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Imperial Russia

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Imperial Guard Cossack Kindjal (Dagger) (Item RUSO 4-1)

DESCRIPTION: Here is one of the more magnificent Kindjals that we have had on the site. This is a long one measuring 23 inches in its scabbard. Although probably made by Arabic-stock people, this one is very Russian in that it was formally carried by a member of the Tsar’s Cossack guard detachment evidenced by the gold inlay Imperial eagle on the blade. It is there, but through years of use it is rather faded. It also has the Persian Lion fairly noticeable as he bears his scimitar. The date ‘1899’ is visible in gold as well. The blade is still razor sharp as this truly is a weapon, not merely an item of personal décor. The handwork in silver and the niello work is superb. This one has the deepest cuts in the silver floral work we have ever seen. The scabbard bears the ‘84’ silver acceptance stamps with the wreathed Grecian woman’s bust portrait beside it, and there are horizontal slashes behind it. This indicates that the scabbard fittings were assayed by either Lebdkin in the Moscow region, or Yakov Lyapunov in the St. Petersburg region. They were assayers during 1896-1903, or so. The mark is called Kokoshnik. The blade is more than 15 1/2 inches long from just under the hilt to the tip or its very lethal point. Since the ball is still there we assume the owner stayed true and loyal to the “Little Father,” the Tsar, and we can probably also assume that when the revolution came he probably went with the loyalist white Russian forces and since the blade is a bit pitted throughout, we can use our hopeful imagination and picture it sliding through the guts of a Bolshevik revolutionary! What does this have to do with the ball at the end of the scabbard? The ball to the communists represented the orb of the Russian Christian Empire. When a former Cossack became a traitor and went with the reds he would break off the ball to symbolize his break with the Tsar. This one still has its “Royal Orb.” The leather on the scabbard is very fine; possibly replaced over the years. The scabbard fittings possibly were traded for and then decorated by an eastern native artist who was certainly a master in his own right. He puts a logo that serves as his signature on the upper scabbard throat. This one is the finest we have yet posted.

PRICE:  SOLD

 

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Russian Statue (Sculpture) WWI Cavalry Cossack (Item RUSO 4-2; WWI 8-3)

DESCRIPTION: This is a wonderfully detailed sculpture in metal of one of the famed Cossacks of the 92nd Pechersky Regiment of Riders. He is shown dismounted, but with his ever-present cavalry lance. He wears the uniform of a noncommissioned officer with his blanket roll and other equipment such as canteen and dispatch or utility bag. The statue is unbelievably heavy and the consignor thought this might be cast in gold with another metallic shell all around it. In some cases, that is how antique dealers smuggled gold out of Russia in the 1920s. The ‘92’ shows up clearly on the soldier’s epaulettes and the double-headed eagle is seen on the belt buckle. He stands 12 1/2 inches on the plinth. This is a very handsome figure, but we get one half if he turns out to conceal gold (it’s only fair). He is quite inordinately heavy; much heavier than bronze or iron would be??? In any case, it’s a great historical piece from Tsarist Russia.

PRICE: SOLD

 

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Imperial Russian Army Epaulettes of the General Staff (Item RUSO 4-3)

DESCRIPTION: The 1807 model uniform changes which followed the Treaty of Tilsit and which therefore owed something to French influence, Alexander introduced a system of epaulettes which remained virtually unchanged until 1917. The designs were based on three grades of rank: general officers, heavy fringe; field officers, light fringe; and, subaltern officers, without fringe. We admit we are not specialists in Imperial Russian uniforms so we earnestly SOLICIT YOUR HELP to further identify these banjo boards. We found something close in Mollo’s book, Uniforms of the Imperial Russian Army, but this pair we have is from the Nicholas II era, but they do look a bit like the 1807-model general-officer’s epaulette shown in the book. See our picture from Mollo’s book. They are in very fine condition and must be truly rare.

