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Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Antique Weapons
Page Four

 

Victorian Sword

Victorian Sword

Victorian Sword

Victorian Sword

Victorian Sword

Victorian Sword

Victorian Sword

Victorian Sword

Victorian Sword

Victorian Sword

Victorian Sword

 

Magnificent Victorian Sword from the Victoria and Albert Museum in London (Item ANTWEP 4-1; BRITSCOT 4-32)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a truly handsome old recreation of a medieval knight’s battle sword. This is not a period sword yet it is a legitimate antique being from the reign of Queen Victoria who was England’s queen from 1837 to 1901. Queen Victoria and her husband Prince Albert of Saxe Couburg were both amateur historians. They were appalled that over the centuries before their reign of 63 years many of Britain’s castles and Scotland’s antiquely were stripped of their various regalia such as furniture, paintings, and weaponry. The Victorian Era was a period of industrial, political, scientific, and military change within the United Kingdom, but most of all the great queen’s private interest were all things cultural. She and Albert, with many great artists, sculptors, and metalworkers, set out to reproduce thousands and thousands of lost works of art to be replaced in castles, stately homes, etc., that had been sold or stolen from these important places of the Kingdom’s glory. Some of these replacements were crafted by the direct descendants of the actual original medieval craftsmen that reproduced the initial items of decoration and weaponry including armor and military accoutrements. The old respected firm of Elkington & Co. manufactured many of the silver-plated plaques wine coolers and table settings and is said to have produced some of the recreated weapons and armor.

The Sword

The magnificent broadsword that we have procured is rather huge, actually 4 feet long with a 39-inch-long blade. The massive blade is with three fullers. The pommel is very decorative and is of the Germanic style of the 10th century. The huge crossguard contains a circular sword breaker used to catch and pin the opponent’s sword if possible, thereby incapacitating the enemy so that our noble knight could dispatch him fatally with his left-hand dueling dagger. It was a time of high adventure and deadly agendas. The crossguard is very interesting in its design throughout and very beautiful and completely stylistic. This is one of the finest Victorian replacement swords we have ever seen. The museum now and then allows an item to be let go in trade for something else that they are desirous of obtaining. We believe this was the circumstance here. In any case, this is a sword worthy of being included in a fine collection.

PRICE: $4,500.00

 

Pistol

Pistol

Pistol

Pistol

Pistol
Note name of city.

Pistol
Note name of the gunsmith.

Pistol

Pistol
"True Damascus"

Pistol
Note beauty of Damascus.

Pistol

Pistol

Pistol
Ramrod insert

Pistol

Pistol

Pistol

Pistol

Pistol
Magnificent woodcarving

Pistol

 

Magnificent Double-Barrel Damascus Masterpiece (Percussion Pistol) (Item ANTWEP 4-2)

DESCRIPTION: Here is one of the finest “doubles” we have ever seen. It was made by a Brazilian gunsmith by the name of Bernardo Wahrlich in Porto Alegre, Brazil, which is the capital of the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, and is the largest city and port. The pistol probably dates about 1875, or so. The maker was a German immigrant to Brazil and definitely applied his Teutonic ancestry to the whole style of this firearm. The barrel of this masterpiece is in the finest Damascus metalwork that I have ever seen and I have been a Damascus aficionado for many years. To me, it’s one of the greatest metallic art forms history has ever seen. The tightness of the pattern and artistic conformity are incredible. The pattern is unbelievable. Set in gold on the top of the Damascus barrels is the French phrase “Vrais Damas, which means “True Damascus.” The mechanism with both locking hammers is crisp and resounding as they are engaged (perfecto!). The engraving on the lock plates is worthy and fully comparable to the very finest of German Suhl workmanship. The ramrod is intact and original. The names of the city and the gunsmith are plainly visible behind the hammers. As for the pistol grip this demonstrates the finest of the woodcarver’s art employing beautiful vines and leaves all magnificently presented. The trigger guard, ramrod holder, and butt cap are all highly decorative. The butt cap conceals a little covered door that features a grimacing lion’s head in relief. The pistol measures about 13 ½ inches long from the end of the grip to the front of the double barrels. This piece is worthy of a museum display and is the epitome of 19th-century firearms. Condition–“stone mint.” It has been carefully preserved down the generations by a family trust.

PRICE: $4,500.00

 

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
Handgraviert = hand engraved

Sword
The sword-maker's name

Sword

Sword

Sword

 

Bavarian Diplomatic Sword (Item ANTWEP 4-3; KWEP 5-12)

DESCRIPTION: Here is the most beautiful issue sword of the Imperial German era, a Bavarian court or diplomatic sword in mint condition throughout. The piece is presented in gorgeous silver plate with the Bavarian Lion featured as its pommel figure and also the lion is seen in repose on the clamshell guard. The grips are inlaid mother of pearl and in the center of the obverse grip is a wonderful escutcheon with the Bavarian crown and the “M” for Maximilian. In 1805 under the Peace of Pressburg between Napoleonic France and the Holy Roman Empire, several duchies were elevated to kingdoms. The Wittelsbach rulers of Bavaria held the title “King of Bavaria” from 1806 until 1918. The Prince-elector of Bavaria, Maximilian IV Joseph, formally assumed the title King Maximilian I of Bavaria on the first of January 1806, but his “M” initial was often seen on various items such as swords in commemoration of his founding of the Bavarian diplomatic corps far beyond his actual reign. Here on this regal sword his “M” is evident. The sword probably dates in the period before the First World War and was stored in a vault for many years and finally sold by the family in the 1980s. We bought it at an antique show in 2014 from a collector who, because of family problems, reluctantly had to let it go. But he wanted us to give it a good home and this we will do!

The Sword

We have already somewhat described it but in addition let me say that it measures about 3 ft. long in its scabbard with a blade length of 30 ½ inches. The blade retains about 80 percent of its blue-gold surface on three-fourths of the length. It has gold floral designs along the surface. The blade is intact with no sharpening, but has some old rust scars on the surface that I do not think really detract. The black leather scabbard is in excellent-plus condition and is fitted with throat and end boot that bear beautiful floral design. The inside and outside grip straps are also highly decorated with gorgeous floral decoration. The “D” guard is remarkably a special stylized type (quite neat!) These diplomatic swords are the gems of the sword-maker’s art and are seldom found in this sort of condition, if at all.

SPECIAL PRICE: $1,950.00; surely a bargain!

 

Armor

Sword

Armor

Armor

Armor

Armor

Armor

Armor

Armor

Armor

Armor

Armor

Armor

Armor

Armor

Armor

Armor

Armor

Armor
The book on Islamic weapons

Armor
The page with this armor group

Armor
Here is the actual item pictured in the book

 

Set of Egyptian Cuirass and Helmet from the Bodyguard Regiment of the Royal Guard to the Khedive of Egypt (Item ANTWEP 4-4)

DESCRIPTION: Here is one of the rarest of all armor sets that we have ever offered This is the official bodyguard armor for the elite guards who guarded the lives of the Khedive of Egypt. The term “Khedive” (Ottoman Turkish: is a title largely equivalent to the English word “viceroy”.) It was first used, without official recognition, by Muhammad Ali Pasha (Turkish: Kavalali Mehet Ali Pasha, General Muhammad Ali of Kavala), the governor of Egypt and Sudan, and vassal of the Ottoman Empire. The initially self-declared title was officially recognized by the Ottoman government in 1867 and, until 1914, was used by Ismail Pasha and his dynastic successors. This armor is circa 1865. The 1860s were Egypt’s golden imperial years when she attempted to build a modern navy and the empire cooperated with such other imperial powers such as France and trade was established. This set of armor was produced for the Khedive in France. The fabulous set of cuirass and helmet definitely merge in agglutinate harmony and it is obvious that they belong together. The helmet bears an arrow-pointed nose guard that also bears the feathered shaft of said projectile’s shape. The sides show the five-pointed star of Islam within large discs on each side. The chinstrap is comprised of interlinking chain. At the very top crown of the helmet is the crescent of Islam. The combination of star and crescent are militaristic nationalist emblems of the various states of the Ottoman Empire. On the front of the chest plate (cuirass) you can see a separately affixed star-burst-patterned badge which is shown by elitist militant groups within various Islamic empires that the world has seen. The metallic shoulder straps are quite handsome, as well, as they suspend from the back of the cuirass and they lay upon the whole front down to just above the waist. All in all, this 150-year-old set that was surely rare and unobtainable in its time is incredibly intact for its antiquity. I believe if one had $50,000 to try and find one it would be an unsuccessful quest. We believe there is one in the Paris Musée de l’Armée (a national military museum of France) but we are not sure it is as complete and in the same remarkable condition as this one. We are very proud to offer this wonderful coordinated group to the advanced collector. By the way, the very same set is shown on page 68 in the huge book entitled Islamic Weapons: Maghrib to Moghul by Anthony C. Tirri. This is guaranteed to be the set that we offer.

