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Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Sturmabteilungen

The SA

Page 6

 

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SA Paper Figures (Item SA 6-1)

DESCRIPTION: Here are two paper cutout sheets that were given out to customers of a department store called Wadehaus in the old city Nuremberg. One would paste these cutouts on cardboard and then cut them out with scissors and stand them up. Evidently Wadehaus was a loyal NSDAP-supporting business. The other side exclaims “Heil Hitler-German youth, German adults shop with German businesses!”

PRICE: $49.00

 

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SA Glockenspiel (Item SA 6-2)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a musical instrument from a Munich Storm Troop band known as a glockenspiel, similar to a xylophone. However, the xylophone has wooden tune keys while the glockenspiel has metal and in the case of the band type it is used in an upright position while being carried and played. It has from early Germanic times been the absolute favorite of the military music corps of the German nation. Most of the glockenspiels of the national political forces such as the Allgemeine-SS, the SA, and political leader corps were converted from Imperial band instruments by the addition of eagle and swastika motifs in the 1920's and 1930's. This one has the well -known, sharp-winged, early-NSDAP eagle at its finial. This is a large instrument measuring 41 inches from the eagle's head to the section's bottom where the instrument would be joined to a carrying pole. The item has not been cleaned since found hidden in a barn in a suburb of Munich, last year. This is a truly rare NSDAP item and worthy of museum inclusion. It does not have the colored horsehair tassels, but is intact and you can still march with it and play Wenn wir Marshieren.

PRICE:  SOLD

 

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Small SA Belt Buckle (Item SA 6-3)

DESCRIPTION: Here is the rare, tiny buckle of the Storm Troopers; almost one half the size of the larger model. This is the one with the silver-colored, separate insignia soldered onto the brass buckle. Note the company logo on the back. Nice little specimen which measures 2 ¼ x 1 ½ inches. (Rare)

PRICE:  SOLD

 

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Hand-carved SA Man Figure (Item SA 6-4; ART 6-2)

DESCRIPTION: This is a great example of Third Reich art. In masterful carving the artist has depicted a Fahnenträger (flag bearer) of the SA. The detail is fantastic right down to the eagle on the cap and swastika tiepin. The standard shown is a unit flag with fringe and designation patch. The carving is very good almost par excellence! You can see this in the photos. Historic articles of the Kampfzeit (early struggle) are very rare and seldom encountered because of the ravages of war and the vindictiveness of the occupying powers. The sculpture is nearly 16 inches high from the bottom of the base to the tip of the flag pole. This is a great-looking sculpture and historically very important to the history of the Reich.

PRICE: $1,450.00

 

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Defense of the Fatherland

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Triumph over Bolshevism

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Reverence for fallen heroes

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Agriculture and Industry

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Magnificent SA Trophy
The Ultimate Relic
Wehrsport Trophy
(Item SA 6-5; ART 6-4)

