Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Kaiser Reich

Magnificent Royal Sword

 

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
Note the paws

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
Scabbard tip

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword
Note Damascus pattern

Sword

Sword
Notice the Bowie-style blade tip

Sword

Sword
Wilhelm II, possibly?

Sword

Sword

Sword

Sword

 

Magnificent Royal Sword (Item ANTWEP 4-7; KWEP 5-13)

DESCRIPTION: Here without a doubt is the finest Prussian sword that we have ever seen except a few we’ve seen at the Deutsches Klingenmuseum (the Blade Museum in the German city of blades, Solingen.) There are many resplendent presentation swords in museums and in famed collections throughout the world but they are for the most part strictly for the purpose décor and like a marshal’s baton, they were for show! and off-times specially made for an officer to present to his Kameraden to honor their service together. But swords made for combat whether cavalry or infantry were practically always rather plain and somewhat undecorated (except when they happened to be the weapon of a royal personage or perhaps a marshal or even a general. That may be the case with this magnificent sword. It’s very different than the other large-frame swords of the 1814-1914 German era. The other great Prussian swords we have offered are known as “Grosse Degen” or “great swords.” All have had similarities, but this one strays far from the rule in several concepts. The first thing noticed is that the usual lion-head motif on the pommel is far different from the standard type. His jaws are not open and menacing. Rather, he seems to suckle or bite the top of the “D” guard’s end. Also, and this is an absolute first, the designer of the sword has placed a set of the lion’s paws crossed and spaced behind the mane of the head. This is unique. The “D” guard flows beautifully with wonderful Florentine design and has the armored helmet of a Teutonic knight in its central portion. The grip is formed in tightly woven ray skin with fine, silver-wire wrapping. Our pictures show many other appurtenances and decorative motif that clearly stand right out. The gilding is beautifully preserved throughout the entire sword. The hanger drop rings are very sturdy as they would be on a sword that although stunningly beautiful would be created for combat. The drag or boot at the end of the scabbard is completely different and again definitely seen as a sword of war! Seen on the face piece on the guard is an iron-cross motif, but what is depicted on it may be a clue as to why this sword is so special. In the dead center of this cross is a figure “W” centered with oak leaves supporting it with the unmistakable Prussian crown above it. Now, let your powers of reason and imagination tackle that one. During the early times, the Wilhelm cypher (and this is definitely what this is) could not be used except for members of the Royal Dynastic House of Hohenzollern. So dear collector, what do we have here? Do we have one of the Kaiser’s personal swords or possibly the former property of Wilhelm the Crown Prince, son of Wilhelm II? The only other possibility in our estimation would be that it is a sword of the elite Guarde du Corp Regiment, the personal bodyguard detachment at Potsdam or Berlin, which guarded the Hohenzollern Kaisers. That is possible, but not too probable.

The Blade

This blade is nothing short of spectacular, rivaling some of the finest dress swords. The blade is measures 32 inches in length. The tip of the blade is not even close to being like the dress swords. This one is made to be lethal, with a Bowie-type point ending! All in all, this is without a doubt, the finest Prussian fighting sword you may ever see. I believe it may well be a royal sword and an early piece possibly predating Kaiser Wilhelm I. In all my years and world travels I have never seen a better one among the ones I have had the distinct pleasure of seeing. It has a Damascus blade of the finest style of the art. The extreme fineness of the work enables one to readily see only the pattern in the blued section of the metal coloration. The rest is just too tight a pattern to get a good visual look in the photography, but the entire blade is most assuredly fine Damascus. The blade is partially dark blue with beautiful golden overlay with groupings of weapons and floral frill all about. Even the edge of the back strap shows wonderful patterning in gold. The sword in its scabbard measures almost 40 inches long. It is signed P. Knechts Damast. This one appears to be made by an individual master swordsmith almost assuredly in Prussia (Berlin).

$12,000.00. A fantastic bargain for sure.

 

 

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