier of the assault group

German Nahkampfmesser (Trench Knife) (Item WWI 13-2; KWEP 5-14, WEHR 33-24, ANTWEP 4-8)

DESCRIPTION: The nastiest knife of the wars and in this statement I do include the equivalent pieces in the American and British models of this horrible weapon of personal murder (up close, one on one) it really takes a special persona to come up behind a sentry (a living human being) and stab him or cut his throat and this knife wielder has to be I would think without any human emotion and I would think also of animalistic intelligence at best. OK, we know that these vicious weapons were developed as stabbing devices for use in close-combat encounters with enemy personnel and in WWI they were used in trench warfare when the enemy actually leaped into the trench occupied by Allied or Axis soldiers. This was the ultimate murder fest and the revelation of horror of genocidal and fratricidal mayhem. The knife we offer is in very good condition with some old-age rust on the blade. I’m positive it would clean up well with some fine steel wool and some elbow grease. Right under the top (pommel) there is a small hole that is drilled and I think it was meant to have a personal escutcheon that the owner would have placed there since these same knives were used in WWII, also. It could have been runes that might have been present there??? The grip seems to be of Bakelite or maybe highly polished wood: what do you think? What is really rare on this knife is that the leather belt device and the leather fastener with snap grommet are both completely intact. Practically all of these we have ever seen have been broken and torn. The leather washer between the crossguard and blade is also there and intact. The scabbard is fine showing some old corrosion, but still nice. The knife in its scabbard measures about 11 ½ inches long and the blade is about 6 ½ inches long. Actually to find one of these stabenstickers in this remarkable condition is quite a rare occurrence.

PRICE: $495.00

 

Toy Soldier

Toy Soldier

 

Toy Soldier

Toy Soldier
Fritz's "wound"

Toy Soldier
German Christmas card from WWI

Toy Soldier
Fritz up a pole! Cartoon of the 1890s

Toy Soldier
Little Fritz admires his fatherland's hero

Toy Soldier
Could this be "Fritz" embracing the Fräulein?

Fritz, the Good German Soldier in Caricature--WWI (Item WWI 13-3)

DESCRIPTION: Here is Fritz, der gute deutsche Soldat (The good German soldier). In Germany, children’s books of the period 1890s through 1915, Fritz was a favorite cartoon character who exemplified the humorous side of the life of the German soldier (Soldatenleben). He was generally depicted as you see him here, but usually without the cigar. German tobacco dealers took a liking to Fritz and they featured statues such as this on the shelves that featured their tobacco product, so Fritz took up the bad habit. However, he does seem to be enjoying that cigar. He’s wearing the typical garb of the enlisted German soldier with all colors correct to the regulations, and proper cap and shoulder boards. He is 4 ½ inches high and the base is 2 ½ inches wide. He measures 3 ¼ inches across the shoulders. He dates around 1914 and for his age of 102, he is in very good shape. He must have eaten a lot of sauerkraut and washed it down with good Bavarian beer. When you view his backside there is a small hole on the left near the sleeve. Why? How? We don’t know, but thank goodness it’s on the back, because Fritz likes to be viewed from his front. There are no manufacturer’s marks. He is constructed in a white-metal European alloy. Fritz is a happy fellow, but I guess at this point he didn’t know he was about to enter the fray of the horrible genocidal war that his Fatherland was thrust into by forces of evil that sought to bring white, western culture to an end. If they failed that time, they certainly succeeded the second time around, didn’t they? But for now, let’s enjoy the moment with glücklich Fritz. I can tell he likes you, and wants to be your kleine, glücklich deutsche Soldat.

PRICE: $275.00

Iron Cross Gold Pin

Iron Cross Gold Pin

 

Iron Cross Gold Pin

Iron Cross Gold Pin
Family of the Iron Cross in WWI

Iron Cross Gold Pin
WWI Iron Cross First Class

Iron Cross Gold Pin
WWI Iron Cross Second Class

Solid Gold WWI Iron Cross Stickpin (Item WWI 13-4; KJEWELRY 3-1; KMEDAL 5-11)

DESCRIPTION: This is an elegant piece of German WWI-era jewelry, completely original and definitely period; it’s just as nice a piece of jewelry as we have ever seen in German museum collections. The pin that holds the roundel is also in 10K gold. The motif is the Iron Cross in elegant fine enamel and the crown “W” and the date “1914” are in brilliant, fine detail. All around this is a branch of laurel leaves on the right and oak leaves on the left and seen on the back is a “10K” stamp. In our estimation this is a stickpin meant for a person of noble bearing or landed gentry; anyone but the common-man’s bauble. If you are an Iron Cross enthusiast this one is for you, but also if your collection embraces the elegant and precious, you will surely treasure this one.