DESCRIPTION: We now present to the collecting world the greatest National Socialist item ever found. We believe this and the greater preponderance of collectors. dealers, and museum people will agree. Nothing that has been found in the wonderful world of Third Reich collecting can really approach this item for sheer beauty and historical significance. The artistic accomplishment in pure 800 silver masterfully executed in pure art-deco style leaves even the art connoisseur from the leftist circles gasping when viewed. The strong militaristic implications and national pride embodied in the overall design immediately reach out for the fervent admiration of the Germanophile that is clear and certain. However, even Christies or Parke Bernet would love to feature this one; however, they cannot because the controversial swastika would alienate certain very vocal groups which would object stringently to its obvious message in art. So it can only be offered in private showing to a select, elite few who can appreciate its uniqueness and unquestionable beauty. Worth???? The sky is the limit, certainly. It is obviously one of a kind produced by a master silversmith whose love for Fatherland and a political dream is unquestionable. The woodcraft is also of masterwork variety in its presentation. The story of its discovery in America is utterly captivating and intriguing, indeed, and it goes like this. The odyssey of the trophy is almost what novels are written about. In the spring of 1997, and enthusiastic collector, Thomas R. Johnson, of Jackson, Michigan, became aware of the existence of the trophy. It was in the possession of an elderly antique dealer, who specialized in precious-metal scrap and old silver. the trophy narrowly missed being melted down for its silver content. The dealer informed Mr. Johnson that he had obtained it about 10 years earlier from the relatives of an American soldier, who looted it in the chaos following the collapse of National Socialist Germany. The soldier was reportedly killed in the final actions of the war, but had allegedly sent the trophy home prior to his death. Mr. Johnson was able to purchase the pedestal portion only, after persistent persuasion. On November 13, 1967, after being informed by Dr. Klietmann, a German expert in the awards field, that the trophy was incomplete. Mr. Johnson returned to the dealer and asked about it. It seems the trophy was dismantled to facilitate shipment, and the recipients were not a aware that the item lacked a trophy cup and that the two pieces would be integral to each other. The party who received it from the GI refused to part with the cup portion desiring to put it to use as a vase and this seemed to be out of some sort of misplaced sentiment and Mr. Johnson was rather depressed that his hopes of obtaining it seemed very remote because the dealer who sold the pedestal was extremely closemouthed about the family who had the rest of the fantastic item. This old man remembered that there was “some sort of a cup” around with it, but maybe they didn’t go together and the party didn’t seem too anxious to let go of it. But, Mr. Johnson persistently pestered the dealer until he followed through on it. The elderly gentleman kept on procrastinating despite several return visits. As time went by, it grew readily apparent that the dealer for some reason wasn’t really interested in tracking down the missing piece. All the while, Mr. Johnson did not let on that the two items belonged together. He simply said that he wanted to buy the “Nazi cup.” Neither the dealer nor the owner were ever really aware that the two pieces went together. The antique man stated further each time asked that the couple from whom he had purchased the pedestal lived miles away, but that he had known the family for most of his life. He kept telling Mr. Johnson “wait until summer and some warm day I’ll go down there, sitting out in the yard talking things over and when the time is right I’ll get around to the cup. But, as could be expected summer came and went and so did autumn and he never did get around to going. Periodically, Mr. Johnson would go out of his way to stop by his remote place of business to see if he had made his promised move. On one such visit the man was out, but his wife was at home. During the subsequent conversation she without realizing it revealed the first name of the party in question. Her comment was to the effect: “Well, Rex and them have always asked us to come down and visit.” Feeling that he had something he could go on, knowing that the antique man had known Rex all his life, Mr. Johnson on his next visit worked the conversation around to asking where it was that the man had been born and raised. As it can be guessed, they were rural people. In addition, by October 25, 1969, Mr. Johnson was of the opinion that there was little likelihood of the antique dealer bothering to go down to that part of the country very soon, if ever. As it turned out, it was the same area where Mrs. Johnson had stemmed from. Obtaining a real estate plot map from the clerk of that township, Mr. Johnson hoped that his man was a landowner and taxpayer. He also hoped that he still lived in that township. Mr. Johnson next underlined all the landowners in the entire county who had the Christian name “Rex” and even all those whose first names began with “R.” Many did not use spelled-out first names on tax roles. The first ray of hope came when it was noticed on the map of the township in which the dealer had claimed to have grown up, that there two sections of land, side by side, owned by two different men having the identical surname as his. This name appeared nowhere else in the county. Setting out on October 26, and using this farm as the focus of his compass, Mr. Johnson contacted the first farmer name Rex nearest there. It was curious sensation approaching a stranger asking if he was the party who had something of interest, but which couldn’t be clearly described, as it had never been seen. “I wonder if you could help me. I am looking for someone I don’t know whom, who has something I would like to buy but I don’t know what it looked like.” Good fortune went with him. For the first party contacted was the right one. Yet, after studying the 8 x 10 photos of the pedestal that were published in the Medal Collector last year, the man claimed he had never laid eyes on it before! The man claimed this despite the antique man’s assertion that he had bought it from them about ten years before for around ten dollars. Finally, the lady was induced to go into the house and brought out a couple of metal cups. One was a cheap tourist-shop beer mug with some coat of arms on it of a German city. The other was the Nazi cup and lid. The eagle and swastika section was broken off the lid, but it lay inside. Cautious negotiations began for its purchase that took about a month. Mr. Johnson wasn’t sure if this was the right cup, and the party was not sure if they wanted to sell it. It had not been