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Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

 

 

Page 4

 

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

 

Please be sure to visit our Kaiser Wilhelm II collection.

Also, take a look at our Frederick the Great gallery.

 

 

Hunting & Shooting

Hunting & Shooting

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

 Prussian Cuirassier Saber (presentation grade) (Item KWEPS 4-1)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a spectacular example of the Prussian Cuirassier broadsword (Preussische Kürassier Pallasch. The Garde Cuirassier Regiment and the famous Garde du Corps Regiment of Berlin and Potsdam carried this style of sword fashioned after the French First Empire model, AN XI 1802-1803. Early in the period captured French swords like these were carried by various Prussian units as described above. Then German sword smiths turned to making their own versions for these elite units. TheGarde du Corps Regiment carried this sword until 1850 and Garde Kürassier regiments carried it until 1879. In its normal wear pattern it was with a plain black-painted scabbard. Thomas Wittman in his hornbook on the German words and daggers on page 165 says that one of the most sought-after Degen were carried by Cuirassier regiments (heavy, mounted cavalry). He says these elite horsemen wore the steel-breast and back-plate armor with the beautiful lobster-tail helmets. He shows a fine example of one of these swords from his personal collection, but, the similarity of that one and the one we offer ends there. The very special Degen that we have is probably unique, beautiful, and with a mystery. First, the hilt typically, but not so typical in that this one is heavily gold plated and has a wonderful palm-leaf-etched design similar to the style for general officers in the French regiments. The grip is wrapped in fish skin with a triple silver-wire wrap. The entire offering at this point is unique! Now the real surprise!!! The blade is of the finest darkened steel with double, highly raised blood pullers, or grooves. As would be expected, the sword is by WKC (Weyersberg-Kirschbaum and Co.) of Solingen. After the company found on the back strap of the blade, 9 inches are decorated with high-relief leaf pattern in gold chasing. The sword is massive with the blade being 36 inches long. The entire length when in the scabbard is about 50 inches. The blade is gorgeous to the sight of a sword fancier. The panels on the front show in exquisite detail the stylized Prussian eagle with Cuirassier sword. Behind it a set of Cuirassier armor and helmet appear above the eagle. Above this two Prussian standards thrust through a victory laurel wreath. More swords, kettle drum, bugle, etc. are surrounded by oak leaves and other floral decorations. In the center of all this is the Wilhelm II cipher surmounted with the Prussian crown. All of this is in exquisite detailed appliqué raised and highlighted in gold laid upon a Prussian black background. Now, on the reverse of the blade it has writing in “Wilhelmesque” letters that read: “Ehrenpreis für Hervorragende Leistungen auf der Kriegs-Akademie dem Ser. Lieutenant ------------- vom Garde, Kürassier Regiment.” This translates to: “Honor prize for outstanding achievement at the War Academy for the honorable Lieutenant (blank) of the Cuirassier Guard Regiment.” To us at Germania the missing lieutenant’s name is the most interesting feature of this magnificent sword. Obviously, the academy had a very special weapon crafted by the finest blade manufacture in all of Europe; a special sword among such pieces and then left out the name of the recipient. This is bizarre! Was the name to be added later perhaps to the junior officer who had not been selected as yet? Was a name removed (unlikely)? Well, that’s our mystery. If anyone has further theories, please contact us. The scabbard on this sword is also unusual. Instead of being the rather clunky brown or black printed on its plain-Jane cousins, this piece of Imperial glamour has a special crafted steel scabbard of the type used on horseback in high-dress gala functions. This lieutenant, whoever he was to be, would have received one of the finest Imperial Prussian swords we have ever encountered of this particular style. This is a truly beautiful museum piece of prestigious importance.

