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Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

World War I

Page 13


Luftwaffe

 

 

 

Trench Knife

Trench Knife
Stormtrooper of the Assault Battalion Rohr

 

Trench Knife

Trench Knife

Trench Knife

Trench Knife

Trench Knife
WWI stormtroop officer

Trench Knife
Another heavily armed soldier of the assault group

German Nahkampfmesser (Trench Knife) (Item WWI 13-2; KWEP 5-14, WEHR 33-24, ANTWEP 4-8)

DESCRIPTION: The nastiest knife of the wars and in this statement I do include the equivalent pieces in the American and British models of this horrible weapon of personal murder (up close, one on one) it really takes a special persona to come up behind a sentry (a living human being) and stab him or cut his throat and this knife wielder has to be I would think without any human emotion and I would think also of animalistic intelligence at best. OK, we know that these vicious weapons were developed as stabbing devices for use in close-combat encounters with enemy personnel and in WWI they were used in trench warfare when the enemy actually leaped into the trench occupied by Allied or Axis soldiers. This was the ultimate murder fest and the revelation of horror of genocidal and fratricidal mayhem. The knife we offer is in very good condition with some old-age rust on the blade. I’m positive it would clean up well with some fine steel wool and some elbow grease. Right under the top (pommel) there is a small hole that is drilled and I think it was meant to have a personal escutcheon that the owner would have placed there since these same knives were used in WWII, also. It could have been runes that might have been present there??? The grip seems to be of Bakelite or maybe highly polished wood: what do you think? What is really rare on this knife is that the leather belt device and the leather fastener with snap grommet are both completely intact. Practically all of these we have ever seen have been broken and torn. The leather washer between the crossguard and blade is also there and intact. The scabbard is fine showing some old corrosion, but still nice. The knife in its scabbard measures about 11 ½ inches long and the blade is about 6 ½ inches long. Actually to find one of these stabenstickers in this remarkable condition is quite a rare occurrence.

PRICE: $495.00

 

Toy Soldier

Toy Soldier

 

Toy Soldier

Toy Soldier
Fritz's "wound"

Toy Soldier
German Christmas card from WWI

Toy Soldier
Fritz up a pole! Cartoon of the 1890s

Toy Soldier
Little Fritz admires his fatherland's hero

Toy Soldier
Could this be "Fritz" embracing the Fräulein?

Fritz, the Good German Soldier in Caricature--WWI (Item WWI 13-3)

DESCRIPTION: Here is Fritz, der gute deutsche Soldat (The good German soldier). In Germany, children’s books of the period 1890s through 1915, Fritz was a favorite cartoon character who exemplified the humorous side of the life of the German soldier (Soldatenleben). He was generally depicted as you see him here, but usually without the cigar. German tobacco dealers took a liking to Fritz and they featured statues such as this on the shelves that featured their tobacco product, so Fritz took up the bad habit. However, he does seem to be enjoying that cigar. He’s wearing the typical garb of the enlisted German soldier with all colors correct to the regulations, and proper cap and shoulder boards. He is 4 ½ inches high and the base is 2 ½ inches wide. He measures 3 ¼ inches across the shoulders. He dates around 1914 and for his age of 102, he is in very good shape. He must have eaten a lot of sauerkraut and washed it down with good Bavarian beer. When you view his backside there is a small hole on the left near the sleeve. Why? How? We don’t know, but thank goodness it’s on the back, because Fritz likes to be viewed from his front. There are no manufacturer’s marks. He is constructed in a white-metal European alloy. Fritz is a happy fellow, but I guess at this point he didn’t know he was about to enter the fray of the horrible genocidal war that his Fatherland was thrust into by forces of evil that sought to bring white, western culture to an end. If they failed that time, they certainly succeeded the second time around, didn’t they? But for now, let’s enjoy the moment with glücklich Fritz. I can tell he likes you, and wants to be your kleine, glücklich deutsche Soldat.

PRICE: SOLD

Iron Cross Gold Pin

Iron Cross Gold Pin

 

Iron Cross Gold Pin

Iron Cross Gold Pin
Family of the Iron Cross in WWI

Iron Cross Gold Pin
WWI Iron Cross First Class

Iron Cross Gold Pin
WWI Iron Cross Second Class

Solid Gold WWI Iron Cross Stickpin (Item WWI 13-4; KJEWELRY 3-1; KMEDAL 5-11)

DESCRIPTION: This is an elegant piece of German WWI-era jewelry, completely original and definitely period; it’s just as nice a piece of jewelry as we have ever seen in German museum collections. The pin that holds the roundel is also in 10K gold. The motif is the Iron Cross in elegant fine enamel and the crown “W” and the date “1914” are in brilliant, fine detail. All around this is a branch of laurel leaves on the right and oak leaves on the left and seen on the back is a “10K” stamp. In our estimation this is a stickpin meant for a person of noble bearing or landed gentry; anyone but the common-man’s bauble. If you are an Iron Cross enthusiast this one is for you, but also if your collection embraces the elegant and precious, you will surely treasure this one.