a son who had obtained it in the war, but some distant cousin who had left it with them about 1946 and then vanished completely from sight. Seven years without word elapsed until it was legally determined that he was dead, allowing the original trophy base to be sold. Eventually, the sale came about in November 1969. That is only one week more that the 46th anniversary of the Munich Putsch, which brought the Nazi Party to prominence. The eagle has been professionally repaired and the entire trophy reassembled. Had Mr. Johnson not persevered, this might never have come about, and the two parts would have been lost in time, forever. Intrinsically, it is now in all likelihood the most valuable Nazi athletic trophy still in existence. Dr. Klietmann wrote Mr. Johnson to say that this cup was dedicated for competition at the annual Reichs Party Days held at Nuremberg, by competing SA Sturms as a challenge trophy. The German Hand Shoemaker’s Guild presented this trophy for the event. This National Presentation Cup was for competition at the Nazi rally until the Storm Troops were disbanded. Just what these games consisted of, and how they enhanced the spirit of Reichsinnung, needs yet to be explained. It is undoubtedly the largest Third Reich sport trophy to be recovered. The trophy base weighs 18 lbs. 3 oz. The cup and lid weigh 1 lb. 14 oz. Total 20 lbs. 1 oz. The base is 11 7/16 inches high. The cup 10 1/8 inches high. The total height is 21 7/16 inches high. The individual Storm Troopers that stand directly above the inscriptions of victory are each 6 ½ inches high and the detail of each of their shoulder boards are of different design. The cups capacity is one quart and the inside of the cup and lid are gold washed. the silver marks that were mandatory in Germany for the finest of silver pieces are the moon-and-crown configuration followed by the exact silver content (835) and the eagle symbol. These markings appear twice on the trophy: once on the flat silver surface on which the Storm Troopers stand, and once on the outside portion of the cup. The front of the cup says in German: Durch Kampf zum Sieg Reichsparteitag der Freiheit 1936, “Through Struggle Comes Victory. Reichs Party Day of Freedom 1936.” The back of the cup says in German Reichsinnungssmeister Pokal der SA Gestiftet vom Deutschen Schuhmacherhandwerk. This translates to: “Reich’s Guildmaster Cup of the SA Presented by the Shoemaker’s Handwork Organization.” This is incredible in itself that all these professional shoemakers across the nation got together and managed to have this magnificent and spectacular prize constructed at what must have been very considerably expensive in its day. Actually, there were wonderful government-issued prizes and trophies that were presented for various sports achievements and they were quite awe-inspiring, indeed. Various issues of the official art magazine Kunst im Deutschen Reich often featured some of these fantastic art forms; however, this SA Trophy has them all beat in our estimation for pure dramatic presentation and deep meaningful impartation of the National Socialist ideology. The figures each in their particular stance upon the pedestal represent and symbolize the purported ideals of the N.S. movement and struggle. Each of the four standing Storm Troopers represents a particular phase of the battle for power in 1930’s Germany. The first one drawing the sword is a depiction of the time known as the Kampfzeit in which the SA fought in the streets to achieve power. The decorative frieze below shows humanity doing battle with serpents representing the enemies of the National Socialist movement. The second figure shown with the sword has the sword piercing a dragon figure representing the Weimar Republic, democratic, liberal, and communist ideals. The frieze below shows two slain serpents. The Third Depicts a Storm Trooper who stands in reverence to those comrades who lost their lives in the struggle. He is at attention with boots together and cap off. The frieze shows humanity recovering with four dead serpents evidenced there. The fourth aspect shows the SA man holding his sword, now sheathed, and a sheaf of wheat. This trooper symbolizes prosperity. The hammer shown stands for industry and the wheat for agriculture. The frieze now shows an orderly pattern, a horse pulling a plow, with the swastika rising as the symbol of the sun with humanity benefiting from the victory of the N.S. Party. All of the intertwined mosaic beneath these first three figures is twisted and disordered symbolizing the state of affairs in pre-Hitler German politics during the 1920’s. Only in the last one (no. 4) is peace and plenty suggested and that would come with the party’s successful takeover. The SA groups or Sturms must have felt a deep satisfaction and pride when they managed to win this utterly magnificent prize. A Sturm was a detachment that contained, according to its purpose, from between 60 to 150 men, the cup was first offered in competition in 1936, and engraved in the spaces provided are the following winners: Pioniersturm 16/1 Breslau Pokalsieger, Sturm 16/120 Heidenheim Pokalsieger 1936, Sturm 21/127 Heidenheim 1937. Unfortunately there were no further events to which it could be competed for after this. In 1938, the emphasis was preparation for actual warfare and the SA Sturms were practically dissolved as they were steadily moved into the Wehrmacht and the competitions were increasingly brought to an end. Thus the fourth space on the trophy was sadly empty. The disastrous fratricidal war broke out in 1939 and 88 guns and Stukas were needed more than sport competitions. Still this remains a monument to the early struggle of the N.S. turbulent era. The trophy has appeared in several magazine articles over the years and there has been much active discussion about it for decades. The trophy has been in three different collections since Mr. Johnson sold it. The discussion has always had a bottom line that advanced the idea that the piece was, without a doubt, the finest Nazi article that has ever been seen by collectors worldwide and should probably be worth more than any Nazi relic ever sold; and that would include any of the highly decorated firearms that reputedly were the property of Adolf Hitler or Hermann Göring. The Göring wedding sword is absolutely gorgeous, but what is the historic message other than a marriage between two famous people? Nothing out there can match this trophy for beauty and historic significance. This piece is not only intrinsically beautiful, but no relic of the Reich has ever conveyed such a message in its artistic presentation. It ultimately and clearly stands alone in the history of this hobby of Germanic collecting. How do you price something like this? How? What comparison can be made for the sake of evaluation? Do we exaggerate? I think not! This trophy will be remembered always as long as avaricious collectors seek the greatest and finest in superb relics of Teutonic ecstasy.