PRICE: SOLD

 

Antique Weapon

Antique Weapon

Antique Weapon

Antique Weapon

Antique Weapon

Antique Weapon
Medieval knight defending with a flail

Antique Weapon
Another style of flail

Antique Weapon
Knight using the battleax

Antique Weapon
Robert the Bruce in battle against his opponent with his battleax

 

Battleax and Spiked Flail from an MGM Movie-Studio Auction (Item ANTWEP 4-5)

DESCRIPTION: These two items are from an auction that was held May 4, 1970, when the MGM movie studio decided to liquidate a vast assortment of costumes, film props, and related property from the studios beginnings in the 1970s. Many were cataloged, tagged, and placed on the auction block. Some 350,000 items were sold: tanks, automobiles, boats, ships, et al. Highlights recall the full-sized sailing ship from the 1935 film, Mutiny on the Bounty. It is also important to note and keep in mind that many of the prop-room items that MGM pickers bought over the years were original weapons, swords, halberds, and guns from foreign and domestic sources. We bought a genuine Viking sword from that auction and it is practically priceless! The battleax offered here is presumed to be of East Indian vintage (at least the blade) and of course, it’s been rehandled. It has fine artwork seemingly hand worded on its surface. The flail was possibly taken from a Victorian weapons collection and sold very early in Europe. It is also referred to as a morning star. It was a very deadly weapon. The ball is wood so we believe it was made for display, but is certainly old. We are selling the two prop weapons together so please do not ask for separate prices. They will make a great display in the office or behind your bar, or you can have a medieval romp sowing the seeds of destruction at the local pub or garden party the next time you are bored!

PRICE: $850.00

 

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

 Wonderful French Rapier or Dueling Sword (Item ANTWEP 4-6; FRAN 4-18)

DESCRIPTION:  This is a magnificent sword of the dueling type used in the early-to-late 17th century and is related to the épée or colichemarde, the latter having a blade that features a wide forte which narrowed drastically toward the point after the forte ended. They were very popular and used right up to about 1800. The shape of such a rapier combines good parrying qualities with good thrusting abilities and its light weight also adds to the use of it as an extremely effective and lethal weapon. The sword that we offer here has all the qualities as mentioned, but it also has obvious connections to the nobility of the gentleman who owned it and wielded it. On the blade in the French language is the following as best I can translate: “Only honor would compel my use.” These words that the original owner had engraved upon this blade marks him as a believer in the chivalry of the age, practically nonexistent today. The sword has a special blade in its construction, as well. It starts with the upper eight inches being an inch wide and then there begins a radical narrowing of the blade right to the tip. This was an innovation that gave the weapon a strength for thrusting yet so very lethal with its deadly point. The grip is wire wrapped with brass supports that prevent the wrap from unraveling as seen on many swords with wire wrapping. This sword’s knuckle guard is in the “D” shape while the counterguard in clamshell is in highly decorated baroque floral design. The double-ring ricasso is also quite ornate, as is the pommel. So, in essence, here we have a very beautiful classic rapier, but also a sword that was a very lethal weapon of the romantic past. The saying on the blade evidences that a true gentleman once treasured it and no doubt it was his constant companion. This is a very important historical relic indeed!

PRICE: $4,590.00

 

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
Closeup of pearl grips.

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
The "dent"

Sword
The scabbard tip

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

 U.S. Infantry Officer’s Sword with Counterguard and Indianhead Pommel (Item ANTWEP 4-5; USARTICLES 3-12)

DESCRIPTION:  This was one of the most elaborate swords of the 1821-1850 period. It was a very interesting variation of the regulation infantry officer’s sword with the large counterguard, which was worn with the Regulations of 1821. It was the Indianhead pommel that set it apart from the others. The specimen we offer is a relatively early example of this type. The blade of this sword is straight and single edged with a false edge extending back 12 ½ inches from the point. There is a wide and deep fuller which runs from the Ricasso to the beginning of the false edge. The blade was originally blued for a portion of its length and decorated with fine line, gilt etching and portions of this etching are still very visible and there are floral designs and possibly military trophies. The grip is composed of two plaques of mother of pearl fastened on either side of a wooden core. Both perfect and unbroken. These plaques are deeply incised with grooves to hold the gilt wire wrapping. The top and bottom of the core between the two plaques are covered with plain, brass strips similarly incised to hold the wire wrap. There is a ferrule at the base of the grips decorated with the conventional leaf and dot design. The pommel is cast with the design of a bust of a female Indian facing to the obverse. The head is surmounted by a circular feather headdress. The baroque knuckle-bow, which attaches to the shoulder of the Indian is decorated with floral-leaf design in nice relief. The counterguard which turns sharply forward over the blade is decorated in high relief with another seated Indian figure with a palm tree affect above it. If viewed closely you can see the Revolution stocking cap and to the left is seen the American Federal eagle. Emitting from this is the quillion that ends with the head of an eagle. All metal parts of this sword are brass. The sword is nearly identical to the one shown in the book by Harold L. Peterson, The American Sword 1775-1945, page 77, with illustration on page 76. There are small differences as to the knuckle guard and counterguard. However, with the one shown in Peterson’s book and this one offered here would be that this one we offer has the original scabbard and the one in the book does not. The scabbard is also an artful creation of the times. It employs a wistful pattern of stamped floral design applied to several areas on the obverse, while the reverse is quite plain. It has two carrying rings and the frog stud for different carry modes. The sword measures 37 inches long in the scabbard. There are about three dents, but only one could be described as deep at all, but it really does not detract from what might be called a particularly beautiful and historically important American sword.

PRICE: SOLD

 

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
Note the paws

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
Scabbard tip

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
Note Damascus pattern

Sword

Sword
Notice the Bowie-style blade tip

Sword

Sword
Wilhelm II, possibly?

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

 

Magnificent Royal Sword (Item ANTWEP 4-7; KWEP 5-13)

DESCRIPTION: Here without a doubt is the finest Prussian sword that we have ever seen except a few we’ve seen at the Deutsches Klingenmuseum (the Blade Museum in the German city of blades, Solingen.) There are many resplendent presentation swords in museums and in famed collections throughout the world but they are for the most part strictly for the purpose décor and like a marshal’s baton, they were for show! and off-times specially made for an officer to present to his Kameraden to honor their service together. But swords made for combat whether cavalry or infantry were practically always rather plain and somewhat undecorated (except when they happened to be the weapon of a royal personage or perhaps a marshal or even a general. That may be the case with this magnificent sword. It’s very different than the other large-frame swords of the 1814-1914 German era. The other great Prussian swords we have offered are known as “Grosse Degen” or “great swords.” All have had similarities, but this one strays far from the rule in several concepts. The first thing noticed is that the usual lion-head motif on the pommel is far different from the standard type. His jaws are not open and menacing. Rather, he seems to suckle or bite the top of the “D” guard’s end. Also, and this is an absolute first, the designer of the sword has placed a set of the lion’s paws crossed and spaced behind the mane of the head. This is unique. The “D” guard flows beautifully with wonderful Florentine design and has the armored helmet of a Teutonic knight in its central portion. The grip is formed in tightly woven ray skin with fine, silver-wire wrapping. Our pictures show many other appurtenances and decorative motif that clearly stand right out. The gilding is beautifully preserved throughout the entire sword. The hanger drop rings are very sturdy as they would be on a sword that although stunningly beautiful would be created for combat. The drag or boot at the end of the scabbard is completely different and again definitely seen as a sword of war! Seen on the face piece on the guard is an iron-cross motif, but what is depicted on it may be a clue as to why this sword is so special. In the dead center of this cross is a figure “W” centered with oak leaves supporting it with the unmistakable Prussian crown above it. Now, let your powers of reason and imagination tackle that one. During the early times, the Wilhelm cypher (and this is definitely what this is) could not be used except for members of the Royal Dynastic House of Hohenzollern. So dear collector, what do we have here? Do we have one of the Kaiser’s personal swords or possibly the former property of Wilhelm the Crown Prince, son of Wilhelm II? The only other possibility in our estimation would be that it is a sword of the elite Guarde du Corp Regiment, the personal bodyguard detachment at Potsdam or Berlin, which guarded the Hohenzollern Kaisers. That is possible, but not too probable.