PRICE: $500.00; you may never see another!

 

Rare book

Rare book

Rare book
Book signed to his friend, Fletcher Hurst

Rare book
Invitation to a social evening at the von Seeckt estate

Rare book
Postcard sent to Fletcher Hurst in Paris

Generaloberst “Hans” von Seeckt: Various Ephemera (Item WWI 13-5; PERS 5-27; RAREBBOOK 2-5; WEHR 33-26)

DESCRIPTION: Johannes Friedrich “Hans” von Seeckt (April 1866-December 1936) was an important historical personage and German military officer noted for his organization of the German Army (Reichswehr) during the Weimer Republic. He was a thorough aristocrat. He joined the army in 1885 at the age of 18 and served in the elite Kaiser Alexander Guard Grenadiers and then joined the Prussian General Staff in 1897 at the outbreak of the First World War. Seeckt held the rank of colonel and served as chief of staff in the Third Army Corps. Seeckt marched with the corps in the WWI German offensive and distinguished himself in fighting near Soissons, then in March 1915, he became chief of staff to General von Mackensen of the German Eleventh Army. Seeckt fought in the Gorlice-Tarnów Offensive, where he was credited with engineering Mackensen’s breakthrough and he received the Pour le Mérite, Prussia’s highest military honor. In June 1915, Seeckt was promoted to the rank of general-major and on 1 September he became chief of staff for the Austro-Hungarian Seventh Army in Galicia.

Reichswehr

After the end of the war and the dissolution of the old Imperial Army it fell to Seeckt to organize the new Reichswehr within the strict restrictions composed by the Treaty of Versailles. He successfully laid the basis for a strong Reichswehr and disguised the new leadership effectively with the forbidden general staff, under the name the Truppenamt, or Troop Office. He is also known for this hostile attitude towards the Second Polish Republic, and he was all for seeking an alliance with the Soviet Union against Poland. After seeing encouraging signs from the newly established War Commissar’s Office of Leon Trotsky, Seeckt sent out members of a secret staff to conduct a military alliance with the Soviets, unbeknownst to the Weimar government. After the Allies sent the German government a list of “war criminals” to be tried, Seeckt called a conference of staff officers and department heads on February 9, 1920, and said to them that if the German government refused or was unable to reject the Allied demands, the Reichswehr must oppose this by all means even if this meant the reopening of hostilities! He further said that if the Allies invaded Germany—he believed they would not—then the German army in the West should retire behind the Weser and the Elbe, as this was where defensive positions had already been built. In the East, German troops would invade Poland and attempt to establish contacts with the Soviet Union, wherein they would both march against France and Britain. He added that German war material would now no longer be sold or destroyed and that the army should be refused on paper only. An interior minister of Prussia, Albert Grzesinski, wrote that members of Seeck’s staff said that Seeckt desired a military dictatorship, perhaps headed by Gustav Noske. Seeckt’s role during the Kapp Putsch of March 1920, remains uncertain; he refused to either actively put down the rebellion or cooperate with it. His remark to the leaders of the republic, that “Reichswehr do not fire on Reichswehr”, was controversial. From 1920 to 1926, Seeckt held the position of Chef der Heeresleitung—in fact if not in name, commander of the army of the new Weimar Republic Reichswehr. He was working to build a nonpolitical professional army as a state within a state. He was an admirer of the British concept of a small, highly trained, regular army within which political activity was forbidden. This matched the conditions of the Versailles Treaty which was aimed at creating a long-term, professional army with a ceiling of 100,000 volunteers and without significant reserve; a force which would not be able to challenge the much larger French Army. Seeckt was a monarchist by personal inclination who encouraged the retention of traditional links with the old Imperial Army. With this purpose he designated individual companies and squadrons of the new Reichswehr as the direct successors of particular regiments of the emperor’s army. After Seeckt had met Adolf Hitler for the first time on March 11, 1923, he wrote: “We were as one in our aim; only our paths were different.” However, he firmly resisted Hitler’s Putsch on November 8-9, 1923, insisting that the Bavarian Division of the Reichswehr remain loyal to the Republic. He strongly opposed the Locarno Treaties, which he viewed as appeasement of France and was skeptical of German membership in the League of Nations because he thought it was selling out to West Germany’s connections with Russia. Seeckt was eventually forced to resign on October 9, 1926, after permitting Prince Wilhelm, the grandson of the former emperor, to attend army maneuvers in the uniform of the old Imperial First Guards without first seeking government approval. While running the military, von Seeckt only allowed skilled men to be in the 100,000-man army. He locked them into a mandatory 12 years of confirmed military service with full board and pay, allowing for a stability that rarely existed in the midst of massive economic depression of Germany. He gained the loyalty of his men by paying them six times the amount of a French soldier. Von Seeckt made the training standards of the Reichswehr the toughest in the world. He trained them in antiair and antitank battles by creating wooden weapons and staging mock battles under the guise of training the soldiers for reintroduction into civilian life. Von Seeckt disciplined this small army much differently than past German armies. Rather than beat or shoot a soldier for infractions, von Seeckt forced minor offenders to spend off-hour duties lying under a bed and singing old Lutheran hymns. The chief also had his men taught in seemingly useless topics like horse anatomy and the art of beekeeping to allow them to be citizens with skills as well as military support crews. Later Years: From 1930 to 1932, Seeckt sat in the Reichstag as a member of the DVP, after failing to be adopted as a candidate for the Centre Party. In the presidential election of 1932, he wrote his sister, urging her to vote for Hitler. From 1934 to 1935, he served as an adviser to Chiang Kai-shek. However, on returning to Germany from China he became disillusioned with Hitler. Contained in this offering is a book by Hans von Seeckt entitled Gedanken eines Soldaten (Thoughts of a Soldier). It comprises 157 pages of text with a nice picture of the author on the first page. It’s in almost mint condition and measures 6 ¼ x 9 inches. The book is dedicated in the first inner page to Mr. John Fletcher Hurst commemorating a meeting in Berlin in 1932, and again in 1936, signed by hand in ink by von Seeckt. Also, there is an invitation for the Fletcher family to visit the von Seeckt home at 9:30 in the evening on a Tuesday in March and we assume this was the 1936 meeting when the book was presented. The formal visit was requested by both Herr and Frau von Seeckt. There is a noted music reference. There is also a postcard that pictures some eighteenth-century Chinese artifacts and it is sent with postal cancellation to Mr. J. Fletcher Hurst in Paris. Seeckt wrote in French to Hurst and thanks him for a certain souvenir and he dates it 1935 and hand signs it. Why do I spend so much time and effort to present this particular group of ephemera? Because this old and noble Prussian monarchist was the very epitome of the spirit of Frederick the Great, Blucher, Scharnhorst, et al. When one looks at him with his monocle staring back, you can almost hear the refrain of Deutschland, Deutschland über alles.