PRICE: $1,100.00; the pair

 

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Kepi-style Cap for Artillery Officer Shapka (Item RUSO 4-4)

DESCRIPTION: This is a very rare cap from the period of the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-1881 under the reign of Alexander II, 1855-1881. This style of headgear was used by line infantry and some artillery units. We have shown some examples of soldiers wearing such Shapkas. These are line soldiers of Alexander’s regiments afield. The pictures come from Boris Mollo’s book, Uniforms f of the Russian Imperial Army. The condition is ‘museum acceptable.’ It’s holding together, but shows intensive wear, but dignified age. We could use help in further identification.

PRICE: $1,500.00

 

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Stalingrad Chest (Item RUSO 4-5; BRITSCOT 1-10)

DESCRIPTION: This is not an item that I can claim a liking for. I won’t go into why; I’m a Germanophile. On the other hand it is a practically unique piece of world war history and will be a major feature of a display in a museum. What is it? It’s a wooden, hand-carved chest containing the whole story of the presentation of the Stalingrad sword 10 months after the German surrender. Winston Churchill presented this sword in recognition of the fact that the Russian communists (with the aid of the weather) had defeated the Germans at Stalingrad. It bears this engraved legend: “To the steel-hearted citizens of Stalingrad, a gift from King George VI as a token of homage of the British people.” Of course he said this tongue in cheek because he knew what lurked in Stalin’s black heart. The massive sword was forged by the Wilkinson Sword Company and several artists worked on it; some of them not regular Wilkinson employees, but special artists in their own right. One of these men was a fellow by the name of E. Fendick [Fendrick] and he worked for Johnson Matthey Jewellery Products in Hatton Garden, probably the most famous jewelers in London. All the gold and silver parts of the thing were made by Leslie Durbin, jeweler extraordinaire, while C.J. Shiner, silversmith, did the decorative finish on these parts. Other artists were Percy Metcalf and R. Gleadowe. Fendick and E.H. Lasiter were responsible for the gilding and rhodium plating on the sword. Now what we offer is the actual casket that was presented to eight of these artists in appreciation under the official auspices of the old murderer “Uncle Joe Stalin.” Of these eight only two are still known as to their whereabouts. The one presented to Leslie was damaged in a flood and is no longer known where it is. The one given to the designer of the sword, R. Gleadowe, was presented to the London Goldsmiths Hall by his widow, and this is exhibited in the display hall with the sword when it was loaned to the museum. The only one of these important relics available today is the one we offer. Although it’s not the brightest star in the sky for ardent Germanophiles, it’s probably the most important thing we have ever offered in the way of a non-German historical relic. When the casket albums were presented it was at a vodka party at the Russian Embassy in London where they were given the large albums with massive wooden bindings that contained pictures of Stalingrad and of all the commie generals concerned in its final battle.

PRICE: $7,500.00; not bad for the only one to be had in all the world

 

 

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POA Ring (Item RUSO 4-7; WEHR 22-14)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a finger ring of the army known as the Vlasov Army Russkaye osvoboditelnaya-Amiya Pycckar Ocebodumenbhar Apmur, abbreviated in Cyrillic as POA. This was the patriotic forces that were allied with NS Germany. The POA was organized by former red army General Andrey Vlasov, who tried to unite all Russians in opposing the regime of the monster dictator, Joseph Stalin. Amidst the volunteers were Soviet prisoners of war, eastern and Russian émigrés (some of whom were veterans of the anticommunist white army during the Russian Civil War). On 14 November 1944, it was officially renamed the Armed Forces of the Committee for the Liberation of the Russian Peoples. These men fought bravely alongside their western-European allies against the murderous hordes of reds. They were true Russian patriots and most of the Russian people agree with this assessment today. Included later in the POA was the dashing Cossack cavalry corps of General Helmuth von Pannwitz, the Cossacks of Ataman Domanov, and other white émigré formations such as the famed Russian Corps. It was a great mistake on the part of the Germans not to put more faith and support to these brave soldiers and officers. Things would have been different in the outcome of WWII. The ring is beautifully made and it is silver with the cross of Saint Andrew in blue enamel framed with red border in a shield shape. Above this also in enamel is the ‘POA,’ for Russian Army of Liberation. The sides of the ring bear the sunflower design beloved by Russians, Ukrainians, Georgians, etc. For details about our rings see ”About Our Rings and Silver Insignia.” These rings were made in Germany for the POA and there is the German ‘825’ silver designation stamped inside. This is a very nice historically important relic of the desperate and horrible war in the east.