The Blade

This blade is nothing short of spectacular, rivaling some of the finest dress swords. The blade is measures 32 inches in length. The tip of the blade is not even close to being like the dress swords. This one is made to be lethal, with a Bowie-type point ending! All in all, this is without a doubt, the finest Prussian fighting sword you may ever see. I believe it may well be a royal sword and an early piece possibly predating Kaiser Wilhelm I. In all my years and world travels I have never seen a better one among the ones I have had the distinct pleasure of seeing. It has a Damascus blade of the finest style of the art. The extreme fineness of the work enables one to readily see only the pattern in the blued section of the metal coloration. The rest is just too tight a pattern to get a good visual look in the photography, but the entire blade is most assuredly fine Damascus. The blade is partially dark blue with beautiful golden overlay with groupings of weapons and floral frill all about. Even the edge of the back strap shows wonderful patterning in gold. The sword in its scabbard measures almost 40 inches long. It is signed P. Knechts Damast. This one appears to be made by an individual master swordsmith almost assuredly in Prussia (Berlin).

PRICE: SOLD

Trench Knife

Trench Knife
Stormtrooper of the Assault Battalion Rohr

 

Trench Knife

Trench Knife

Trench Knife

Trench Knife

Trench Knife
WWI stormtroop officer

Trench Knife
Another heavily armed soldier of the assault group

German Nahkampfmesser (Trench Knife) (Item ANTWEP 4-8; WWI 13-2; KWEP 5-14, WEHR 33-24)

DESCRIPTION: The nastiest knife of the wars and in this statement I do include the equivalent pieces in the American and British models of this horrible weapon of personal murder (up close, one on one) it really takes a special persona to come up behind a sentry (a living human being) and stab him or cut his throat and this knife wielder has to be I would think without any human emotion and I would think also of animalistic intelligence at best. OK, we know that these vicious weapons were developed as stabbing devices for use in close-combat encounters with enemy personnel and in WWI they were used in trench warfare when the enemy actually leaped into the trench occupied by Allied or Axis soldiers. This was the ultimate murder fest and the revelation of horror of genocidal and fratricidal mayhem. The knife we offer is in very good condition with some old-age rust on the blade. I’m positive it would clean up well with some fine steel wool and some elbow grease. Right under the top (pommel) there is a small hole that is drilled and I think it was meant to have a personal escutcheon that the owner would have placed there since these same knives were used in WWII, also. It could have been runes that might have been present there??? The grip seems to be of Bakelite or maybe highly polished wood: what do you think? What is really rare on this knife is that the leather belt device and the leather fastener with snap grommet are both completely intact. Practically all of these we have ever seen have been broken and torn. The leather washer between the crossguard and blade is also there and intact. The scabbard is fine showing some old corrosion, but still nice. The knife in its scabbard measures about 11 ½ inches long and the blade is about 6 ½ inches long. Actually to find one of these stabenstickers in this remarkable condition is quite a rare occurrence.

PRICE: $495.00

 

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

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Sword
The Klan at play about 1925

Sword
The Klan marches in Washington, 1925

Sword

 Original Sword of the Ku Klux Klan (Item ANTWEP 4-9; USARTICLES 3-14; MASON 1-3)

DESCRIPTION:  Here is something you will not encounter every day. We have seen two of them in the past fifty years. Now we were able to buy two of them here in Georgia from a man whose grandpa used to work in the foundry that turned them out in the 1920s and 1930s. The sword has the traditional crossguard with the hooded rider on horseback with the fiery cross, while the reverse has the letters “KKK.” The scabbards are in a painted black finish. This is the full dress sword for a KKK leader. The pommel has a knight’s head as seen on other fraternal organizations of the times. The grip is in black-painted wood; it has a straight blade in very good condition. The lower silver boot (fitting) has a draped U.S. flag (bunting style.) The two swords are in great, unused condition. The swords are three feet long in scabbard and the blade measures 28 inches long. There is no maker’s mark on the blade and there never was on any of them we ever have seen. The Ku Klux Klan is the name of three distinct past and present movements in the United States that embrace white nationalism, anti-immigration, and Christian values, as they saw them. Their history was often expressed through actions against groups or individuals whom they opposed. All three movements have called for the purification of American Society. The first Klan flourished in the southern United States in the late 1860s and vehemently opposed the Republican state governments in the South during the horrid reconstructions era sometimes using vigilantes against Negro leaders with numerous chapters across the South. Members made their own often-colorful regalia, robes, masks, and conical headgear designed ostensibly to be fearsome and terrifying and to hide identities. The second group was founded in 1915 and flourished nationwide in the early and mid 1920s, particularly in urban areas of the West and Midwest and it stressed opposition to the Catholic Church’s involvement with the U.S. Government. It managed cross burnings and mass parades, and also opposed Jews. This second organization adopted a standard white costume and used similar code words as the Klan of old. The leader’s sword we offer here is from this second period and probably would have been part of the full-dress uniform of a Grand Dragon (Klan Leader). The sword is in perfect mint condition throughout and is a real rarity. "

PRICE: $850.00; A great bargain! Others have been offered at even a bit less or often more money, but they are not in the condition of these two rarities.

 

Hunting Sword

Hunting Sword

Hunting Sword

Hunting Sword
Reverse side

Hunting Sword
The stag antler grip

Hunting Sword
The pommel

Hunting Sword

Hunting Sword
The crossguard

Hunting Sword
The obverse of the crossguard

Hunting Sword
The Royal crown

Hunting Sword
A hunting hound

Hunting Sword
Another hound

Hunting Sword

Hunting Sword

Hunting Sword
The acorn

Hunting Sword
The engraving

Hunting Sword

Hunting Sword

Hunting Sword
The fullers

Hunting Sword

Hunting Sword
The tip of blade

 Most Unusual Hunting Sword of the Late 19th Century (Item ANTWEP 4-10; HUNT 8-16)

DESCRIPTION: Here is one of the most unusual Hirschfänger (literally: deer catcher) that we have ever seen in collections or even in the hunting museum in Munich. It can easily be termed a hunting sword rather than a hunting knife. It is rather long measuring about 30 inches in its scabbard. The pommel features a fierce-looking boar’s head with his teeth and tusks bared. The crossguard has another boar’s head in the center and on the other side an antlered stag. At the ends of the crossguard are the sculpted heads of two separate breeds of hunting hounds (right and left). The grip is crafted in stag antler. The most exciting and unusual feature of the piece lies in the clamshell languet. It bears a crest or coat of arms surmounted with a crown. This royal diadem looks as if it might be the style worn by the Dukes of Mecklenburg-Schwerin or possibly it might be a form crown of the Austrian Hapsburgs. Under the crown is a Wappen (crest) with boars again, and heraldic bars. Because of the crown usage, this piece probably is an item for the Royal Hunt. The question is this: If indeed it is Royal ownership, would it have belonged to a king, prince, duke, or count??? That there is a royal connection to the weapon, there is no serious doubt. In those days of old, no one would dare to have such a sword crafted with a crown unless he merited it with royal heritage. The blade is 23 inches long and is obviously from the late 19th century or could possibly be earlier. It is no shrinking violet; it’s made for the kill!, not just for show at hunting banquets. It has strong double blood grooves all the way to the end. It is obviously constructed with the hunting of wild boar as its purpose. There is some floral engraving on the blade a third of the way up from the start of the blade at the crossguard (both sides). We believe most firmly that this piece was made to conform to the wishes of a notable who enjoyed “the sport of kings.” Who knows? He indeed might well have been a king? The scabbard is fitted with brass fittings. The leather is fine considering its age with no obvious breaks, cracks, or bends and appears to be original to the sword. The little acorn that would accept the carry frog is beautifully designed. There is no signature on the piece (not unusual). This is an utterly magnificent weapon for a refined gentleman of royal blood. "