PRICE: $500.00; you may never see another!

 

Rare book

Rare book

Rare book
Book signed to his friend, Fletcher Hurst

Rare book
Invitation to a social evening at the von Seeckt estate

Rare book
Postcard sent to Fletcher Hurst in Paris

Generaloberst “Hans” von Seeckt: Various Ephemera (Item WWI 13-5; PERS 5-27; RAREBBOOK 2-5; WEHR 33-26)

DESCRIPTION: Johannes Friedrich “Hans” von Seeckt (April 1866-December 1936) was an important historical personage and German military officer noted for his organization of the German Army (Reichswehr) during the Weimer Republic. He was a thorough aristocrat. He joined the army in 1885 at the age of 18 and served in the elite Kaiser Alexander Guard Grenadiers and then joined the Prussian General Staff in 1897 at the outbreak of the First World War. Seeckt held the rank of colonel and served as chief of staff in the Third Army Corps. Seeckt marched with the corps in the WWI German offensive and distinguished himself in fighting near Soissons, then in March 1915, he became chief of staff to General von Mackensen of the German Eleventh Army. Seeckt fought in the Gorlice-Tarnów Offensive, where he was credited with engineering Mackensen’s breakthrough and he received the Pour le Mérite, Prussia’s highest military honor. In June 1915, Seeckt was promoted to the rank of general-major and on 1 September he became chief of staff for the Austro-Hungarian Seventh Army in Galicia.