PRICE: SOLD

 

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Alexander III, tsar of all the Russias

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The tsar and tsarina

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The tsar's personal coat of arms

Desk Set for a Tsar (Item RUSO 4-8)

DESCRIPTION: This is a museum re-creation of a desk set as used by Tsar Alexander III of the famed Romanov Dynasty. He was born in 1845; died 1894. Father of Nicholas II, he was one of the greatest and most progressive of the rulers of Russia. He was strictly against those who opposed his regime, but fair and generous with the peasants and gentry. History records him as Alexander “The Peacemaker” and he reined as Emperor of Russia, King of Poland, and Grand Prince of Finland from March 13, 1881, until his death on 20 October 1894. He was always highly conservative and, thankfully, reversed some of the liberal measures of his father, Alexander II. He was without a doubt the most admired of all Russia’s historic rulers. It is thought by western historians and revisionists that had he been in power at the time, the rabid wolves known as communists, would never have succeeded in their bloody revolution. Lenin, Trotsky, and all the other street scum would have been dangling from ropes in short order. He would have tripled the authority and power of the “Okhrana” (Russian Secret Police). He fervently believed that Holy Russia would be saved from the murderous Reds by remaining true to the orthodox faith, maintaining autocracy, and being true to the country’s national racial standards and high moral agendas. In the time of the red revolution’s beginnings, he would have called upon the mighty Cossack brotherhood to fight fire with fire for the sacred motherland. During his regime Moscow was called the “Third Rome.” His palace, the “Alexander Palace,” was the finest in all of Europe; at least in its imperial décor inside. The desk set that we offer here consists of a letter opener and a magnifying glass. The original of these pieces are on display in Moscow in that city’s museum. Even in the time of Nicholas Romanov II, this set was copied and often Nicholas would present such fine copies to foreign dignitaries and people whom he wanted to please both diplomatically and personally. This set was painstakingly done in the old manner of the great jewelers of the Fabergé company. This company originated in France, but Peter Carl Fabergé, born in 1846, saw his goldsmith apprenticeship in Germany. He was so excellent in his work that he immigrated to Russia and became the official jeweler to the tsar’s palace. Materials used by Fabergé included metals: silver, gold, copper, nickel, palladium—that were combined to produce different colors. Another technique used exclusively by Fabergé included Guilloche, a surface treatment that could make waves and striations in the design. This was done by hand and you can readily see it in the design in this offering. The diamonds that can be seen throughout these pieces are rose cut. Other stones such as the rubies are en cabochon (round cut). Much about Fabergé can be found on the web. The letter opener is about 9 3/4 inches long. The brass blade is about 5 inches long. The magnifying glass is about 7 1/2 inches long. The horse heads on each piece are in silver while the reins are in brass. The manes are plated gold. The rose-cut diamonds (genuine diamonds) are around the band that encircles the horse between that point and the plinth that it sits upon. The ‘A’ for Alexander is encrusted with these stones and they are found again in a band just above the dolphin’s head that seizes the glass. Tiny rose cuts can also be seen in three petite bows around the bezel of the magnifying glass. On the letter opener besides what we have pointed out there are more rose cuts in the design where the blade meets the grip or handle. On the blade is a stamping that is similar to the mark of Fabergé. The pieces are not original Fabergé even though the box and blade are marked so. This group is a museum-quality reconstruction done in the excellence and supreme quality as would be observed in the original. I don’t know if this is the only set ever made like this, but I highly suspect that it is unique. Surely this is a royal presentation in every way. While the original would be priceless, this set is offered at an almost unbelievable reasonable price considering the workmanship and precious stones.

PRICE: SPECIAL SALE: $2,250.00

 

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Contact Us

Please refer to item designator in parentheses in all correspondence.

Please E-mail for any additional information you may need.

If you prefer, contact 'Germania' at PO Box 68, Lakemont, GA 30552
or call at 706.782.1668 or 706.782.4398.


Please! do not call during the wee hours of the morning. The best time for calling us is between 10 and 11 am and between 9 and 11 pm eastern time.