PRICE: No longer available

 

Hunting & Shooting

Hunting & Shooting

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

 Massive Prussian Officer’s Saber in Damascus Steel (Item KWEPS 4-2; ANTWEP 2-2)

DESCRIPTION: This is one of the most magnificent imperial swords we have ever seen in any collection and even most German museums do not number a sword this fine in their inventory. This is one very massive sword with true Damascus blade and wonderful, highly engraved décor. It is naturally a presentation from one Prussian noble to another. The “s/l” you see on the blade stands for “Seinen Leben,” or “…to my dear friend…” Both men are ‘vons,’ the attachment of Germanic nobility. The sword was presented in fond memory of their time spent as comrades in the Kriegsschule (War Academy) in the city of Hannover from 1895 to 1895. The sword is elegant plus. Its blade is such that it must have been a very expensive item in its day. Running ones fingers over the relief letters and floral design one realizes the sharpness of supreme quality that attends this sword. You might just agree that here is an exceptional weapon that is as good as they could ever be and then some! This massive sword is 41 inches long in its scabbard. The blade at the thickest point is about 1 3/4 inches wide. The blade is 34 inches long. The languet as continuation of the ‘D’ guard is decorated with a lettered overlay in silver that is very intricate and involved, but probably works out to initials of the recipient. The eyes in the lion-head pommel are either rubies or garnets. The back languet has an engraved crest and this is possibly the crest of the fortunate recipient. Because the languet covers that portion of the blade it is difficult to see it. There is a maker’s logo or signature and we believe there are none. However, the quality of the sword screams ‘W.K.C.” (Weyersberg, Kirshbaum, & Co.). Here is the finest type of Damascus steel employed as well in the beautiful tree-bark pattern. For condition overall this piece would rate as excellent double plus. The leather on the grip wrapped with silver wire is in excellent shape. A collector would be hard pressed to ever find a sword as fine as this one. We have attended the German Waffenborse (arms shows) for many years now and never have seen one as good as this ever offered. This is surely the epitome of Deutscher Säbel.

PRICE: SOLD

 

Hunting & Shooting

Hunting & Shooting

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

 Tunic and Sword of Diplomatic Service (Item KWEPS 4-3; KUNIFORMS 1-1)

DESCRIPTION: Here in all its imperial glory is the official tunic and the beautiful sword of the Kaiser’s Diplomatic Corps. No uniform of the Reich of Kaiser Wilhelm II was as absolutely gorgeous and grandiose as this. The tunic is fabulously decorated in gold bullion brocade in floral pattern. Six gold-colored buttons with the Prussian eagle escutcheon are to be seen on the front, while two more adorn the tails. The red collar and cuffs are also seen to be highly decorated with this wonderful bullion material. The lining is a fine silk grey sheen material. The pocket flaps are also decorated with the floral design that is reminiscent of the baroque period of Frederick the Great of Prussia and this uniform is as a matter of fact very “Fredrichen” (elegance personified!). The sword that is worn with scabbard thrust through a slot in the tunic is the finest Prussian diplomatic sword we have ever seen in collections or in museum displays. It has the wonderful gilded finish that shows very good former custodianship. All finish is bright and only worn a bit at the d-guard and eagle’s beak (the two spots that would get constant exposure to the hands of the wearer). The grips are of unblemished fine mother-of-pearl. The dramatic Prussian eagle is surmounted by the Prussian crown on the clamshell guard. The eagle-head pommel is bold and defiant as he clutches the D-guard that flows artistically into the rest of the distinct pattern. The whole of the sword is 34 inches long with the scabbard. The blade is 28 inches long. If you get it to the correct angle with a magnifying glass you can see the king’s head and knight’s head logos side by side under the clamshell guard. This logo is for the WKC Company (Weyersburg, Kirshbaum & Co., Solingen), the most prestigious and prolific of the Solingen shops and factories. The blade is finely etched with tightly patterned floral design on both sides and even down the spine. In the center of the obverse side in the middle one can perceive the beautiful national eagle of the Reich. This sword is in the white scabbard used only for high-dress occasions. The black would be only for court use. There are honest age cracks throughout, but with continuing care they aren’t going anywhere. The sword has obviously been kept with the dignity it deserves.