PRICE: $385.00; Price for the group

 

 

Ring

Ring

Rare book

Rare book

Rare book

Finger Ring Featuring the Kaisers Wilhelm of Prussia and Franz Joseph of Austria (Item WWI 13-6; KJEWELRY 3-2)

DESCRIPTION: This is very petite ring probably worn by a woman. It is a patriotic ring worn by persons who supported the monarchies. It’s in a 9 ½ size and the figures of the Kaisers are so small as to need magnification to see, but nonetheless, it is a rare, esoteric item for the true collector.

PRICE: $115.00

 

Ring

Ring

Ring

Ring

Silver Finger Ring (Presentation) (Item KJEWELRY 3-3; WWI 13-7)

DESCRIPTION: This ring would be given to persons who were patriotic enough to give funds to support the German Kaiser and Reich with generous donations and sometimes even their sons. This was early in the war because, later, people were asked to donate silver and gold for support for the war efforts. The ring has the words that surround it saying “Vaterlands Dank (Fatherland, Thanks). It is a very small size 6½ and in very good condition.

PRICE: $195.00

 

Ring

Ring Featuring the WWI German Wound Badge (Item WWI 13-8; KJEWELRY 3-4)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a rare finger ring that has the German Wound Badge with crossed swords as its central theme. It has “800” for silver content stamped deeply inside the shank. We have only one of these and it’s a size 8. It’s petite, but neat!

PRICE: $155.00

 

Ring

Ring

Finger Ring with Enameled Top with Iron Cross and National Colors; Size 9 (Item WWI 13-9; KJEWELRY 3-5)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a really nice WWI patriotic ring with a beautiful, little Iron Cross that is seen with the black, white, and red German national colors behind it. Flanking the sides were the words Weltkrieg (World War), but the side where “Krieg” would be has been broken, but it is still presentable and historically important and nice. It’s stamped “800” inside.

PRICE: SOLD

 

Ring

Ring

WWI Finger Ring (Item WWI 13-10; KJEWELRY 3-6)

DESCRIPTION: Here is possibly one of the most different patriotic rings that I have ever seen. It has a beautiful egg-shaped enamel stone mounted in a silver setting. The stone is colored with the German National Farbe—black, white, and red. It is extremely petite with a really dainty shank. It is in size 6½. We have only the one and it is quite rare.