Reichswehr

After the end of the war and the dissolution of the old Imperial Army it fell to Seeckt to organize the new Reichswehr within the strict restrictions composed by the Treaty of Versailles. He successfully laid the basis for a strong Reichswehr and disguised the new leadership effectively with the forbidden general staff, under the name the Truppenamt, or Troop Office. He is also known for this hostile attitude towards the Second Polish Republic, and he was all for seeking an alliance with the Soviet Union against Poland. After seeing encouraging signs from the newly established War Commissar’s Office of Leon Trotsky, Seeckt sent out members of a secret staff to conduct a military alliance with the Soviets, unbeknownst to the Weimar government. After the Allies sent the German government a list of “war criminals” to be tried, Seeckt called a conference of staff officers and department heads on February 9, 1920, and said to them that if the German government refused or was unable to reject the Allied demands, the Reichswehr must oppose this by all means even if this meant the reopening of hostilities! He further said that if the Allies invaded Germany—he believed they would not—then the German army in the West should retire behind the Weser and the Elbe, as this was where defensive positions had already been built. In the East, German troops would invade Poland and attempt to establish contacts with the Soviet Union, wherein they would both march against France and Britain. He added that German war material would now no longer be sold or destroyed and that the army should be refused on paper only. An interior minister of Prussia, Albert Grzesinski, wrote that members of Seeck’s staff said that Seeckt desired a military dictatorship, perhaps headed by Gustav Noske. Seeckt’s role during the Kapp Putsch of March 1920, remains uncertain; he refused to either actively put down the rebellion or cooperate with it. His remark to the leaders of the republic, that “Reichswehr do not fire on Reichswehr”, was controversial. From 1920 to 1926, Seeckt held the position of Chef der Heeresleitung—in fact if not in name, commander of the army of the new Weimar Republic Reichswehr. He was working to build a nonpolitical professional army as a state within a state. He was an admirer of the British concept of a small, highly trained, regular army within which political activity was forbidden. This matched the conditions of the Versailles Treaty which was aimed at creating a long-term, professional army with a ceiling of 100,000 volunteers and without significant reserve; a force which would not be able to challenge the much larger French Army. Seeckt was a monarchist by personal inclination who encouraged the retention of traditional links with the old Imperial Army. With this purpose he designated individual companies and squadrons of the new Reichswehr as the direct successors of particular regiments of the emperor’s army. After Seeckt had met Adolf Hitler for the first time on March 11, 1923, he wrote: “We were as one in our aim; only our paths were different.” However, he firmly resisted Hitler’s Putsch on November 8-9, 1923, insisting that the Bavarian Division of the Reichswehr remain loyal to the Republic. He strongly opposed the Locarno Treaties, which he viewed as appeasement of France and was skeptical of German membership in the League of Nations because he thought it was selling out to West Germany’s connections with Russia. Seeckt was eventually forced to resign on October 9, 1926, after permitting Prince Wilhelm, the grandson of the former emperor, to attend army maneuvers in the uniform of the old Imperial First Guards without first seeking government approval. While running the military, von Seeckt only allowed skilled men to be in the 100,000-man army. He locked them into a mandatory 12 years of confirmed military service with full board and pay, allowing for a stability that rarely existed in the midst of massive economic depression of Germany. He gained the loyalty of his men by paying them six times the amount of a French soldier. Von Seeckt made the training standards of the Reichswehr the toughest in the world. He trained them in antiair and antitank battles by creating wooden weapons and staging mock battles under the guise of training the soldiers for reintroduction into civilian life. Von Seeckt disciplined this small army much differently than past German armies. Rather than beat or shoot a soldier for infractions, von Seeckt forced minor offenders to spend off-hour duties lying under a bed and singing old Lutheran hymns. The chief also had his men taught in seemingly useless topics like horse anatomy and the art of beekeeping to allow them to be citizens with skills as well as military support crews. Later Years: From 1930 to 1932, Seeckt sat in the Reichstag as a member of the DVP, after failing to be adopted as a candidate for the Centre Party. In the presidential election of 1932, he wrote his sister, urging her to vote for Hitler. From 1934 to 1935, he served as an adviser to Chiang Kai-shek. However, on returning to Germany from China he became disillusioned with Hitler. Contained in this offering is a book by Hans von Seeckt entitled Gedanken eines Soldaten (Thoughts of a Soldier). It comprises 157 pages of text with a nice picture of the author on the first page. It’s in almost mint condition and measures 6 ¼ x 9 inches. The book is dedicated in the first inner page to Mr. John Fletcher Hurst commemorating a meeting in Berlin in 1932, and again in 1936, signed by hand in ink by von Seeckt. Also, there is an invitation for the Fletcher family to visit the von Seeckt home at 9:30 in the evening on a Tuesday in March and we assume this was the 1936 meeting when the book was presented. The formal visit was requested by both Herr and Frau von Seeckt. There is a noted music reference. There is also a postcard that pictures some eighteenth-century Chinese artifacts and it is sent with postal cancellation to Mr. J. Fletcher Hurst in Paris. Seeckt wrote in French to Hurst and thanks him for a certain souvenir and he dates it 1935 and hand signs it. Why do I spend so much time and effort to present this particular group of ephemera? Because this old and noble Prussian monarchist was the very epitome of the spirit of Frederick the Great, Blucher, Scharnhorst, et al. When one looks at him with his monocle staring back, you can almost hear the refrain of Deutschland, Deutschland über alles.

PRICE: $385.00; Price for the group

 

 

Ring

Ring

Rare book

Rare book

Rare book

Finger Ring Featuring the Kaisers Wilhelm of Prussia and Franz Joseph of Austria (Item WWI 13-6; KJEWELRY 3-2)

DESCRIPTION: This is very petite ring probably worn by a woman. It is a patriotic ring worn by persons who supported the monarchies. It’s in a 9 ½ size and the figures of the Kaisers are so small as to need magnification to see, but nonetheless, it is a rare, esoteric item for the true collector.

PRICE: $115.00

 

Ring

Ring

Ring

Ring

Silver Finger Ring (Presentation) (Item KJEWELRY 3-3; WWI 13-7)

DESCRIPTION: This ring would be given to persons who were patriotic enough to give funds to support the German Kaiser and Reich with generous donations and sometimes even their sons. This was early in the war because, later, people were asked to donate silver and gold for support for the war efforts. The ring has the words that surround it saying “Vaterlands Dank (Fatherland, Thanks). It is a very small size 6½ and in very good condition.