PRICE:  SOLD

Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword

Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword
Portapee
Presentation Sword
Imperial Eagle
Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword
Germania
Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword
Kaiser Wilhelm
Presentation Sword
Kaiser with Franz Joseph
Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword
Presentation Sword
The Kaiser's family
Presentation Sword
Some of the Kaiser's swords
The Kaiser's Presentation Sword from Solingen (in Miniature) (ITEM KWEPS 4-8 & WILHELM 9-11)

DESCRIPTION: We knew about these but never thought we would be lucky enough to obtain one. They are extremely rare; the last time we saw one was in a museum collection in Germany. It is a scaled down miniature of the famous sword presented by the City of Solingen in 1899 to Kaiser Wilhelm II on the occasion of his official visit to that city. The day of his visitation was turned into a gala event and after the great dinner at the "Castle and Burg," the monarch was presented with the most beautiful sword ever made in the city of swords -- so much did his majesty love this sword that he ordered exact miniatures of it to be struck and he presented them as gifts to his closest friends and respected important guests at the Berlin palace. The presentation was made with a small box lined with velvet that had a presentation plaque inside. This information comes from the History Museum in Berlin on the Unter den Linden. We have never seen an example of the box, but to even have the miniature sword is incredible! It is so rare...beyond rare...it is also beautifully crafted and spectacular in its design. The original presented to the Kaiser was without a doubt one of the most important and most beautiful swords ever produced in Solingen. The only other was the one presented to Prince Otto Lepold von Bismark, and when we saw the two at the Solingen Klingen Museum, we observed how similar they were. This little sword is an exact replica of the large one. The cup guard shows a depiction of the archangel Michael with sword in hand in mortal combat with the proverbial dragon. The crest on the pommel is a depiction of the Imperial Prussian eagle shield supported by oak leaves...even the portapee (or knoted cord) is there after all these may years indicating that the piece has been preserved carefully, deserving of this respect due to its importance. The scabbard is true to form with separate mid-sheath scabbard rings and escrutions. The sword is about 11 1/2" long, the scabbard included. The blade is absolutely wonderful! On the one side, it has the national eagle of the Empire and below this are the words, "Seiner Majestat dem Deutschen Kaiser und Konig von Preussen Wilhelm II." ("His Majesty, the German Emperor and King of Prussia, Wilhem II.") Below this legend are more oak leaves and the Prussian crown that surmounts the Christian cross in a sunburst. Below this is a depiction of "Germania," the female warrior spirit of the Fatherland, and just below is the masted ship that signifies Wilhelm's infatuation with making Germany a great sea power. The other side of the blade has the anchor coat of arms of Solingen and under this it says, "Im Dankbarer Erinnerung an den Unvergesslichen Kaisertage im Bergischen Lande am 12 August 1899. Die Alte Waffenstadt Solingen." ("In grateful rememberance of the unforgettable Kaiser Day in the Bergen land in 12 August 1899. The old weapons city of Solingen.") How's that for historical importance? This is a little treasure unto itself and a former possession of the Emporer of all the Germans. Below the Dankbarer Erinnerung line, there is a neat little depiction of a blacksmith forging the sword. Above the smithy are the words, "Hurrah dem Kaiser" and below this panel is the symbol of the famed cutlers chosen by the Solingen council to craft this magnifcent gift to the German Emporer...WKC, Weyersbsberg Kirschbaum & Co., Solingen. And it was WKC that made the few miniatures for Wilhelm as well. We would have to call this little sword one of the most important Kaiser items we have featured on Germania's site and we are proud to offer it. Only the original, full sized one would be more important than this miniature gem.

PRICE: SOLD

 

Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword

Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Maker
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Note trigger
Pistol Sword
Original engraved screws
Pistol Sword
Ray skin grip
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Pistol Sword
Hunting scene on cap
A Pistol Sword (Hirshfanger) (ITEM KWEPS 4-9; HUNT 7-21; OLD 7-4; ANTWEP 2-3)