PRICE: $125.00

 

Ring

Ring

WWI Gold-for-Iron Ring for War-Effort Contribution (Item WWI 13-11; KJEWELRY 3-7)

DESCRIPTION: For an explanation of the tradition behind this ring, go to Item WWI 6-12. This one we offer here is much smaller than the ones pictured there and sold, and is probably the smallest ring we have ever offered (size 4); probably for a small Fräulein. You have to use magnification to see the patriotic message, but it’s there–rather worn, but readable, at least.

PRICE: $150.00

 

Medal

Medal

Medal

Medal

Medal
Hindenburg Honor War Cross Medal

Medal
Hindenburg Honor War Cross with ribbon

Medal

War Veteran’s Cross of the Deutsche Kolonialgesellschaft (DKG) (Item WWI 13-12)

DESCRIPTION: At the end of WWI, the German government at the directive of General Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg instituted and established a medal to be given to all participants in the war. The name of this award was the Honor Cross of the World War (Das Ehrenkreuz des Weltkriegs 1914-1918). The medal was instituted on July 13, 1934, and was to commemorate the distinguished deeds of the German people in the former war. Shortly after its issuance, the NSDAP government declared the award as the only official service decoration of the First World War to be worn on any military uniform of a state and NSDAP uniforms. Now we offer here the Ehrenkreuz der Deutsche Kolonialgesellschaft (Honor Cross of the German Colonial Society). This basically was a society whose main goal was to work for a more expansive German colonial policy. From 1916, plans were made for a German Colonial Empire in Africa: Deutsche Mittelafrika was the theme. After Germany lost its colonies at the end of the First World War the Society propagated for their reoccupation. When the Nazi Party seized power in Germany the Colonial Society was dissolved and Colonial matters became the task of the Reichskolonialbund. This was the collective body that absorbed all German colonial organizations during the time of the Third Reich. This was a very much more efficient organization that the former DKG. The medal that we offer here is extremely rare. It is the Honor Cross issued by the Deutsche Kolonialgesellschaft. It is much like the Hindenburg Honor Cross in shape and dimension, but in its center is the symbol of the DKG; i.e., the palm tree with the letters “DKG.” This particular one is with swords that indicate the soldier honored was a combatant. This was the only diversion known from strict Germanic protocol. The ribbon was exactly the same as featured on the Hindenburg Cross. At the back of the award at the bottom, you can see the initials of the company that manufactured the crosses (“WDC”). It is most interesting that the middle initial “D” has a winged insect flying through it (clever). In all our years in this field, we have never seen another example of this rare medal, but we have seen an enameled stickpin with this logo on it. This is extremely rare, but reasonably priced.

PRICE: $425.00

 

Cigar Box

Cigar Box

Cigar Box

Cigar Box

Cigar Box

German World War One Cigar Box (Item WWI 13-13)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a lovely cigar box that is labeled on its top “Das Eiserne Kreuz 1914”—“The Iron Cross 1914.” The box measures 8½ x 7 inches and is 1¼ inches deep. Above the words on the lid is a small picture of the Iron Cross. When opened there is a large Iron Cross of 1914 with ribbon and beautiful gold, oak-leaf clusters on the underside of the lid. The box we would say is in remarkable shape except for some of the paper covering is nicked and torn here and there, but as can be seen in the images, this item, though more than a hundred years old, has for the most part stood the test of time. Yes, he is fragile and he asks some genuine Germanophile, who is a collector, to give him a respectable place to rest while reflecting for better or worse the history of that “Great War” to end all wars!

PRICE: $175.00

 

Shoe

Shoe

Shoe

Shoe

Shoe

Shoe

Shoe

Shoe

Shoe
An 18th-century pair in a museum

Shoe

Shoe
Wooden shoes are still made today.

WWI Wooden Shoe—1914-1915 (Item WWI 13-14)

DESCRIPTION: Im Sommer, Kühl; Im Winter, Warm.“ When most think about wooden shoes they think Dutch/Holland, but they don’t usually realize that in Germany in the Westphalia area the people there have worn wooden shoes for centuries. There are ancient folk tales in Westphalia of the witch who trampled the devil and thwarted Hell with her feet firmly encased in huge wooden shoes. We can find surnames in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries formed from the occupation of wooden-shoemaker people with the surnames Holzehuber and Holzemacher. They were no doubt skilled craftsmen at one time making custom-fitted and durable wooden footwear at just the right price for the area farmers. The shoe we offer comes from that Westphalia area and is a souvenir of the First World War. The maker of the shoe has carved an Imperial German eagle that is seen above two crossed German flags and above this are the words “Welt” and “Krieg.” Under this are the dates “1914” and “1915,” for the years that the former owner served his fatherland. The rim of the shoe is decorated in typical checkered pattern. This is a full-sized wooden shoe, not a miniature. Part of the word “Krieg” is rather worn and light, but still can be seen. Someone over the years has added a short bar device to the back heel of the shoe so it can be hung on the wall for display. This is obviously a very different war trophy. I have never owned one before in all the years in this business. This is an unusual souvenir piece of the Great War.