PRICE: $4,500.00

 

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Back of the lion's head

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Sword
Museum inventory tag

Sword

Sword
Maker’s mark to the British E. India Company

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Sword

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Sword

Sword

Sword

 Ultrarare Sword from the East India Company from the Victorian Time of the RAJ (Item ANTWEP 4-11; ENGLAND 5-1)

DESCRIPTION: The British East India Company had grown from a trading concern to be the agency for the British Government in India. Its story is fascinating. It employed native troops and also British and Scottish military and maintained and administered its territory as three residences based in Madras, Bombay, and Bengal. The most-senior officer appointments were always reserved for the British. Much of the history of this incredible military experience can be studied by entering your favorite search engine and typing in “British Army during the Victorian Era.” Besides its governmental and military rule the company rose to account for half the world’s trade, particularly in basic commodities including cotton, silk, indigo dye, salt, tea, and opium. Always it had a firm foothold in India. It was, it can be said, to be the forerunner of “Amazon.com” dealing in practically everything. It became a powerful trade monopoly. Dealing in armaments, it actually maintained a navy having several commercial ships and men-of-war, as well. Its vessels participated in several famous battles.

The Sword

Several companies whose stock and trade was the manufacture of guns, cannons, swords, and other weaponry were contracted to the East India Company; large firms competed against smaller companies for orders. For them, gunsmiths and sword cutlers would strive to provide the absolute best and most exquisite offerings with precision workmanship. To receive and be authorized and to have the words “Makers to the East India Company” to be used in conjunction with their name was to be the absolute highest achievement that a company could attain and it assured those merchants that the British India Company would continue merchandising those products in the future. The sword we offer is highly unusual in that the swords that the East India Company handled were pretty much of typical British military design, but here we have a puzzling diversion from the rule. This sword when viewed by an experienced sword collector is almost 90 percent Prussian or German right to its “P” guard, wire-wrapped grip over black, patent-leather handle. The lion head is “hands-on” Prussian in every way to include his toothy bite on the top of the red “P” guard. The crossguard also has a typical regal lion on its foremost extension. The large clamshell languet bears crossed sabers that can be seen on German cavalry swords; they are crossed on the wreath of typical laurel leaves (also Germanic). The fantastic blade tells it all!!! First, one must realize that it’s in immaculate condition and has wonderful golden floral designs and is surmounted with a potpourri of flags, and a spiked helmet used in both British and German Victorian designs. The blade has a strong back ridge often called a bone breaker and its steel is bright and the blade ends in the typical style of German Imperial swords. To describe the blade one has to say the word “beautiful,” because no other word would do! So, we have to say that this weapon is absolutely phenomenal! The scabbard is the two-ring type in steel and is in the cavalry style. The sword had to have been made especially for a very tall man as it measures 42 inches long in its scabbard. It is by far the longest sword we have ever offered or even seen.

PRICE: $2,900.00; This is a unique and historically important sword. To call this a bargain is not by any means an overstatement.

 

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

Crossbow

 European Crossbow (Item ANTWEP 4-12)

DESCRIPTION: This crossbow is the type I have seen in weapons collections and museums in Belgium, Germany, and Italy. However, I’m no expert in these weapons and do not profess to know the age or national origin of this piece, but as a good judge of general antiquity I can say it truly looks old (really old). Now whether it’s an actual medieval piece or later I cannot or will not guarantee, but again, it is definitely ancient looking.

The Crossbow

It’s 22 inches wide and 26 inches long with an old white-painted upper deck and has fish-scale body carving and red and white traces of cloth accents on the bow (prod) The prod is loose; otherwise, in fair condition considering its antiquity. The mechanics of it are beyond my limited knowledge of this obviously important and rare item of ancient warfare and hunting. Everything about is seems to say old, old, old. This just might be a treasure. It is not as elaborate as some ivory-inlaid versions I have seen so it might be a peasant’s version; in any case, it’s the real McCoy, not a reproduction by any means. Somehow, I think this one will be a very wise investment.

PRICE: $1,800.00

 

Naval sword

Naval sword

Naval sword

Naval sword

Naval sword

Naval sword

Naval sword

Naval sword

Naval sword
Cutlass drill aboard a full-rigged corvette in 1863

Naval sword
A young able seaman of the period

 U.S. Navy Model M1841 Cutlass (Item ANTWEP 4-13; USARTICLES 3-16)

DESCRIPTION:  This broad cutlass was patterned after the U.S. 1832 Foot Artillery sword and is almost an exact duplicate of the French 1816 Foot Artillery sword. This sword was needed at the time to wield deadly force on pitching and rolling decks in the face of mortal combat. Only 6,600 of these swords were ever produced and just prior to the Civil War they were replaced with the more popular M1861 (aka M1860) naval cutlass of which 24,000 were produced. There are not that many of these cutlasses available, but they show up from time to time and are truly rare and an important relic of American history that is more than 175 years old. This has all of its aged natural patina; it does have a few small battle nicks. It’s obvious that it saw naval combat. It was undoubtedly made by Ames, but through honest age and use the Ames name has long ago rusted away. The rust is also old and controlled and the blade looks fine. The D-guard is only slightly bent where almost every other example of these rare swords that we have seen, the D-guards are somewhat radically bent. The sword has no scabbard. This is not at all unusual as many of the swords were issued sans scabbard, as they were “rack swords” that were mounted ready for use on the bulkheads of the armory on the war frigates of the U.S. Navy. The stampings that record the sword’s position on the ship is also gone with years of polishing. No inspector’s marks are visible, either. The American federal eagle on the pommel is there and still sharp. The fish-scale design on the grip gives a good handhold for the sword’s wielder. Its overall length is 26 ½ inches with a blade length of 21. The lethal look of the sword is similar to the famed gladius, the Roman Legionnaires’ shortsword. This great piece of American history is reasonably priced.

PRICE: SOLD

 

 

Sword

Sword

Sword
The carvings

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
The tip of the cane

Sword

Sword
The name of the maker or the owner in N.Y.

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
The lethal point

Sword

Sword

 Fabulous American Sword Cane circa Mid-19th Century (Item ANTWEP 4-14; USARTICLES 3-17)

DESCRIPTION:  Here is a delightful sword cane. It was made as such and not constructed from a sword or rapier. In gold letters on the blued blade are the words “D. Klanberg Newyork” (sic), along with some floral and other designs. It has a triangular shape with a cutting edge on the under portion (lethal indeed). The sword when in the cane stock or mount measure 35 inches long. The blade is 16 inches long. The handle of this cane is of bone; possibly whale bone or walrus tusk. It is ornately hand carved with a hunter’s hat, knife, a flintlock musket, a hunter’s trophy bag, and a powder horn. The handle is comprised of three separate sections of beautifully carved bone. The throat where the sword blade fits into is silver capped, as is the tip of the cane’s bottom. Yes, there is the usual age cracking that has fully stopped many years ago and the handle is firm and steady. The name “D. Klanberg” may be the company name of the firm that produced the blade or it could be the name of the gentleman who owned and carried it, but for sure it is a top-quality weapon for the man who insisted on defending himself. This is a rare and rather exotic weapon and would have been an absolute necessity when a gentleman might be walking in such areas of N.Y. City in the 1860s and ‘70s like the area known as “Hell’s Kitchen.”