DESCRIPTION: This is an utterly magnificent example of this combination weapon, a true museum piece in every sense of the word.  A pistol sword essentially is a sword with a pistol attached usually alongside of the blade. It differs from a rifle with bayonet in that the weapon is designed primarily as a sword and the firearm component is typically considered a secondary weapon, designed to be an addition to the blade rather than the sword being a secondary addition to the pistol. In addition, the two components of the weapons typically cannot be separated, unlike most bayonet fixed rifles. Historically, some early flintlock pistols were constructed as gun-swords with the barrel of the pistol attached to the side of the blade of a short sword or dagger. A shell guard protected the firing mechanism when it was employed in battle or in the hunt. These combination weapons were used by German and French hunters to kill wounded wild boar.  Examples of these hunting weapons can be found in the armory of Wawel Castle at Krakow, Poland and several great ones can be see at the Jagdmuseum in Munich. Their collection is the best. Hunting with this type weapon was mostly enjoyed by royalty or landed gentry; such fine hunting weapons such as these were not used by the peasant class. These items were masterfully made by the finest weapon cutlers of the age. They were very expensive in their time thus their usage was pretty much limited to the rich and affluent. This magnificent example that we offer is exceptionally well made with straight blade. The grip is covered in ray skin. The clamshell guard that protects the action is in brass with a central human figure with a bull that may have been a riding mount within “poetic saga.” This could possibly be the familiar portrayal of Europa with the bull. To each side of this pair are figures of mythical men that would put you in mind of Hercules or the Titans. These figures are all very worn (good wear) from many years of usage. The blade shows some engraving of game, deer and boar that are also quite worn down; there is also some vestige of Celtic or Teutonic design at the base of the blade. The D Guard and the finial are also in decorated brass. The weapon undoubtedly dates from the early 18th century. The flintlock pistol that is attached is of steel and is engraved with a running wild boar nicely offered in typical artistic style of that century. The firearm component is finished like a fine weapon not crude like other specimens we have seen. The pistol is signed F Schunke in Bingen -- this would be the hamlet of Bingen am Rhein. The entire mechanism functions perfectly, the gun is in practically perfect condition with the engraving on it much finer and very noticeably un-worn, unlike the sword.  This is because the gun is virtually protected from wear by the clamshell guard and was not exposed to the wear that the sword was. This weapon in German is a Hirshfanger: the traditional sidearm of the German hunter. Only a few were ever made in this combination style and thus are extremely rare and seldom found today. The greater preponderance of them have been snapped up over the centuries by museums and prestigious collectors. To have one as fine as this wonderful example makes us very proud to be able to offer it -- this is possibly one of the greatest weapons we have ever offered. A collector of German hunting weapons would do very well to add this one to his collection and it almost would have to be the “Alpha Addition” at least.  

PRICE: $8,500.00 -- most reasonable for what can only be described as a genuine Teutonic treasure.

 

Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword

Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
35 caliber?
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Trigger
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Blade engraving
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Back side
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Double Barrel Pistol & Sword
Signature
French Double Barrel Combination Weapon (Pistol & Sword) (Item KWEP 4-10 & HUNT 8-2 & FRAN 4-6)

DESCRIPTION: This is a true rarity deserving of the cover of a prestigious gun magazine perhaps? A combination sword or dagger & gun. These combination weapons are scarce enough but to find one with an over and under pistol as the accoutrement is “super rare.” It constructed with all brass fittings and the grip looks like a Napoleonic Sword of the cavalry regiments with horn grip or perhaps it is ebony? The brass guard supports a lion or panther head at the top. The brass clamshell hand guard covers part of the flint lock action. It has a very unusual trigger device as well. The piece was made probably by a professional weaponry blacksmith shop. It is signed by the maker in Paris. The action is inventive and very different. In one of our pictures supplied herein you can see the percussion hammer and if you look closely you can see that it has two strikers -- one top and one on the bottom. You can also see two nipple posts where the percussion caps are placed. When the first barrel is fired, the shooter can then in turn swing the hammer seen at the top downward thus enabling the hammer to strike the 2nd nipple post thus firing the 2nd barrel. Now and then these combination sword and gun ensembles are to be encountered in famous collections but never have we seen one like this. This example is prodigiously rare in the extreme! 