PRICE: $750.00

 

Naval Dirk

Naval Dirk

Naval Dirk

Naval Dirk

Naval Dirk
Obverse side

Naval Dirk
Reverse side with lock button

Naval Dirk

Naval Dirk

Naval Dirk
Note the beautiful pebbling

Naval Dirk
Gorgeous bone graining

Naval Dirk

Naval Dirk
Company logo

Naval Dirk

Naval Dirk

Naval Dirk

Naval Dirk

Naval Dirk

Naval Dirk
A similar dagger

Naval Dirk
This one is very similar to the one we offer.

Naval Dirk
German naval officers with dirks, including Prince Adalbert (front row left)

Naval Dirk
A naval officer wearing his Imperial dagger

Naval Dirk
Kaiser Wilhelm wearing the naval dirk

Naval Dirk

Naval Dirk
This is a similar dagger seen in Wittmann and Johnson's Collecting the Edged Weapons of Imperial Germany

Naval Dirk
Here is the famed dagger of Prince Adalbert of Prussia that was sold by Germania International

Imperial Model 1902 Naval Dirk by Eickhorn (Item WWI 13-15; KRIEG 10-24; KWEP 5-15)

DESCRIPTION: Here is one of the finest 1902 model naval dirks we have ever seen. The pommel is with the see-through Imperial Prussian Crown of Karl der Grosse (Charlemagne; Charles the Great). The dome-shaped eight sections, which run around the perimeter of the crown pommel, feature alternating crosses and Prussian eagles. Usually on these daggers, the cross at the top of the crown would be squared to prevent damage to the uniform when being worn. However, Eickhorn examples are often found, like this one, bearing the full-shaped cross. The panels that we mentioned each have a border of beads. The crossguard is of the fine Imperial types having raised fouled anchors in the center blocks. The quillion arms come outward from the center block and they end in stylized capstans. The bone grip is quite beautiful having a golden tone throughout and there is some nice-looking, surface age cracking that runs down the edges of both sides. There are no chips however, and the grain of the bone is gorgeous. This beautiful grip is wrapped with twisted, silver wire. The scabbard is great looking, too, being the rare pebbled type with no dings or dents (unusual in naval daggers). The bands that hold the rings depict typical naval ropes. The pebbled scabbards like this one seldom show up . . . and here is a perfect one. The blade is total perfection (mint) and has the wonderful sea-motif etching. The obverse side has the beautiful floral designs with a fouled anchor under the Prussian crown and below this is a sailing frigate and on the reverse side a different eighteenth-century sailing ship and more sea fauna décor. Here also is the Carl Eickhorn logo with the two squirrels seated back to back. The blade is bright and a pleasure to behold. The button that is pressed on the crossguard that holds the blade intact as it is withdrawn is nice and tight. With the scabbard total measurement is 15 ½ inches and the blade is measures 9 ¾ inches. All in all, here is an excellent opportunity to acquire an absolutely beautiful relic of the Imperial Navy. The rapidly disappearing type of naval dirk as this one is has all the extras; they just don’t come finer; an absolute gem!

PRICE: SOLD

 

Ashtray

Ashtray

Risqué Bronze Ashtray (Item WWI 13-16; KSTATUE 5-20)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a humorous little ashtray as sold in German army PXs during the WWI era. It depicts a German Lanser accompanied by a blushing young maiden. The reason for her blushing is seen when you turn the ashtray over and see where the soldier’s hand is being placed. These were commonly sent home to a man’s friends or brothers as a little humor from the Front that soon after would be no joking matter. Size is about 4½ x 3½ inches and is cast in genuine bronze. Some have been seen over the years cast in spelt. This one is unusual presented in bronze.

PRICE: $100.00

 

Belt

Belt

Belt

Belt

Belt
Modern version of old belt

Belt

Belt

Early Scottish Officer’s Garrison Belt with Empire Crest (Item WWI 13-17; ENGLAND 5-2)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a very nice Scottish military-issue belt with buckle adjusted to a 38 waist size (It has easy adjustments for making it smaller, or probably larger, too.). The crest of the British Empire is highly detailed. The belt needs a leather softener applied as the part of the leather that attaches to the buckle has gone a little stiff in many years of storage. The buckle is quite nice with the English Imperial crest attached separately to the face of the all-pure brass buckler. The buckle is large 3 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches and it shows some light, completely cleanable green verdigris here and there. There is a long issue number stamped on the back. The leather belt is in excellent condition except for being a little stiff. It’s very much readily wearable!