PRICE: $2,500.00; this one is museum quality and ultrarare indeed

 

 

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

 

Special Lodge Sword of the Patriarchs Militant Branch of the Odd Fellows (Item ANTWEP 4-15; USARTICLES 3-11)

DESCRIPTION: First formed by military veterans as the Patriarchal right after the U.S. Civil War. This was a particular branch of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and it was recognized as its highest branch in 1885. The name “Patriarchal Militant” conveys the two-fold idea of peace and soldiery valor. The motto of the degree is “Justitia Universalis” (Universal Justice) and the battle cry is “Aut Pax Aut Bellum” (“Either Peace or War”). On the pommel of the sword is the globe-looking sphere with a band running all around it with the name of the organization on it. The grip has black, wire-wrapped leather and the crossguard is formed of crossed Roman gladius swords. What else? Did we not say they were militaristic? What could be more so than the trusty sword of the Roman Legionnaires with their famed eagle-head grips? On the scabbard can be seen a highly decorative plaque employing a human hand that displays the Roman gladius once again. The blade has the officer’s name that looks to be D. Robinett. The rest of the engraving is typical depicting floral patterns and row of tents as used by crusaders of old. Along with these temporary abodes are shown Templar-type knights standing ready for battle. The blade shows much age and distress, but the figures are discerned. This sword is almost extinct in collectors’ circles. This is the first one we have seen, in fact. You will see numerous lodge swords of the Freemasons, Knights of Columbus, Mystic Knights of the Sea Lodge, the regular Odd Fellows, and even the Ku Klux Klan, but a sword like this, almost never. So we feel we are offering a rarity here and the Roman Gladius theme as the military to me is rather interesting and makes this an important piece of American history.

PRICE: $450.00

 

Arkansas Toothpick

Arkansas Toothpick


Arkansas Toothpick
Arkansas Toothpick
Arkansas Toothpick
Arkansas Toothpick
Arkansas Toothpick
Arkansas Toothpick
Arkansas Toothpick
Fancy Arkansas Toothpick (Item ANTWEP 4-16; USARTICLES 3-1)

DESCRIPTION: This is a great example of the American classic knife used by mountain men, Mississippi riverboat gamblers, and gunslingers and was often used in the stockings of ‘shady ladies’ in a smaller version. This one has a belt or boot clip and could have been used by any of the above. It has been said of Billy the Kid that he wore one tucked in his boot as a secondary weapon to his Colt Bisley revolver. The best and finest of these knives were manufactured in England and were the most expensive in the 1840s and 50s. The one we offer is certainly one of these classic examples. It has a genuine bone grip with Florentine pommel design nicely carved in bone. The crossguard and its upper section that join the grip are in genuine silver and note that the design closely matches the motif of the carved-bone pommel. The scabbard is also silver although of a lesser grade, but beautifully engraved with floral motif all over its front side. The fastening clip that protrudes from the throat is sturdy and certainly significantly utilitarian to its purpose. This would have been worth many times its weight in gold in the era of the Wild West. Somehow it has a San Francisco look to it. Does it to you? This is beautiful little lethal “charmer” whose intent was always to be glamorous, yet deadly.

PRICE: $1,800.00
Germania International will not ship any item that contains any animal parts to any country where such items are prohibited!

 

Helmet

Helmet


Helmet
The outside liner retainers

Helmet

Helmet
The falcon beak is the signature part of a true cabasset

Helmet
The liner is absent

Helmet

Helmet
The hole for hanging the helmet in the barracks or castle

Helmet

Helmet

Genuine Medieval Cabasset Helmet circa Late 16th Century (Item ANTWEP 4-17; IFAS 4-21)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a typical Italian steel cabasset helmet. They were worn by foot soldiers, and like its Spanish counterpart, it was worn by infantry in the pike-and-shot formations. The stalklike projection on the top resembles a pear, which is how it gained its fame. It was popular in sixteenth-century England and was used in the English Civil War. Several of these helmets were taken to the New World by the Pilgrim Fathers and at least one has been found on Jamestown Island in the Commonwealth of Virginia. They were popular in several European armies; especially in Italy. We believe that this one is Italian because of the décor of brass rivet escutcheons that once held the cloth liner in position. Inside there are traces of that liner still clinging to the rivets. This is a genuine museum piece seldom found outside museum collections. The condition rates fair to good with minor dents and mild pitting. All in all this is a superlative example of a great example of European armor. No fancy “go to court” piece of armor here. This is a combat helmet for the medieval foot soldier.

PRICE: $2,500.00

 

Musket

Musket

Dug-up Flintlock Musket Lock Plate (Item ANTWEP 4-18; USARTICLES 3-18)

DESCRIPTION: This was found in a dig many years ago near Fort Niagara on the eastern bank of the Niagara River at its mouth on Lake Ontario. The location was a fortification originally built to protect the interests of New France in North America. First built in 1678 the fort played an important part in the French and Indian War and fell to the British in a nineteen-day siege in July of 1759. This is called “The Battle of Fort Niagara.” The commander of the post surrendered the fort to British commander Sir William Johnson (Johnston), who initially led the New York Militia. The Ulster Irish-born Johnson won the day and the fort remained in British hands for the next thirty-seven years. It served as a loyalist base in New York during the American Revolutionary War for Colonel John Butler and his Butler’s Rangers, the Tory militia under the command of the British army. Lt. Col. William Stacy of the American Continental Army was captured at the attack on Cherry Valley, New York, by Butler’s Rangers. He was held captive at Ft. Niagara during the summer of 1779. Niagara became notorious for drinking, brawling, whoring, and cheating, crude taverns, stores and bordellos spouted on “the bottom,” the riverside flat below the fort. American forces occupied the fort in 1796.

The Lock

This is a typical lock from one of the flintlock muskets of that period. It was dug up in the 1920s near that area known as “the bottom” when it was still possible and legal to dig there. It was in the personal collections of at least two citizens of Buffalo, N.Y. and finally in the possession of a man from Jamestown, N.Y., who died a few years ago. It is, of course, highly rusted, but retains its shape nevertheless. The cock, frizzen, and lock plate are all there. Even the tabs for attachments are present. From our experience in handling eighteenth-century long arms we want to assume that this piece is from a Charleville musket, which was the standard flintlock weapon issued to French troops throughout the 18th century. The lock was found without the barrel or any other fittings when the archeological dig was made; some French military buttons and pewter cups and coins were unearthed nearby. So, it remains a mystery of sorts, but it is a scarce item as dug-up items ever go.

PRICE: $250.00; what a terrific desk ornament or an interesting knick-knack if framed

 

Personalized Dirk
Personalized Dirk

Personalized Dirk
The presentation
Personalized Dirk
Personalized Dirk
Engraving at the throat
Personalized Dirk
Personalized Dirk
Note tiny thistles
Personalized Dirk
Personalized Dirk
Personalized Dirk
Personalized Dirk
Personalized Dirk
Personalized Dirk
Personalized Dirk
Personalized Dirk
Personalized Dirk
Personalized Dirk
Personalized Dirk
Personalized Dirk
Cased and Presented Scottish Dirk of the 78th Highlanders (Item ANTWEP 4-19; SCOTWEAPON 1-5)

DESCRIPTION: This is one of the neatest Highland dirks we have ever encountered; it is a scaled down version worn in military dress.  However, this one was only about ½ the size of the normal military model and specially constructed for a piper and possibly unique!  It was presented to a piper named Donald Fraser in 1876. In 1757 the 78th Fraser Highlanders were raised by Lt. Col. Simon Frazer of Lovat and sent to fight the French in the French and Indian War; it was disbanded in 1763 but the name still lives with the 78th Highlander Regiment of foot that was raised in the late 18th century for service against the French in the Napoleonic Wars.  Later the regiment fought bravely in many a fray at Maida, Java, Koosh-ab and Persia, Lucknow during the Indian Mutiny of 1857, and Afghanistan 1879-80. Then at some point they were amalgamated with the Seaforth Highlanders and fought at Tel El Kasir, Egypt 1882, the Chritral Expedition 1895, Albara, and Khartoum.  Their battle history is replete with heroism and glory and though the years their pipe band has been the best of all the Regiments.  This dirk was presented to Donald Frasier for his excellent performance and wining a competition of the tradition bagpipe chanting known as Piobaireachd.  This is a team that basically means the art of piping.  The words Pibroch and the Gaelic Piobaireachd are also referred to by some in the older almost ancient word Philbrochs. But all of them are used by pipers from various regions and military regiments in Scotland. “Pity the man who hears the Skirl o’ the pipes and wha’ not born in Scotland.”