PRICE: $195.00

 

Ring

Ring Featuring the WWI German Wound Badge (Item WWI 13-8; KJEWELRY 3-4)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a rare finger ring that has the German Wound Badge with crossed swords as its central theme. It has “800” for silver content stamped deeply inside the shank. We have only one of these and it’s a size 8. It’s petite, but neat!

PRICE: $155.00

 

Ring

Ring

Finger Ring with Enameled Top with Iron Cross and National Colors; Size 9 (Item WWI 13-9; KJEWELRY 3-5)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a really nice WWI patriotic ring with a beautiful, little Iron Cross that is seen with the black, white, and red German national colors behind it. Flanking the sides were the words Weltkrieg (World War), but the side where “Krieg” would be has been broken, but it is still presentable and historically important and nice. It’s stamped “800” inside.

PRICE: $150.00

 

Ring

Ring

WWI Finger Ring (Item WWI 13-10; KJEWELRY 3-6)

DESCRIPTION: Here is possibly one of the most different patriotic rings that I have ever seen. It has a beautiful egg-shaped enamel stone mounted in a silver setting. The stone is colored with the German National Farbe—black, white, and red. It is extremely petite with a really dainty shank. It is in size 6½. We have only the one and it is quite rare.

PRICE: $125.00

 

Ring

Ring

WWI Gold-for-Iron Ring for War-Effort Contribution (Item WWI 13-11; KJEWELRY 3-7)

DESCRIPTION: For an explanation of the tradition behind this ring, go to Item WWI 6-12. This one we offer here is much smaller than the ones pictured there and sold, and is probably the smallest ring we have ever offered (size 4); probably for a small Fräulein. You have to use magnification to see the patriotic message, but it’s there–rather worn, but readable, at least.

PRICE: $80.00

 

Medal

Medal

Medal

Medal

Medal
Hindenburg Honor War Cross Medal

Medal
Hindenburg Honor War Cross with ribbon

Medal

War Veteran’s Cross of the Deutsche Kolonialgesellschaft (DKG) (Item WWI 13-12)

DESCRIPTION: At the end of WWI, the German government at the directive of General Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg instituted and established a medal to be given to all participants in the war. The name of this award was the Honor Cross of the World War (Das Ehrenkreuz des Weltkriegs 1914-1918). The medal was instituted on July 13, 1934, and was to commemorate the distinguished deeds of the German people in the former war. Shortly after its issuance, the NSDAP government declared the award as the only official service decoration of the First World War to be worn on any military uniform of a state and NSDAP uniforms. Now we offer here the Ehrenkreuz der Deutsche Kolonialgesellschaft (Honor Cross of the German Colonial Society). This basically was a society whose main goal was to work for a more expansive German colonial policy. From 1916, plans were made for a German Colonial Empire in Africa: Deutsche Mittelafrika was the theme. After Germany lost its colonies at the end of the First World War the Society propagated for their reoccupation. When the Nazi Party seized power in Germany the Colonial Society was dissolved and Colonial matters became the task of the Reichskolonialbund. This was the collective body that absorbed all German colonial organizations during the time of the Third Reich. This was a very much more efficient organization that the former DKG. The medal that we offer here is extremely rare. It is the Honor Cross issued by the Deutsche Kolonialgesellschaft. It is much like the Hindenburg Honor Cross in shape and dimension, but in its center is the symbol of the DKG; i.e., the palm tree with the letters “DKG.” This particular one is with swords that indicate the soldier honored was a combatant. This was the only diversion known from strict Germanic protocol. The ribbon was exactly the same as featured on the Hindenburg Cross. At the back of the award at the bottom, you can see the initials of the company that manufactured the crosses (“WDC”). It is most interesting that the middle initial “D” has a winged insect flying through it (clever). In all our years in this field, we have never seen another example of this rare medal, but we have seen an enameled stickpin with this logo on it. This is extremely rare, but reasonably priced.

PRICE: $425.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Contact Us

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If you prefer, contact 'Germania' at PO Box 68, Lakemont, GA 30552
or call at 706.782.1668.


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