PRICE: $185.00

 

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

World War I German Butcher Knife/Bayonet with Serrated (Sawtooth) Edge for the Mauser 98 Rifle (Item WWI 13-18)

DESCRIPTION: German troops carried this very fine example of a saw-teeth bayonet and used it mainly for cutting down pole work that held barbed wire in position. However, it was also, after all, a bayonet and used in trench warfare. Later it was made illegal in the warfare conventions. The serrated/sawtoothed edges would not allow a wound to coagulate. This is a big weapon measuring a little over 20 inches when in its scabbard. The blade measures 14 inches. The grips are of wood and the maker is H. Mundlos & Co. in Magdeburg. The bayonet also includes the leather frog. A former collector attached a band just below the frog that says “GEW.98 ser. No. 2727.” This band is removable, of course. The entire piece is in great condition for its very advanced age. The blade has some cleanable minute rust spots.

PRICE: $750.00

 

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Commemorative War Plate (Item WWI 13-19; RED CROSS 1-27; KGLASS 3-20)

DESCRIPTION: This is a beautiful collector’s plate by the famed porcelain firm Rosenthal in Selb, Bavaria. It commemorates the Red Cross’ participation in WWI by Germany and Austria. The main message printed upon it is “Zur Erinnerung an grosse Zeit 1915.” This translates to “In Memory of the Great Era 1915.” The illustration on the obverse of the plate is noted to be from Prof. L. v. Zumbrusch. The shields that the child bears are the heraldic arms of Germany on the left and Imperial Austria on the right. The flag behind the little lad bears the international insignia of the Red Cross, and on the back it refers to the Prussian Roten Kreuz (Red Cross) and across from this is mentioned the Patriotic Women’s Organization of Austria. Across the reverse is a patriotic quote by Ludwig Fulda. The condition of the plate is perfect and it measures 8½ inches in diameter. It has an unusual fine, brownish-hue finish. We believe it to be a New Year’s commemorative plate given as thankful gifts to Red Cross personnel who had served at the Front. The infant figure probably represents the New War Year of 1915 coming in with a spirit of hopefulness for victory and peace resulting from the Great War.

PRICE: $190.00

 

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon
German soldiers wearing different style fighting knives

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon
Double squirrel; early Eickhorn logo

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon
Note the different style trench knife; fighting knife

Bladed Weapon
German soldier wears a fighting knife

German WWI Fighting Knife by C. Eickhorn (Item WWI 13-20; KWEP 5-19)

DESCRIPTION: In the bloody world of knives made for close combat, Carl Eickhorn produced one of the rarest of them. This vicious instrument of mayhem measures 10½ inches long when in its scabbard. The blade length is 5¼ inches. It has the typical killing blade: This is a single-blade nomenclature along the top cutting edge and about one inch of double edge at its impact point. The bottom edge is sharp all the way to the end. Only Eickhorn made this model and it stands out not only because of its black composition grips, but for the highly distinctive pommel that resembles a bird’s head. The pommel contains the false bayonet button that forms the bird’s eye. This characteristic was seen later on police daggers produced by Eickhorn and other Solingen firms. Even though the police bayonets were sometimes slotted to mount on a K98 rifle, 95 percent of them were unslotted. In the meantime, this is a rare Eickhorn knife. The strap and snap button are intact as is the scabbard loop that secures it to the body.

PRICE: $450.00

 

 

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

Bladed Weapon

German WWI Fighting Knife by C. Eickhorn (Item WWI 13-20a; KWEP 5-20)

DESCRIPTION: Here is another fighting knife obviously by Eickhorn similar to the one above. This one, however, is not company marked so the probability is that Eickhorn produced it for some other company who retailed it. The blade on this one is just short of six inches long. It also has the Eickhorn black composition grips. The blade is shaped in the same murderous description as the other one, but this one does not have the false pommel button (bayonet style). The stamp and snap arrangement are intact although much used, but not abused.