The dirk is magnificent with silver fittings and a beautiful rose topaz in its pommel. The grip is fashioned from bog oak with fifteen silver studs imbedded in it. The small knife and fork have cairngorm crystal stones in their pommels.  All fittings are in silver.  At the throat of the scabbard is the name of Donald Fraser 78th Highland Rgt. 1876. Note: the name Fraser (Fraser Highlanders) I’d say due to his name this might have had a wee bit of influence on the judges. What say ye? But they must have really appreciated his performance to present him such a glorious gift as this. The dirk scaled down would fit in well when wearing the high dress regalia with its tuxedo style tunic.  The dirk is a little over 10 inches long in its scabbard.  The blade is quite plain and is in great shape.  The entire dirk is almost mint condition. It still, remarkably, has its original presentation case with snap lock and it has the presentation words on the top:

   Donald Frasier
78th Highland Regiment
For Philbrochs 1876.

They used the Gaelic name for what we call Pibroch (Philbrochs). The Fraser Highlanders were the first to use the bio- dag or dirk as we know it today in its decorative form like this one we offer here. This petite weapon is obviously very beautiful but prodigiously important to history as well.

PRICE: SOLD

 

Percussion Pistol

Percussion Pistol

 

Percussion Pistol

Percussion Pistol

Percussion Pistol

Percussion Pistol

Percussion Pistol

Percussion Pistol
Trigger

Percussion Pistol
Barrel engraving

Percussion Pistol
Grip engraving

Percussion Pistol
The Meyer and Mortimer name

Percussion Pistol

Percussion Pistol

Percussion Pistol

Percussion Pistol

Percussion Pistol
The rock crystal jewels

Percussion Pistol

Percussion Pistol

Percussion Pistol

Percussion Pistol

Percussion Pistol

 

Brace of Highly Ornate Scottish Percussion Pistols (Item ANTWEP 4-20; SCOTWEAPON 1-15)

DESCRIPTION: The markings on these wonderful pistols are none other than Meyer & Mortimer, one of the oldest firms among the Savile Row fraternity. The company traces its heritage back to the 1790s when Jonathan Meyer, a tailor from Austria, established a tailoring and military outfitting business at 36 Conduit St. at the north end of Savile Row. Around the same time, in Edinburgh, Scotland, the Mortimer family was specializing in military outfitting, supplying officers with swords, ceremonial dirks, and firearms. Many Mortimer weapons remain in existence. The Meyer firm made garments for the prince regent and, later, for George VI, and leading autocrats and military commanders of the day. The firm followed the British forces in the Waterloo campaign. Later, after amalgamation, one of the notable clients was the legendary dandy Beau Brummel. Meyer & Mortimer continued to offer very fancy weapons such as this set of pistols that served to augment very special Highland dress outfits for Scottish lairds and nobility. No doubt this elegant set was one such item. The pistols are set in a case that no doubt was made for them later and is not the original box. However, they are in form-fitted slots with a Scottish-themed powder flask and there are two compartments for pistol ball ammunition. The late owner was a member of the Cameron Highlanders and he probably was the man who had the case fitted to the pistols. His regimental badge graces the top of the case. The guns are beautifully engraved as would be expected of any weapon offered by Meyer & Mortimer. They are typical Scottish belt pistols with clips on their reverse sides meant to secure them to the wearer’s belt. The grips are fitted with framed Scottish rock crystal, gem-cut stones in bright diamond quality. We have visited many museums in Scotland and Britain and have seen wonderful Scottish and British weapons and can say that this set is right up there with some of the finest examples and thus is extremely important historically in that it is from Meyer & Mortimer, the noble firm catering to kings and nobility. I am sure nobody would endeavor to load the pistols up and fire them, but I would have to say that they are very mechanically sound and ready to use if the new owner suddenly feels threatened by the “Sassenachs” (English or Saxon). This pistol ensemble is without a doubt absolutely beautiful and prodigiously important. It’s decidedly a great investment.

PRICE: $12,000.00. The consignor will also consider barter and trade involving unique swords.

 

Dagger

Dagger

 

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

 

Indonesian Keris (Excellent Specimen) (Item ANTWEP 4-21)

DESCRIPTION: This is a very fine example of a Keris from Madura in Indonesia. The ivory hilt is typically carved with foliage and the winged horse. This design element was said to be copied from the Dutch in the early colonial years. The floral patterns combine to create a subtle zoomorphic grip in the form of a lycanthrope rakshasa, or “weretiger.” The hilt undoubtedly dates to the middle nineteenth century as does the silver mendak (ferule) and scabbard. The blade, however, is at least from the eighteenth century and possibly the late seventeenth. It features good, strong pamor (Damascus pattern) and is in great shape throughout.

PRICE: $1,200.00; An absolutely more-than-reasonable offer here for this great museum piece.

 

Dagger

Dagger

 

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger
Illuminati-style compass and square

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger

Dagger
The all-seeing eye of the Illuminati

Dagger
Reputed Illuminati ceremony

Dagger

 

Cult Dagger of the Grand Lodge of Illuminati (Item ANTWEP 4-22; MASON 1-4; Special Items)

DESCRIPTION: This term “Illuminati” refers to a group that broke with the Masonic Order in May 1776, and was mastered by its founder, Adam Weishaupt, who was an 18th-century far-leftist Bavarian, and member of several odd, secular societies. It has been said by some that the Illuminati was an Enlightenment-Age Society made up of those who advocated so-called free thought and secularism, extreme liberalism, socialism, and gender equality, and they were recruited from the Masonic Lodges and professed to teach far-left rationalism through “Mystery Schools.” It was also said to be a hotbed of conspiratorial plots to overthrow the Bavarian Monarchy and its Roman Catholic religion. There was a well-founded theory that this secret order was very much responsible for and supplied the masterminds behind the French Revolution and the Reign of Terror (June 1793-1794). The Illuminati was accused of being a dangerous group of subversives who were attempting to secretly orchestrate a revolutionary wave in Europe and the rest of the world in order to spread the most radical ideas and the movement known as the “Enlightenment,” and it was said that some of its innermost meetings were seen by some to be with the trappings of Satanism. This has been the theory of nationalist movements and leaders worldwide. In National Socialist Germany under Adolf Hitler, persons thought to be members of the generally subversive group were arrested and sent to concentration camps posthaste! Even today, we see evidence of the nefarious movings of this cult, except the new terminology is “The New World Order.”

The Dagger

For such an “instrument of evil,” this weapon is certainly beautiful! Its pommel is the leering skull in silver while the grips are of mother of pearl and are intact and gorgeous. They are held in place with silver side panels with hand-engraved floral-decorated work. The crossguard is shaped as crossbones giving it a very eerie effect. The most incredible part of this fantastic weapon is the very lethal blade. Yes, lethal, in fact, deadly. It is a wavy blade that ripples about 12½ inches, and half of it from the crossguard down is richly imbued with gorgeous embellishment on a field of fine, rich, gold background. Some of the illustrations start on the front side with a skull and crossbones, and halfway up from that is a figure that looks like the stylized square and compass as used on Illuminati art of the 18th century. In addition, here we find beautiful floral designs peculiar to the era. On the reverse side just past the crossguard of the blade there is the star of the morning of the type used in occult ceremonies worldwide. Above this is the figure that resembles a scorpion and above this a half moon with six stars, and above this, the compass appears again. It is noted that in practicing Master Mason degrees, swords were often used, but not a dagger because it was looked on as an assassin’s weapon. It has often been said that the Illuminati used daggers in its secret meetings and ceremonies. The pictures you see here unfortunately do this “special dagger” no favors—its macabre beauty can only be fully appreciated when viewing it in hand. This is an exceptional piece of exotic weaponry: possibly unique!