It probably dates in the 1860’s or earlier. Weapons such as these were used by hunters but also in warfare and also by police detachments. The piece may have had a scabbard but that is history.  Another usage for something like this would be utilized in sea service either the kings navy or possibly by pirates?  Perhaps that is why the fittings are brass that is less likely to be affected by the damp sea atmosphere. In that case it would not have a scabbard -- rather it would be stowed in the Captain’s cabin as a ready weapon to be used in the case of a possible mutiny. The possibilities are numerous but surely romantic saga has attended this magnificent double purpose sword. Of this we can only speculate but we can be assured that is a worthy museum piece that should be in a great collection.

Details: 30 inches long overall, blade 24 inches, the double barreled pistol is 6 inches long, the grip with the clamshell guard is 7 inches long.

PRICE: SOLD

 

Pistol/Sword Combination
Pistol/Sword Combination

Pistol/Sword Combination
Pistol/Sword Combination
Pistol/Sword Combination
Pistol/Sword Combination
Good size caliber - 45?
Pistol/Sword Combination
Pistol/Sword Combination
Note serpent face
Pistol/Sword Combination
Pistol/Sword Combination
Pistol/Sword Combination
Pistol/Sword Combination
Pistol/Sword Combination
Back side
Pistol/Sword Combination
Pistol/Sword Combination
Maker - Kaiser Mainz
Pistol/Sword Combination
Pistol Sword (Hirshfanger) (Item KWEP 4-11 & HUNT 7-22 & OLD 7-7)

DESCRIPTION: Another wonderful example of the German Hirschfanger that was a combination defensive weapon and hunting arm. To read more about this style of sword go to the specimen above at KWEP 4-9 and see it at HUNT 7-22 and OLD 7-7.  This particular piece differs in that is has a stag horn grip and a clam shell guard. Plus the barrel is of steel and the side locks are plain (not engraved). The piece is signed by the maker, Kaiser in Mainz. It has the d- guard as most of this type of weapon invariably has. All grip and guard fittings are finely crafted iron or steel. The piece is in firing condition and functions perfectly.  The period would be in all probability early 18th century. Today most examples of this combination weapon are in museums or special collections. They are highly sought after but seldom found. This is an excellent example and is prodigiously interesting as well as historically important.

PRICE: SOLD

 

Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger

Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Snake Blade Dagger
Serpent skin wrap
Snake Blade Dagger
Unusual Hirshfanger or Hunting Sword (Item KWEP 4-12 & HUNT 7-23)

DESCRIPTION: This should titillate the collector of hunting weapons to no end!  It is one of the most beautiful yet important Germanic Hirshfanger (Hunting Sword) that we have ever had the pleasure to offer to the public. It is positively unique and I am absolutely sure there have been no others with a blade like this one. The length of this piece definitely makes it a sword rather than a hunting knife (25 inches long when in the scabbard); it is a presentation made by the Shutzen Verein of the city -- none other than the German cutlery city of Solingen. It was presented in 1861, 150 years ago while patriotic Southern Americans were fighting against invading Yankees in the War of Northern Aggression. The grip is of stag antler with a beautifully carved depiction of a hunter with game call and musket. Decidedly top-grade carving. The brass crossguard is formed with a fully cast stag and wild boar, while in the center of this motif is a depiction of the dark forest. The clamshell guard has a relief of another hunter who levels his musket at probably a targeted game animal.

 NOW, the very unique feature – The BLADE! Here we depart completely from any standard Hirshfanger. The blade is crafted in very fine Damascus steel with gold wash trim that includes a beautiful stag motif. This is on the backside of the blade while the other side has the presentation in relief letters that come out to “Der Barmer Comeraden von Mitgliedern Des Solingen Schutzen Verein 1861."  (Translation: The Barmer Comrades and members of the Solingen Shooting Association, 1861.)  We feel this was a presentation from the Solingen Club to comrades of the Barmer Club -- Barmer being a district. Probably given to its president to display in their club house in Barmer in Wuppertal. We have seen that there is in fact a Barmer-wald in the Provence of Wuppertal (Wald is a forest.)  This is logical being that these men were hunters and shooters.