PRICE: $400.00

 

Bayonet

Bayonet

Bayonet

Bayonet

Bayonet

Bayonet

Bayonet

Bayonet

Bayonet

Bayonet

Bayonet

Bayonet

 German WWI Crank Handle Bayonet (Item WWI 13-21; KWEP 5-18)

DESCRIPTION:  This is a rare and genuine early example of the famous ersatz crank handle bayonet. This is one of the few ersatz bayonets for which a maker is attributable: “DEMAG” (Deutsche Maschinenbau-Aktiengesellschaft) in Duisburg, Germany. It produced these bayonets between 1914 and 1918. The maker’s mark is stamped on every blade. It has a 148-mm double-edged blade that is in good condition. These bayonets were designed to fit the G98 rifle and sometimes had a modified crossguard to fit on the export pattern Mauser 98 rifle. The hole in the crossguard is to allow a clearance for the rifle’s cleaning rod to slip into. These fighting knife/bayonet combinations were at the beginning of WWI. Fakes abound, but this one is 100-percent genuine and guaranteed! Quite rare in the fact that the leather hanger is intact and the snap button actually works fine.

PRICE: SOLD

 

Goblet

Goblet

Goblet

Goblet

Goblet

Goblet

Goblet

Goblet

Goblet

Goblet

Goblet

Goblet

Goblet

Goblet
Oswald Boelcke

Goblet
Manfred von Richthofen

Goblet
Hermann Göring

Goblet
Ernst Udet

Goblet
Max Immelmann

Goblet
Bruno Loerzer

Goblet
Theodor Osterkamp

Goblet
The “Red Baron” Manfred von Richthofen

Honor Goblet for the German Victor in a WWI Dogfight (Item WWI 13-22; POKALS 1-8; LUFT 23-1a)

DESCRIPTION: We proudly present the Ehrenbecher für den Sieger im Luftkampfe (Honor Goblet for the Victor in Aerial Combat). This award of Imperial Germany was generally given upon one's “first kill” in aerial combat (though the actual presentation of the award might come much later). Although aviation historian, the late Neal O'Connor was unable to confirm it, the requirement for aerial victories may have increased later in the war, since air combat became more common. The total number of awards presented is unknown, but it was much fewer than its World War Two successor.

Among notable recipients of this aviation award were:

Oswald Boelcke – 24 December 1915; One of Germany's top aces of World War I; also received the Pour le Mérite.

Otto Deßloch – award date unknown; later a Colonel General in the Luftwaffe; he also received the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves.

Hermann Göring – 15 April 1916; later Reichsmarschall; received the Pour le Mérite, Baden's Military Karl-Friedrich Merit Order, and numerous other decorations.

Georg Ritter von Hengl – 17 July 1918; knighted with the Bavarian Military Order of Max Joseph in October 1918; later became General of Mountain Troops and commanded the 2nd Mountain Division and XIX Mountain Corps.

Max Immelmann – 24 December 1915; German World War I ace whose early exploits and fame led to the nickname for the Pour le Mérite as the "Blue Max"; also received the Knight's Cross and Commander's Cross of Saxony's Military Order of St. Henry.

Bruno Loerzer – award date unknown; the eighth-ranking German ace of World War I; also received the Pour le Mérite; later a Colonel General in the Luftwaffe.

Theo Osterkamp – 18 April 1917; naval aviator and Pour le Mérite recipient; also flew in World War II and rose to Lieutenant General in the Luftwaffe.

Manfred von Richthofen – award date unknown; top ace of World War I; also received the Pour le Mérite, Saxony's Military Order of St. Henry, Württemberg's Military Merit Order, and numerous other decorations.

Kurt Student – award date unknown; later a Colonel General in the Luftwaffe and commander of German airborne troops.

Ernst Udet – 17 August 1916; second-highest-scoring German ace of World War I; also received the Pour le Mérite; later a Colonel General in the Luftwaffe.

The goblet we offer is the later version produced in alpaca (silver-plated steel) with the stamped seal on the underside of the “Chef der Feldflugwesens.” It is in extremely fine condition and has a great-looking antique patina: no dents, no scratches. This is a prime, excellent example of a most desirable relic of the Great War that was established as an award in 1915. These WWI pokals, when rarely found, are many times rarer than the WWII Luftwaffe version. The goblet measures 7 3/4 inches tall by 3 3/4 inches in diameter. The fighting eagles on the front are in fantastic detail as is the wording around the base: “Dem Sieger im Luftkampf.” So, here is a wonderful, 100-year-old beautiful and very historically important relic honoring the dashing young heroes who bravely flew and fought for Kaiser and fatherland.
„Fliegen und Siegen für Vaterland!“

PRICE: $8,900.00

 

Trench Art

Trench Art

Trench Art

Trench Art

Trench Art

Trench Art

Trench Art Crucifix Employing Rifle Cartridges from WWI (Item WWI 13-23)

DESCRIPTION: This is a great piece of trench art from the terrible battles around Reims, France, during WWI. It commemorates the Reims Cathedral known as the Notre-Dame de Reims. Close to the eve of WWI, the Germans severely bombarded this magnificent edifice. The bombardment was not intended or planned; it was just an unfortunate casualty in a war that should not have ever started in the first place. The fighting was most intense in the Reims area. War is hell!, but fratricidal war is sheer hell! . There should never be another “brothers” war. This little hand-made souvenir was made from actual rifle cartridges and carried by some French poilu, who probably cherished it through the French participation in the terrible conflict that followed. Above the corpus depicted on the cross that is comprised of is a beautiful picture of the cathedral of Reims before its destruction. The name of the famed edifice is spelled out and pictured. The entire cross is built with two rifle cartridges and two bullets. This is a true and genuine war memento from the trenches.