PRICE: SOLD

 

Rapier

Rapier

 

Rapier

Rapier

Rapier

Rapier

Rapier

Rapier

Rapier

Rapier

Rapier

Rapier

Rapier

Rapier

 

Rapier with Horn Grip (Item ANTWEP 4-23)

DESCRIPTION: This is an extra-long example of a European cup-guard rapier of the Germanic or Italian style. Rapiers were produced for the greatest part around 1500 to the middle of the 19th century. Rapier is a loose term for a slender, sharply pointed sword. It is optimized to be a thrusting weapon but cutting or slashing attacks have been recorded in the history of this weapon. The word rapier generally refers to a long-bladed sword characterized by a protective hilt which is constructed to provide protection for the hand wielding the sword. The blade might be sharpened along both its edges. It is designed to perform quick and nimble thrusting attacks. The blade length of quite a few historical examples particularly in the early 17th century is well over 115 cm (45 inches).

The Rapier

The one we feature is unusual in that it has a bone grip. The pommel is typical of both Germanic and Italian styles. The recurve on the crossguard is of the typical style used by both of these. The swept up d-guard and the cup section is of the type seen on museum specimens from both Germany and Italy. Since it is a thrusting weapon this one is not sharpened on its edges. The fittings all seem to be of brass. This particular example is a late style as used in duels in the mid-18th century. It is quite plain and not of the type worn sometimes at court. It is a very interesting weapon indeed.

PRICE: $2,500.00

 

 

Gardes du Corps Sword

Gardes du Corps Sword

Gardes du Corps Sword

Gardes du Corps Sword

Gardes du Corps Sword

Gardes du Corps Sword
Triple blood runners

Gardes du Corps Sword

Gardes du Corps Sword

Gardes du Corps Sword

Gardes du Corps Sword
Engraving on front side

Gardes du Corps Sword
Reverse grip

Gardes du Corps Sword

Gardes du Corps Sword
The Solingen maker

Gardes du Corps Sword

Gardes du Corps Sword

Gardes du Corps Sword

Gardes du Corps Sword

Gardes du Corps Sword

 

Fantastic Sword of the Elite Prussian Gardes du Corps (Item ANTWEP 4-24; GDUCORP 1-11; Special Items)

DESCRIPTION: The Gardes du Corps (Regiment der Gardes du Corps) was the personal bodyguard contingent of the King of Prussia and, after 1871, of the German emperor (in German, the Kaiser). The unit was founded in 1740 by Frederick the Great. Its first commander was Friedrich von Blumenthal, who died unexpectedly in 1745; his brother Hans von Blumenthal, who, with the other officers of the regiment had won the Pour le Mérite in its first action at the battle of Hohenfriedberg, assumed command in 1747. Hans von Blumenthal was badly wounded leading the regiment in a successful cavalry charge in the battle of Lobositz and had to retire from the military. Initially, the regiment was used in part as a training unit for officers as part of a program of expansion of the cavalry. Early officers included the rake and memoirist Friedrich von der Trenck, who described the arduous life of sleep deprivation and physical stress endured by officers, as well as the huge cost of belonging to the unit (the cuirasses, for example, were silver plated at a time when the precious metal was exceptionally expensive). Unlike the rest of the Imperial German Army after German unification in 1871, the Gardes du Corps was recruited nationally and was part of the 1st Guards Cavalry Division. The regiment wore a white cuirassier uniform with certain special distinctions in full dress. These included a red tunic for officers in court dress and a white metal eagle poised as if about to rise from the bronze helmet on which it sat. Other unique features of the regiment's full dress worn until 1914 included a red sleeveless Supraweste (survest) with the star of the Order of the Black Eagle on front and back and the retention of black iron cuirasses edged with red which had been presented by the Russian Tsar in 1814. These last replaced the normal white metal breastplates on certain special occasions and of course the most important piece of equipment of the elite guardsman and his most treasured passion was his SWORD. For the most part, this was a heavy cuirassier-style sword like the one Tom Wittmann shows in his book Collecting the Edged Weapons of Imperial Germany. On page 165, then on pages 166 and 167, he shows illustrations of cuirassiers wearing the degen or pallasch. He describes it as one of the most sought-after degens by collectors and the one pictured is in Tom’s personal collection. It is a great sword indeed, but not Gardes du Corps!!! Our sword, however, sadly is lacking a scabbard. Who knows what mystery attends this fact. Unfortunately, the wonderful weapon cannot talk. If it could it would surely weave the saga of battles glorious and deeds victorious! The sword sans scabbard still remains an absolute treasure in the museum and collectors’ world. The piece is quite large measuring 42 inches long from the pommel to the tip of the blade (a massive sword for a very big man). These Gardes du Corp officers were selected for many reasons but size certainly mattered! Most of them were at least six feet tall and looked seven feet tall when wearing the eagle-top helmet. This sword was constructed in such a way as to be effective as a weapon in combat; however, since this was the Kaiser’s elite guard it had to be special in every way. The blade is highly engraved with the name of the regiment in Germanic script. Just before the regimental name you can see the Gardes du Corps motto centered in a star. This reads “Suum Cuique” translated “To Each His Own.”). Following this regimental design the blade has the words “Regiment der Gardes du Corps.” At each end of the legend are deeply engraved floral patterns. On the reverse side is a beautiful depiction of royal guardsmen in a charge with the commanding officer in front with a bugler behind him and a whole regimental following all wearing the eagle helmet. The blade is made in the combat style with triple blood grooves. Even the top edge of the blade as it flows to the end of the engraving is decorated with oak leaves. The maker’s mark is for Clemen and Jung and their logo is on the reverse section of the blade nearest the guard. The grip is covered in ray skin with brass wire running down and wrapped along the length. The obverse side is stamped “Solingen.” The sword’s blade is in excellent-to-mint condition and has the most beautiful unsharpened finishes that we have ever seen on a Solingen blade.

PRICE:   This magnificent museum piece is $3,500.00 (with a scabbard this sword would easily bring over $10,000.)

 

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The centurion guard

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Note the mounted GDC rider.

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Note the GDC eagle-topped helmet with swords.

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Even this sword’s back spine is engraved.

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The maker in Solingen

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Major von Gerstdorf

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In memory of . . .

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Presentation Gardes du Corps Sword (Very Special!) (Item GDUCORP 1-A; ANTWEP 4-25)

DESCRIPTION: This is one of the greatest presentation swords of the German Imperial period that we have ever encountered. It is a model 1889 degen. You can view this very sword on page 199 of Thomas Wittmann’s book Collecting the Edged Weapons of Imperial Germany, Volume I. To quote Tom, this is a sensational lion-head sword presented to a retiring officer from the Kameraden in the Gardes du Corps (the Kaiser’s personal bodyguard regiment). The obverse blade is beautifully gold inlaid over the blue background panels. The blade ricasso features a mounted Gardes du Corps officer with drawn sword and eagle-top helmet. The inscription on the obverse blade translates to: “Major von Gersdorff from his comrades in memory of service in the regiment Gardes du Corps.” The reverse blade features the names of the presenters; almost without exception all are of Imperial royal lineage. Mr. Wittmann certainly makes no exaggeration in saying this: “One can run their finger softly down the blade and realize that this is a work of particular excellence far beyond the norm in German swords.” On the obverse of the blade are images of the eagle-top dress parade helmet and a potpourri of assorted weapons and the Imperial standard of the corps. The maker’s name as seen in two places is Ewald Cleff in Solingen. The grip is tightly wrapped in sharkskin and the lion’s head bears two rubylike eyes. Almost every hair on this old monarch’s head is separately distinguishable. It should be noted that one of the personages presenting the sword is Heinrich, Prince of Prussia (brother of Kaiser Wilhelm II). Almost every family name is preceded by the word “von.” Also, plainly seen, is Friedrich Leopold, Prince of Prussia, and other princes. There are at least 32 names that include Prussian counts, princes, and other very important nobility. The sword, including the grip, measures slightly over 40 inches long. Members of the “Gardes” were always quite tall. The image featured in a plaque known as the langet is a Roman Centurion. This is appropriate as these early warriors made up the bodyguard regiment to the Caesars. When the sword rests in its scabbard, it measures about 42 inches from the boot to the top of the lion’s head. The scabbard is of tombac material with brass carrying rings and bands. The sword is in excellent-plus condition, but the scabbard is a bit grainy from years of wear and then storage. Without a single doubt this is one of the most exciting finds in the collecting of Imperial weaponry.