Now! The very unique feature of this wonderful sword. The blade has a serpent (snake) that is seen traversing up the center of the blade -- 3/4 of the length. 16 inches long and he is in high relief as he slithers along heading for the grip and presentation legend. He is fully three dimensional on both sides of the Damascus blade. We have never heard of anything like this motif on a German sword or dagger. The scabbard is covered in reptile skin of some type. The entire sword is in wonderful condition throughout. This is a collector's treasure; extremely fine and historically important.

PRICE: SOLD

 

Sword of Justice
Sword of Justice
Note Logo of Sword Maker

Sword of Justice
Excellent pommel ball
Sword of Justice
Finely leather-wrapped
Sword of Justice
Some of the wording (prayers)
Sword of Justice Sword of Justice Sword of Justice
Sword of Justice Sword of Justice Sword of Justice Sword of Justice Sword of Justice Sword of Justice
Sword of Justice Sword of Justice
Blunt end - blade very sharp
Sword of Justice Sword of Justice
Torture wheel
Sword of Justice
Gallows
Sword of Justice
Sword of Justice Sword of Justice Sword of Justice Sword of Justice Sword of Justice
Richtschwert (Sword of Justice) (Item KWEP 4-13)

DESCRIPTION: The Sword of Justice, or executioner’s sword, was used by trained executioners for carrying out capital punishment in many cultures. Given their special ‘ceremonial’ purpose, they were usually very well-made of the highest quality metal and were extremely sharp. Though otherwise unadorned, many were engraved with simple prayers akin to last rites, asking mercy for both the executioner and the soul of the accused. In their purest form in medieval Europe, they were only used for capital punishment, and only touched and maintained by sanctioned executioners. Sword execution, while not common, is still an accepted form of capital punishment by some modern cultures like Saudi Arabia. Swords of execution were specifically designed for the purpose of severing the head of an unresisting victim as quickly as possible. To this end, they were often considerably different from conventional swords intended for combat or training; European examples often had a blunt end and – 100 cm long blade with 5 cm in width. Sometimes they would be inscribed with an appropriate motto; a German example reads, ‘Whenever I raise the sword I wish the sinner everlasting life.”

This example that we present here would be termed “Richtschwert’ (Justice Sword). It measures 42 inches long (overall) with the blade measuring 36 ½ inches long and 2 inches wide and as described above has a blunt end. The hand guard is 7 inches across, while the grip is 8 inches long and is this long so that two hands would hold it thus enabling the executioner to better control the fatal swing. The blade has the prayers as earlier noted but although the sword is German the prayers are in Latin and laid out in a floral design topped on each side with etchings of a gallows and the torture wheel. These illustrated etchings depict the other trade specialties of the executioner. We were told that this headsman was none other than the famed Thüringen executioner Balthaser Glaser. We believe this blade might be Italian although some of them were crafted in Solingen, Germany. The Latin inscription leads us to believe it might be Italian. It does have a proof mark strike at the section of the blade where it meets the cross guard that looks somewhat like a bird in flight. The grip is wrapped tightly in leather and this looks original, while so many of the swords of this age are re-wrapped after the ravages of time. The ball finial is of the octagon shape and to the sword fancier this is a treasured feature. The blade is deeply furrowed on each side and these ‘blood grooves’ extend about 1/4th of the length of the blade. What we have here is a true relic of the early sword maker’s art. Actually a rather grim reminder of man’s inhumanity to man. We once viewed the collection of these “Richtschwert’ in the criminal museum in the city of Bamberg, Germany. We would have to say that this example we offer is as good as any of them we have seen there.

PRICE: SOLD - We do have another that has recently been added to the gallery -- call or write for details

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact Us

Please refer to item designator in parentheses in all correspondence.

Please E-mail for any additional information you may need.

If you prefer, contact 'Germania' at PO Box 68, Lakemont, GA 30552
or call at 706.782.1668.


Please! do not call during the wee hours of the morning. The best time for calling us is between 9 and 11 am and between 9 and 11 pm eastern time.