PRICE: $350.00

 

Cigatette Case

Cigatette Case
Have a smoke, mate!

Cigatette Case

Cigatette Case

Cigatette Case

Cigatette Case

Cigatette Case

Cigatette Case

Multiple Signatures on Fine-silver Cigarette Case that Belonged to a Commanding German Officer in WWI (Item WWI 13-24; KJEWELRY 3-11)

DESCRIPTION: Here is an historical treasure; a cigarette case of fine silver that has the facsimile signatures of the fellow officers who were serving with the recipient at Dions, France, in 1917. Inside there is a tiny “800” stamping. On the reverse of the case are dozens of signatures and when opened there are about 10 more inside. The case measures 3 x 4 inches and is in extra-fine condition. On the obverse is the inscription “2. INF DIONS. KOMMANDO WELTKRIEG 1917.” Dions is a small resort town in southern France. The Second Infantry Division presumably had a command center there. A headquarters there would have been far enough away from the central mayhem of fighting to make war plans and maneuvers in 1917. The case is in remarkably excellent condition and the lid lock snaps quite tightly.

PRICE: $485.00

 

Pilot Badge

 

Pilot Badge

Pilot Badge

Pilot Badge

Pilot Badge

Pilot Badge
Ten Mauser C96 “Broomhandle” pistols arranged to defend an Austro-Hungarian reconnaissance aircraft, 1917

Badge Commemorating Pilots of the Austro-Hungarian Air Force (K.u.K. Luftfahrtruppen) (Item WWI 13-25; HUNG 2-5)

DESCRIPTION: This is a badge of the combined Austro-Hungarian military. This particular group was in support of other military branches. This more-or-less experimental status actually remained during the entire WWI, but did not lend to the creation of a new branch or an independent “air force.” The rarely found badges are usually constructed in bronze, but on really rare occasions one turns up in genuine “800” silver and it is this type we offer here. It measures 2 1/2 inches high by a little more than 2 1/4 inches wide with slight wear consistent with age. Overall, it’s in excellent condition with all wording very clear. The shield, crests, and crowns of Austria and Hungary appear clearly at the bottom. This is one of the most beautiful badges of the Great War.

PRICE: $950.00; but on sale this week for $750.00

 

Medallion

 

Medallion

Medallion

Medallion

WWI Medallion with Portraits of Two WWI Emperors (Item WWI 13-26; WILHELM 9-28)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a very handsome medallion with the side profiles of emporers Wilhelm II of Prussia and Franz Josef of Austria. Kaiser Wilhelm is wearing the eagle-top helmet of his Gardes du Corps. The medallion must have once been attached to a chest or box of some type as it seems to be produced in spelter or zinc. It measures about 3 inches in diameter and the detail shown on the two imperial greats is in true medalist art worthy of display in the finest collection of imperial remembrances.

PRICE: $95.00

 

Fliers

Fliers

Fliers

Fliers
Oswald Boelcke

Fliers
Boelcke silhouette

Fliers
Max Immelmann

Fliers
Immelmann and "copilot"

Fliers

Fliers
Von Richthofen and von Althaus

Fliers
Other famed German war fliers

Booklet Heldenflieger--WWI Air Heroes of Flight (Item WWI 13-27)

DESCRIPTION: This is a softcover booklet of 35 pages chronicling the most-noted pilots of Germany’s World War One air corps and their lives, careers, and war sagas. Brave stalwarts such as Immelmann, Richthofen, and Oswald Boelcke are pictured and praised along with other eagles of the aerial war. The book is in great condition even though more than a 100 years old. Someone penned “1918” inside the opening page. The cover has a really nice picture of a young airman who wears the Pour le Mérite (Blue Max). The book measures 10x7 inches and would be a great-looking addition to a collection of WWI air combat medals.

PRICE: $114.50

 

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Contact Us

Please refer to item designator in parentheses in all correspondence.

Please E-mail for any additional information you may need.

If you prefer, contact 'Germania' at PO Box 68, Lakemont, GA 30552
or call at 706.782.1668.


Please! do not call during the wee hours of the morning. The best time for calling us is between 10am and 12 noon and between 9 and 11 pm eastern time.