Price = PRICELESS, but priced at $14,500.00

 

Hunting Weapons

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The maker

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Oak leaves on the top edge

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 Imperial Forestry Cutlass (Item ANTWEP 4-26; HUNT 8-22; KWEP 5-16)

DESCRIPTION: This imperial forestry cutlass is equipped with gilded brass mounts. The hilt has the usual "D" guard that ends in a deer hoof at either end. There is a lined ferrule on the piece, as well as a fine clamshell. The clamshell is the style with an elongated "foot" projecting out to the left. The white-bone grip plates are the deluxe, extra-cost type. They are in perfect condition, with fine veins in the surfaces. The grips are fitted with three acorns, each with a cap and a stem. The scabbard shell is constructed of black leather that remains in excellent condition, showing little age. It has the standard decorative edge lines and is sewn up the rear. The scabbard mounts are of matching brass, having scalloped edges where they meet the leather. The upper mount is equipped with a long acorn lug designed to retain a hanging frog. The 16-inch blade is etched on both sides; it remains clearly bright and has no pitting. The animals and etching on the blade are in practically unused, mint condition. The pictorial etching begins with a hunter’s holding a shotgun. Next is a stag and a deer in a forest glen, winding up with a deer head set atop a hunting bag. The reverse etch features a large stag, a scene of a hunting dog tracking a couple of foxes under a log, and ends with a stag and doe. The obverse of the blade is marked with the king and knight trademark used by W. K & C, dating the piece to the beginning of the last century. There is a purple-felt blade buffer in place. This is an excellent cutlass; we would have to say this is the very finest senior forest cutlass we have ever had or seen in many years.

PRICE: $1,295.00

 

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Reverse side

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Leather buffer

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Scabbard in good condition

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Forestry officers in the Third Reich

 Bavarian Forestry Official’s Dress Cutlass (Item ANTWEP 4-27; HUNT 8-23; KWEP 5-17)

DESCRIPTION: Here is a lion-pommel dress cutlass. Over the years a few of these have shown up; in fact we had one given to us on consignment and you can see it at (HUNT 2-3 on page 2 in Hunting and Shooting in Germany). Since then, we have learned some facts about these pieces. Thomas Wittmann also shows one on page 287 of his book Collecting the Edged Weapons of Imperial Germany Volume 1. This one, unlike the one we had at HUNT 2-3 of our site, is in much finer condition (as near to 100 percent excellent). Bavarian Forest wardens and other hunting officials carried these Hirschfänger on dress occasions. The Bavarian lion at the top gives these a uniformity not seen on commercial Hirschfänger. The grip plates are constructed of black horn material. The blade is unsigned as per usual with governmental-issued weapons. The piece is measured at 21 inches overall with a blade at 16 inches long. The blade is in practically mint condition and brilliant. The throat and boot on the dagger are still in wonderful condition. The crossguard is formed in the shape of deer hooves while the clamshell covers part of the upper throat. These Bavarian lion-pommel pieces when found are usually in quite worn condition. This one is the exception and is the best I have ever seen. The scabbard of fine-grained leather is in very good condition. This would have to be considered an Imperial treasure indeed.

PRICE: $1,500.00

 

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 Absolutely Gorgeous and Magnificent Early American Sword (Item ANTWEP 4-28; USARTICLES 3-24)

DESCRIPTION: Here we offer one of the finest American swords that we have ever seen. It is by the notable silversmith John Sayre in New York who worked from 1810 to 1831. The closest example we have found to a description is in the book The American Sword, 1775-1945. On page 108 figure #99 the author Harold L. Peterson shows a mounted artillery officer’s saber 1820-1840. The one he shows is similar to the sword we offer having a carved-bone grip with a tight hand-checkered pattern. Also, see the book known as The American Eagle Pommel Sword: The Early Years 1794-1830. On page 176, figure 44.b, the author E. Andrew Mowbray shows an artillery officer’s saber 1815-20. Although the sword shown is an eagle-head-pommel style the illustration shows a sword that is otherwise very similar to the one we offer. Also in the same book in the color section there is another sword that is similar to ours and with a heavily engraved scabbard. Mr. Mowbray claims this is a presentation-quality American dress saber. The languet, however, is plain where ours bears the highly decorative American-eagle motif. The sword he describes has the similar gilded etching on a blued background. Of course, we know that this sword that we have is unique, but we attempted to find one similar of the same general pattern. Swords such as this were worn by light-artillery officers as early as the opening years of the War of 1812, and this sword could very possibly be that early. Staff officers of the branches authorized to wear a saber also favored this form until 1832, when they were required to wear straight swords, and militia officers of many branches of service adopted it. It was superseded in 1840 by a new model. The curved blade is single edged. The upper part of the blade is blued and it is ornamented with a military trophy, the US Coat of Arms. (Federal Eagle). There are two bright panels with varying floral motifs. The knuckle bow is of the reverse “P” pattern decorated with leaf design and beaded ornamentation. All metal parts of the hilt are gilded brass as is the scabbard, which is heavily etched with floral decoration and an American eagle in take-off flight pattern. The tip of the scabbard is also etched with oak-leaf motive running about six inches up. The suspension on the scabbard is provided by two carrying rings. The crossguard is not engraved. There is a ferrule at the base of the grips and it is surmounted by a back strap. The overall length of the sword is a little over three feet. The condition is really excellent, no apparent dents. The American-eagle languet is repeated on both sides of the grip. On the rim of the back of the blade are the initials of the maker: “J.S & co.” The gilt National Eagle and floral designs are very outstanding. The blade does show some nicks almost as if used in combat. One of the blade escutcheons on the reverse side is a potpourri of various colonial weapons and a regimental drum. The pommel is decorated with heavy floral design. This is an extremely significant American sabre worthy of a prestigious collection or museum display.

PRICE: $12,000.00: a great bargain indeed; however, the consigner has decided to make it an even GREATER bargain and reduced it to $9,000.00

 

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 Circa 1812 American Eagle-Head Sword (Item ANTWEP 4-29; USARTICLES 3-27)

DESCRIPTION: Here is the typical “Standish Barry” eagle pommel sword as they were made in France for the American market during the early years of the 19th century. They always have the well-formed eagle-head pommel as their most notable feature. This entire sword’s design markedly suggests a date of manufacture no earlier than 1803. In the book The American Eagle Pommel Sword: The Early Years 1794-1830, author E. Andrew Mowbray shows three Standish Barry swords on pages 138 and 139. The sword pictured to the right of page 139 looks like the one we offer in closest similarity due to the eagle motif on the languet and the designs on the scabbard. However, both the swords shown have features that approximate our sword. The blade is undoubtedly of German Solingen manufacture. The grip is in the finest carved and incised bone in the finest tradition of this work. The blade decoration, particularly the deep etching, generous gilding, and the “Frenchified” motif is obvious and is of extremely high order. The blade has among other motifs the revolutionary cap dear to French “patriots.” The American eagle is shown again on the blade as he is on the languet, but in flight instead of perched, and he climbs from a scene of crossed standards that support the American flag shield. Also displayed is a grouping of weapons: swords, muskets, etc. The scabbard fittings are particularly ornate with floral design that sort of jumps out at you. About 1½ inches upward of the brass boot design of the scabbard it looks to have been polished with a grinder and it took out a very small part of the design at that point. Thankfully, the malefactor saw the problem being created and ceased this foolish endeavor. This does not really affect the beauty of this otherwise magnificently beautiful sword. It measures about 35 inches long in its scabbard. The leather of the scabbard is in what we would say excellent considering it is about 120 years old. Here surely is a grand and rather glorious piece of American military history.

PRICE: $3,500.00

 

 

 

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