PRICE:  SOLD

 

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Nazi Political Flag-Pole Top (Item SA 6-6; NSD 4-3)

DESCRIPTION: This is the early-style flag-pole top with the pointed wings, 1933 to 1934. This one is in great shape with the additional flying-saucer-style pole buffer that keeps the eagle from turning at undesired angles when used. You can see one of these pole tops on John Gunderson’s web page at $450, but it is missing the extra retainer piece. It is unusual to see one complete. This top is in beautiful condition with the black swastika intact with original paint. Very nice early Kampfzeit article.

PRICE:  SOLD

 

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SA Sport Shirt Patch (Item SA 6-7)

DESCRIPTION: This is a very nice embroidered patch for SA sport shirt. The patch has the fine embroidered early eagle of the Sturmabteilung and even the “Ges. Gesch.” is embroidered. This is a very fine addition to a Kampfzeit collection. Wingspan is 3 ¾ inches, height is 3 ½ inches.

PRICE: $125.00

 

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SA Sports Badge Patch (Item SA 6-8)

DESCRIPTION: This is the patch that was worn on the athletic shirt below and to the left of the larger group emblem-the one with large SA insignia and letters for the SA section. The badge is exactly as seen on page 120 in the Collector’s Guide to Sturmabteilung Insignia by D. Fuller. The patch is quite lovely in a brownish gilt-on-white-silk background. This measures 2 ¾ x 2 ½ inches. The actual design is 1 ½ x2 inches.

PRICE: $40.00

 

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Pair of Trommler (Drummer) Shoes (Item SA 6-9)

DESCRIPTION: The Trommler Shoe Company was under the commercial blanket of the Sturmabteilung (SA). It had many facets, including the Trommler Tobacco Company. Children’s toys were also often promoted by Trommler. In 1934, the NSDAP forced the SA leadership to sell out its interests to private concerns feeling that commercial enterprise was below the dignity of party organizations and individuals within the ranks of the SA or SS. Here is a pair of children’s shoes (boys) in the original Trommler box with colorful label. The original price of 6 Deutschmarks is still on the box label. The model is call Derby-Osenstiefe in brown rind box (beef color). The company was in business since 1887, before it was bought out by the SA. The petite shoes are similar to the SA uniform footwear. They are in absolute mint condition with the shoestrings intact. The box measures 7 ½ x 6 inches and is 3 inches deep. The box shows a little bit of staining, but is intact and in otherwise excellent shape. Here is something that may never turn up again (extremely rare!) and a great Kampfzeit item.

PRICE:  SOLD

 

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Huge Oil Painting of SA Man (Item SA 6-10; PICS 2-4)

DESCRIPTION: Please go to our section on Pictures and Posters for a wonderful rendition of an SA man. Painting can be seen at Item PICS 2-4.

 

 

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Contact Us

Please refer to item designator in parentheses in all correspondence.

Please E-mail for any additional information you may need.

If you prefer, contact 'Germania' at PO Box 68, Lakemont, GA 30552
or call at 706.782.1668 or 706.782.4398.


Please! do not call during the wee hours of the morning. The best time for calling us is between 9 and 11 am and between 9 and 11 pm eastern time.


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